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  1. #1
    Community Member cdr's Avatar
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    Default How I run DDO on Debian / linux

    Since there seems to be some interest and confusion, I thought I'd post how I run DDO on Debian. It's really simple - all of 8 steps from scratch to DDO by my count.

    I run x64 and the "testing" release (currently equivalent to "Jessie"). Both my desktop and my laptop are dualbooted, with DDO already installed on the Windows partition. This is Debian-specific, but likely applicable to Debian-derived distros, eg Ubuntu.

    1. Enable multiarch (technical details). This is required for Wine on x64. Sounds complicated, but only requires one line:
      Code:
      sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    2. Refresh apt:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get update
    3. Install Wine:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install wine
    4. Install 32bit OpenGL drivers, necessary if on x64. I have nvidia, if you're using ATI or Intel look up your appropriate package.
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install libgl1-nvidia-glx:i386
    5. Install PyQT4, a dependency of Pylotro (if you want to build Pylotro with python3 for no good reason, sudo apt-get install python3-pyqt4).
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install python-qt4
    6. From https://github.com/Lynx3d/pylotro download the source zip, or git clone it.
    7. Build Pylotro with
      Code:
      sudo python setup.py install
    8. Run pylotro, "switch games" to DDO, set game dir to the DDO program files folder on your Windows partition, enjoy.


    You may want to copy ddo.keymap and UserPreferences.ini from your Windows partition to "~/.wine/drive_c/users/<user>/My\ Documents/Dungeons\ and\ Dragons\ Online/" so you don't have to set them all again. Or you may want to start clean and adjust differently for linux.

    If you don't have DDO on a Windows partition already, it's easy to install DDO in Wine.

  2. #2
    Community Member azrael4h's Avatar
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    I've done this before, but I do want to thank you for posting this again. It's always handy to have this up front for those who want to game in Linux.
    It was the night before Hogswatch....

    Optimus Prime/Grimlock 2016 Because in diplomacy, sending in the Dinobots is the only answer.

  3. #3
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    No luck. Here's what I get in my wine output after logging into the Pylotro launcher:

    Code:
    p11-kit: couldn't load module: /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/pkcs11/gnome-keyring-pkcs11.so: /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/pkcs11/gnome-keyring-pkcs11.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory
    
    
    err:winediag:wined3d_dll_init The GLSL shader backend has been disabled. You get to keep all the pieces if it breaks.
    
    
    err:winediag:X11DRV_WineGL_InitOpenglInfo Direct rendering is disabled, most likely your 32-bit OpenGL drivers haven't been installed correctly (using GL renderer "Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ironlake Mobile ", version "1.4 (2.1 Mesa 8.0.4)").
    
    
    err:d3d:test_arb_vs_offset_limit >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> GL_INVALID_ENUM (0x500) from ARB vp offset limit test cleanup @ directx.c / 465
    
    
    err:d3d:match_fbo_tex_update FBO status 0
    
    
    err:d3d:match_broken_arb_fog FBO status 0
    Quote Originally Posted by Towrn
    ...when the worst thing that happens when you make a mistake at your job is someone complains on the internet, you probably care a little less!

  4. #4
    Community Member cdr's Avatar
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    The fun (haha) part about linux is you get to diagnose stuff yourself when it doesn't work.

    The gnome-keyring-pkcs11.so message is a warning, not fatal. Unfortunately in debian gnome-keyring is not currently multiarch compatible. That means uninstalling the :ia64 version and installing the :i386 version so Wine is happy, which I haven't tried but should work OK, or manually copying the two i386 libs it wants to the appropriate place, which is what I did. BUT, I think it wanting gnome-keyring may have to do with awesomium being enabled - I haven't tested - which is bad anyway. I forgot to mention it in the OP, but awesomium (or at least the way Turbine has it configured) is unstable under Wine and will most likely repeatedly crash DDO unless you keep awesomium from running. I have a shell script that just renames awesomium.exe in the DDO folder to something else so that DDO doesn't start it. Of course this will prevent you from using the DDO store or the help/ticket system, but that's DDO for you.

    So onto the real error - you're clearly using a mobile Intel graphics chipset, and Wine is very directly telling you that you don't have the 32 bit drivers installed for it. That was step #4 in the OP.

    Try "sudo apt-get install libgl1-mesa-dri:i386".

    Quote Originally Posted by BOgre View Post
    p11-kit: couldn't load module: /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/pkcs11/gnome-keyring-pkcs11.so: /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/pkcs11/gnome-keyring-pkcs11.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory


    err:winediag:wined3d_dll_init The GLSL shader backend has been disabled. You get to keep all the pieces if it breaks.


    err:winediag:X11DRV_WineGL_InitOpenglInfo Direct rendering is disabled, most likely your 32-bit OpenGL drivers haven't been installed correctly (using GL renderer "Mesa DRI Intel(R) Ironlake Mobile ", version "1.4 (2.1 Mesa 8.0.4)").


    err:d3d:test_arb_vs_offset_limit >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> GL_INVALID_ENUM (0x500) from ARB vp offset limit test cleanup @ directx.c / 465


    err:d3d:match_fbo_tex_update FBO status 0


    err:d3d:match_broken_arb_fog FBO status 0

  5. #5
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdr View Post
    Try "sudo apt-get install libgl1-mesa-dri:i386".
    I figured that's what it was telling me, but for the life of me I couldn't find a suitable driver on the intel site. Best I could find (for Ubu12.04) was an obsolete driver, which didn't work anyways. I will certainly try your suggestion.

    re:awesomium, sounds like a plan. Shell script in Linux is like Batch file in DOS? Should be simple enough, I'll look it up.

    Thanks for read/reply.
    B.
    Quote Originally Posted by Towrn
    ...when the worst thing that happens when you make a mistake at your job is someone complains on the internet, you probably care a little less!

  6. #6
    Community Member cdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOgre View Post
    I figured that's what it was telling me, but for the life of me I couldn't find a suitable driver on the intel site. Best I could find (for Ubu12.04) was an obsolete driver, which didn't work anyways. I will certainly try your suggestion.

    re:awesomium, sounds like a plan. Shell script in Linux is like Batch file in DOS? Should be simple enough, I'll look it up.

    Thanks for read/reply.
    B.
    On Windows you may be used to downloading drivers from a NVIDIA/ATI/Intel website, but for linux you're better off using your package manager (apt-get/synaptic/etc). These days the package manager can install even proprietary drivers with no issues.

    "libgl1-mesa-dri" is the open-source OpenGL driver, ":i386" means the 32-bit version. Unlike NVIDIA/ATI, old Intel mobile chips don't have a superior proprietary driver.

  7. #7
    Community Member Gidgamoe's Avatar
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    Default I also made an easy to follow set of instructions.

    Quote Originally Posted by cdr View Post
    On Windows you may be used to downloading drivers from a NVIDIA/ATI/Intel website, but for linux you're better off using your package manager (apt-get/synaptic/etc). These days the package manager can install even proprietary drivers with no issues.

    "libgl1-mesa-dri" is the open-source OpenGL driver, ":i386" means the 32-bit version. Unlike NVIDIA/ATI, old Intel mobile chips don't have a superior proprietary driver.
    If you are running Ubuntu 12.04 and want to play DDO full screen as I have try this link.
    http://forum.winehq.org/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=20912
    If it does not take you to the site then do a search on DDO.

  8. #8
    Community Member Rhysem's Avatar
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    If you feel that method is too easy, you can always try running windows under KVM and using vga passthrough to give the video board to windows. Synergy does a nice job wiring the two OSes into a single computer, and there you go; none of the pain of dual booting.

    Of course you get pain of "when windows restarts and ATI drivers try to load again, it hangs the machine" instead so YMMV.

  9. #9
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    I've more or less given up on the idea. Ubu 12.04 claims to have multiarch support built in, but wine won't run DDO regardless. Regardless whose instructions I follow, I always run into some problem or another. Whether it's getting multiarch to install, or wine, or pylotro, under Deb or Ubu, I've yet to have DDO run. So.... not worth any more hassle.
    Quote Originally Posted by Towrn
    ...when the worst thing that happens when you make a mistake at your job is someone complains on the internet, you probably care a little less!

  10. #10
    Community Member goodspeed's Avatar
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    well the main thing when dealing with linux or anything program wise with a mac is custom. Forget the official ****. If it's even there it's probably all screwy, bugged, ect. You want the stuff a bunch of die hard Linux users make to make programs work.
    Through avarice, evil smiles; through insanity, it sings.

  11. #11
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhysem View Post
    If you feel that method is too easy, you can always try running windows under KVM and using vga passthrough to give the video board to windows. Synergy does a nice job wiring the two OSes into a single computer, and there you go; none of the pain of dual booting.

    Of course you get pain of "when windows restarts and ATI drivers try to load again, it hangs the machine" instead so YMMV.
    KVM requires a 32 bit system too doesn't it? 'nother dead end.
    Quote Originally Posted by Towrn
    ...when the worst thing that happens when you make a mistake at your job is someone complains on the internet, you probably care a little less!

  12. #12
    Community Member cdr's Avatar
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    Again, debugging and figuring out things yourself is the price you pay for linux. I guarantee it could work, but only you can decide if it's worth the effort figuring it out.

  13. #13
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    I've dead ended a dozen different ways. And I pride myself on being a quick study, and going the extra mile to read/research when it's something I'm interested in... so that's saying something.

    Deb: difficult to install without a working CD/DVD drive. Both the Guided and the Manual partition stage are vague, and frankly too risky. If I was on a desktop and could drop in an old HDD to play with I'd be happier, but I'm on a lappy so my HDD options are limited. Installing from my Thumb to my external usb drive has failed 4 different ways, so I've given up on Deb.

    Ubu: dpkg --add-arch... fails. Doesn't like --add, tells me --add is an unrecognised command. --print-arch... tells me it's 64 bit, searching libraries confirms, Ubu documentation tells me it's already multiarch supported. Installing multiarch libs using the package manager seems to work, but I still get 32bit related errors in wine, wine1.4, and wine1.7.

    My conclusion at this point is that Linux, and in particular Wine, is just not stable enough or well supported enough on 64bit machines. I've jumped through the hoops, I've read encyclopaedias worth of docs, I've pored through directories and files and files and files in an unfamiliar and non-user friendly OS's file structure, and in the end made almost zero progress.

    When and if there's a nice, neat, 64bit version of Wine, or better yet a real Linux DDO Client, I'll try again.

    Also, this is my 3rd go-round with Linux. I gave it a shot back when Redhat 1st came out, claiming to be a tidy userfriendly linux release. Pfft, not even. I gave it another shot 5 or 6 years ago whith Ubuntu. Pfft. And with this latest attempt I think I'm done trying. It's still as terrible as it ever was to install and get working on any given system. Windows may be garbage, but at least it knows how to install itself and get you running your software with relatively zero pain.
    Sure, I'd love a cleaner, less bloated, more secure, faster OS. But until and unless the Linux community comes up with an install that "Just Works", I'll be sticking with Microsloth.

    @cdr: Thanks though. I do appreciate what you're trying to do. Hopefully your method helps SOME people. My personal experience is probably not representative of what most people will encounter.
    Last edited by BOgre; 02-15-2014 at 12:09 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Towrn
    ...when the worst thing that happens when you make a mistake at your job is someone complains on the internet, you probably care a little less!

  14. #14
    Community Member Gidgamoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOgre View Post
    I've dead ended a dozen different ways. And I pride myself on being a quick study, and going the extra mile to read/research when it's something I'm interested in... so that's saying something.

    Deb: difficult to install without a working CD/DVD drive. Both the Guided and the Manual partition stage are vague, and frankly too risky. If I was on a desktop and could drop in an old HDD to play with I'd be happier, but I'm on a lappy so my HDD options are limited. Installing from my Thumb to my external usb drive has failed 4 different ways, so I've given up on Deb.

    Ubu: dpkg --add-arch... fails. Doesn't like --add, tells me --add is an unrecognised command. --print-arch... tells me it's 64 bit, searching libraries confirms, Ubu documentation tells me it's already multiarch supported. Installing multiarch libs using the package manager seems to work, but I still get 32bit related errors in wine, wine1.4, and wine1.7.

    My conclusion at this point is that Linux, and in particular Wine, is just not stable enough or well supported enough on 64bit machines. I've jumped through the hoops, I've read encyclopaedias worth of docs, I've pored through directories and files and files and files in an unfamiliar and non-user friendly OS's file structure, and in the end made almost zero progress.

    When and if there's a nice, neat, 64bit version of Wine, or better yet a real Linux DDO Client, I'll try again.

    Also, this is my 3rd go-round with Linux. I gave it a shot back when Redhat 1st came out, claiming to be a tidy userfriendly linux release. Pfft, not even. I gave it another shot 5 or 6 years ago whith Ubuntu. Pfft. And with this latest attempt I think I'm done trying. It's still as terrible as it ever was to install and get working on any given system. Windows may be garbage, but at least it knows how to install itself and get you running your software with relatively zero pain.
    Sure, I'd love a cleaner, less bloated, more secure, faster OS. But until and unless the Linux community comes up with an install that "Just Works", I'll be sticking with Microsloth.

    @cdr: Thanks though. I do appreciate what you're trying to do. Hopefully your method helps SOME people. My personal experience is probably not representative of what most people will encounter.
    Wine is not unstable it works fine under desktop conditions it is the BIOS settings of the laptop that are the problem. I have a picture of Wine running DDO, Neverwinter Online and World of Warcraft at the same time. The laptop bios has to be set to other OS's or else it fails, most of the laptops I have come across will not allow you to switch to other OS's. Microsoft BIOS settings do not allow Wine to run properly. There is however a BIOS for Linux out there it is dependent upon your laptop manufacturer and model. My own Asus k73e is not one of the models selected to properly run the Linux BIOS. It is my own laptop and I will download the BIOS to try it out as I am a freelance tester of no renown.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdr View Post
    Since there seems to be some interest and confusion, I thought I'd post how I run DDO on Debian. It's really simple - all of 8 steps from scratch to DDO by my count.

    I run x64 and the "testing" release (currently equivalent to "Jessie"). Both my desktop and my laptop are dualbooted, with DDO already installed on the Windows partition. This is Debian-specific, but likely applicable to Debian-derived distros, eg Ubuntu.

    1. Enable multiarch (technical details). This is required for Wine on x64. Sounds complicated, but only requires one line:
      Code:
      sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    2. Refresh apt:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get update
    3. Install Wine:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install wine
    4. Install 32bit OpenGL drivers, necessary if on x64. I have nvidia, if you're using ATI or Intel look up your appropriate package.
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install libgl1-nvidia-glx:i386
    5. Install PyQT4, a dependency of Pylotro (if you want to build Pylotro with python3 for no good reason, sudo apt-get install python3-pyqt4).
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install python-qt4
    6. From https://github.com/Lynx3d/pylotro download the source zip, or git clone it.
    7. Build Pylotro with
      Code:
      sudo python setup.py install
    8. Run pylotro, "switch games" to DDO, set game dir to the DDO program files folder on your Windows partition, enjoy.


    You may want to copy ddo.keymap and UserPreferences.ini from your Windows partition to "~/.wine/drive_c/users/<user>/My\ Documents/Dungeons\ and\ Dragons\ Online/" so you don't have to set them all again. Or you may want to start clean and adjust differently for linux.

    If you don't have DDO on a Windows partition already, it's easy to install DDO in Wine.
    When I download the zip to my downloads folder and run the command sudo python setup.py install, it says no such file or directory. I think I've tried just about every suggestion on every site and nothing works.

    I've tried PlayonLinux (per https://sites.google.com/site/leesli...ng-playonlinux) and when running the DDO client from Turbine's website, it cannot connect to the Happy Cloud client.

    I've tried this:
    http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManage...ation&iId=2910

    And when I get to the part where I do: $ GC_DONT_GC=1 wine ddostandard.exe, it cannot find the ddostandard.exe.

    I've tried downloading the client from fileplanet. It installed. Running it from PlayonLinux doesn't recognize .net. I manually built the InstallRoot string in the registry to link the .net file to the client and it still doesn't recognize it. Tried a repair and it erases the InstallRoot string from the registry and errors out with cannot find .net, please make sure the InstallRoot shows the path to the file.

    I've tried updating wine. Tried five different versions of wine. Made sure my Ubuntu client was fully up to date with sudo apt-get update.

    Searched here:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1263192

    Nothing there helped.

    Is there anything else anyone suggests? I'm done.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cfpwizard View Post
    When I download the zip to my downloads folder and run the command sudo python setup.py install, it says no such file or directory. I think I've tried just about every suggestion on every site and nothing works.

    I've tried PlayonLinux (per https://sites.google.com/site/leesli...ng-playonlinux) and when running the DDO client from Turbine's website, it cannot connect to the Happy Cloud client.

    I've tried this:
    http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManage...ation&iId=2910

    And when I get to the part where I do: $ GC_DONT_GC=1 wine ddostandard.exe, it cannot find the ddostandard.exe.

    I've tried downloading the client from fileplanet. It installed. Running it from PlayonLinux doesn't recognize .net. I manually built the InstallRoot string in the registry to link the .net file to the client and it still doesn't recognize it. Tried a repair and it erases the InstallRoot string from the registry and errors out with cannot find .net, please make sure the InstallRoot shows the path to the file.

    I've tried updating wine. Tried five different versions of wine. Made sure my Ubuntu client was fully up to date with sudo apt-get update.

    Searched here:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1263192

    Nothing there helped.

    Is there anything else anyone suggests? I'm done.

    with Pylotro once you download the zup fille you need to create a Pylotro folder then unzip files into that folder then run the setup line

    i have been succesful with running doo with ubuntu up to version 13.10 in 32b and 64b systems using pyltro only issues i running tino is with the beta versions of 14.04

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdr View Post
    Since there seems to be some interest and confusion, I thought I'd post how I run DDO on Debian. It's really simple - all of 8 steps from scratch to DDO by my count.

    I run x64 and the "testing" release (currently equivalent to "Jessie"). Both my desktop and my laptop are dualbooted, with DDO already installed on the Windows partition. This is Debian-specific, but likely applicable to Debian-derived distros, eg Ubuntu.

    1. Enable multiarch (technical details). This is required for Wine on x64. Sounds complicated, but only requires one line:
      Code:
      sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    2. Refresh apt:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get update
    3. Install Wine:
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install wine
    4. Install 32bit OpenGL drivers, necessary if on x64. I have nvidia, if you're using ATI or Intel look up your appropriate package.
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install libgl1-nvidia-glx:i386
    5. Install PyQT4, a dependency of Pylotro (if you want to build Pylotro with python3 for no good reason, sudo apt-get install python3-pyqt4).
      Code:
      sudo apt-get install python-qt4
    6. From https://github.com/Lynx3d/pylotro download the source zip, or git clone it.
    7. Build Pylotro with
      Code:
      sudo python setup.py install
    8. Run pylotro, "switch games" to DDO, set game dir to the DDO program files folder on your Windows partition, enjoy.


    You may want to copy ddo.keymap and UserPreferences.ini from your Windows partition to "~/.wine/drive_c/users/<user>/My\ Documents/Dungeons\ and\ Dragons\ Online/" so you don't have to set them all again. Or you may want to start clean and adjust differently for linux.

    If you don't have DDO on a Windows partition already, it's easy to install DDO in Wine.
    excellent instructions. i have been using the ones from lee's linux blog for the longest time and everything worked perfectly up to the beta of ubuntu 14.04, following your instructions and getting pylotro from your link solved all my issues and it works perfectly.

  18. #18
    Community Member janave's Avatar
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    Thanks for the guides, I will be testing this with - Ubuntu Desktop 14.04LTS - once it is released to the public.

  19. #19
    Community Member Aliss7's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips. I've just got ddo running in fedora.

    I've got a dumb question I think though. I use autohotkey in windows and would like to use that in wine also. How do I do that? I tried making a winetricks verb for autohotkey and it seems to run, but then I run pylotro/ddo and it seems they run in separate spaces/virtual desktops? The hotkeys I specify aren't detected.

    Is there some way to run the two programs "together" so autohotkey sees ddo and runs its hotkey scripts?

  20. #20
    Community Member cdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cfpwizard View Post
    When I download the zip to my downloads folder and run the command sudo python setup.py install, it says no such file or directory. I think I've tried just about every suggestion on every site and nothing works.
    I guess it didn't occur to me that I needed to say to unzip the zip. But yeah, you need to unzip the zip.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aliss7 View Post
    Thanks for the tips. I've just got ddo running in fedora.

    I've got a dumb question I think though. I use autohotkey in windows and would like to use that in wine also. How do I do that? I tried making a winetricks verb for autohotkey and it seems to run, but then I run pylotro/ddo and it seems they run in separate spaces/virtual desktops? The hotkeys I specify aren't detected.

    Is there some way to run the two programs "together" so autohotkey sees ddo and runs its hotkey scripts?
    I wouldn't expect AHK or such to work great with Wine, since they tend to tap into very low-level Windows features. You may want to look at something that's designed to run on Linux.
    Last edited by cdr; 03-30-2014 at 11:26 AM.

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