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  1. #1

    Default what exactly does [w] mean?

    let say I see 2.3[1d6]+5
    Critical 20/x2
    Bonus: 15

    does the [w] add to the 2.3 number? if I had a 1 in the [w] would it now be 3.3?

    Also, what are my possible damage ranges?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    [W] stands for the base weapon die.


    2.3[1d6]+5

    2.3 is the die multiplier.
    1d6 is one six-sided die as the base damage.
    +5 is the enhancement modifier.
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  3. #3
    Community Member PsychoBlonde's Avatar
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    Default

    The weapon tooltip usually shows what your damage range is. For example:

    2.5[2d6]+15 means you roll 2d6 2.5 times. Or, basically, 5d6, then add 15. So your damage range would be 20-45, average damage 32.5 If you got effect (say, cleave) that gives you an extra +1[w], you'd roll 2d6 3.5 times, or 7d6, then add 15. So your damage range there would be 22-57, average damage 39.5
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  4. #4

    Default

    Alright, I understand that

    does the bonus at the bottom mean to hit?

    thanks!

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xirxx View Post
    does the bonus at the bottom mean to hit?
    It means a bonus to damage. It also can be identical to the to-hit bonus when there are no other factors aside from weapon enhancement involved, but that's unusual at higher levels.

    Unless...

    If you are referring to the bonus at the bottom of the inventory window for a selected weapon. That's the to-hit bonus based on BAB , enhancements, etc.
    Last edited by sebastianosmith; 07-29-2014 at 03:39 PM.
    The newest computer can merely compound, at speed, the oldest problem in the relations between human beings, and in the end the communicator will be confronted with the old problem, of what to say and how to say it. - Edward R. Murrow (1964)

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