Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 106
  1. #61
    Community Member Chai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin, birthplace of D&D
    Posts
    20,933

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gremmlynn View Post
    So blame Turbine for not having an indicator?

    Actually, this is likely close to the truth in this case as, unless you research character building, you may very well not know they exist. With the current enhancement UI, one must have taken the prereq's or click show all to even see them. Even then they show up as just another enhancement, not something special.

    Probably one of the reasons a need was found to make a better UI that highlights those prestige's.
    Turbine does have in indicator. Its a square with a cross inside it and when you mouse over it, you are shown how many action points you currently have available to spend. It may not be the most attention grabbing thing in the interface, but it is there.

    Every game has its 2% or so of players who simply learn at the lowest possible rate. Knowing about AP means visiting the character sheet, and clicking on each tab at the top in order to see what it does. Anyone familiar with how internet browsers work should already be familiar with this and at the very least, understand there is an interface here that allows them to allocate points, even if they dont understand what makes an optimal/viable build.

    Its likely the OP ran into the small percentage of folks who either missed this, or possibly some folks who are purposely rectricting themselves in order to increase challenge. To have 2 in the group at the same time is likely a rare coincidence.
    Advocating repeated nerfs in the name of "balancing the game" then complaining about how DDO is moving away from D&D, is a direct contradiction in logic - D&D 3.5 (what DDO is based on) is not a balanced game. We can either have a balanced clone MMO with homogenized classes, or we can have a D&D game. We cant have both.

  2. #62
    Community Member DeKalbSun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    174

    Default

    I went through a whole first life without knowing what prestige enhancements were or even noticing the box to check that showed
    me unavailble enhancements. I wasnt the most uberest toon for sure but I did alright. Maybe they were still learning the game,
    which is where everyone is at at some point.
    Mangas Geronimo (Paladin) Grocery Baggs (Ranger) Naiche Geronimo (Cleric)

    Guild - Orien's Rejects

  3. #63
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    302

    Default

    So don't group with them. Stop crying about it. Problem solved.

  4. #64
    Community Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyopa View Post
    I know I had expected DDO to be a lot like any other MMO in that I get a tutorial in the beginning that shows me most of what I need to know and there is not a huge learning curve after that. This is far, far from the truth of this game.
    I don't think I've heard of an MMO where this isn't far, far from the truth. What are those "any other MMO"s that you mention?

    Heck. In most cases just learning the basic map layout would take days (and I don't even mean the dungeons/quests/whateverhaveyou, just the cities and basic wilderness navigation).
    Your character will have at least a couple special abilities you need to learn how to use - and I don't mean learn which buttons trigger them, but the whens and wheres of using it efficiently.
    And then you need to learn the abilities of some dozen other character classes to know how your class can synergize with them in team, or counter them in PvP. And NPC enemies will have abilites you need to learn too.
    Gear and where to get it, places to get XP fast, various tricks, combos and stuff.
    Quests, bosses and their powers/tactics, and the ways to counter them.
    And then there usually are character builds, and that system is usually complicated enough to a whole separate game (min-maxing/"character optimization").


    But maybe I'm wrong... you mentioned Everquest; how small you can make a guide that will tell me everything I need to make and efficiently play a level 70 wizard(or however they call them) there?

  5. #65
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MindCakes View Post
    I don't think I've heard of an MMO where this isn't far, far from the truth. What are those "any other MMO"s that you mention?

    Heck. In most cases just learning the basic map layout would take days (and I don't even mean the dungeons/quests/whateverhaveyou, just the cities and basic wilderness navigation).
    Your character will have at least a couple special abilities you need to learn how to use - and I don't mean learn which buttons trigger them, but the whens and wheres of using it efficiently.
    And then you need to learn the abilities of some dozen other character classes to know how your class can synergize with them in team, or counter them in PvP. And NPC enemies will have abilites you need to learn too.
    Gear and where to get it, places to get XP fast, various tricks, combos and stuff.
    Quests, bosses and their powers/tactics, and the ways to counter them.
    And then there usually are character builds, and that system is usually complicated enough to a whole separate game (min-maxing/"character optimization").


    But maybe I'm wrong... you mentioned Everquest; how small you can make a guide that will tell me everything I need to make and efficiently play a level 70 wizard(or however they call them) there?
    Thanks for completely ignoring my context. The point being that the tutorial for that game at the time I played it gave you most of what you needed to know to manage your character. Certainly, there was plenty of learning to do about classes, monsters, and more advanced abilities, as well as where to purchase spell scrolls and more, but what you needed to know to manage your character was taught during the tutorial. EverQuest didn't have skills into which you invested points or feats you chose at level up.

    Instead, their skills were things your character learned by doing. Want to learn to swim in that game? Set your character swimming against a wall or a zone boundary, then go to bed. When you got up in the morning, you'd have a 200 swim skill and be done investing in that skill. Want to learn a new language? Have a friend macro-spam tells to you in that language while questing. After a couple of play sessions (or one very long one), you'd have a 200 skill in that language. In fact, I remember when teamspeak started to get popular, we'd get a group together of characters who knew various languages and macro-spam into group chat in different languages while we sat around chatting in voice. Those groups were actually a lot of fun. Even learning to cast a particular kind of spell (evocation, conjuration, abjuration, etc) were skills. If you didn't often cast spells of a particular kind, you'd eventually have to set up a macro to practice casting those kinds of spells. If you didn't, then you'd eventually not be able to cast high level spells of that kind - at all. Even meleeing was a skill you learned. So, anybody could be quite good at melee if they took the time to swing a weapon about. The catch was you had to swing weapons of various types about because melee was sub-divided into skills "bludgeoning weapons", "slashing weapons", "piercing weapons", etc. These were actually the skills that were the hardest to get caught up because if the monster conned green to you, you couldn't train the skill up and, as I recall, those skills did not train up in PvP. So, to have any hope of training those skills, the monster had to con at least light blue and anything higher than dark blue was going to smoke you if you had to rely on sub-par melee skills to get the job done.

    The characters really weren't that complicated in that game. My highest level character at the time I quit was level 67. Playing a level 67 druid was really no different than playing a level 1, 5, 10, etc druid. The only thing that really varied was the spells you'd cast and the places you went. For the most part, playing a caster was a lot of "stand up, cast spell, sit down". That was what casters did in that game. You see, there was no such thing as a rest shrine. Instead, you sat around when you weren't doing something else in order to meditate and regenerate mana (spell points).

    EDIT: I also had a 51 monk, 53 bard, 65 cleric, 33 necromancer, and several others that no longer spring to mind. The monk had more buttons to mash, but the mechanics of the character really didn't change over time, still. The bard was quite a lot of fun until they nerfed the bards' AoE songs. After that, there was no more clearing a zone by rounding everything up and running about in a circle playing damage songs until the mobs all died ... which I realize while writing that that it probably doesn't sound much fun, but it really was. There was skill involved in keeping the monsters close enough to be affected by the songs, yet far enough way that they couldn't eat you and all the while having to manage your buffs at the same time (lest they run out, especially haste, and you get eaten).
    Last edited by Coyopa; 08-03-2013 at 01:36 AM.

  6. #66
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    4,643

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyopa View Post
    Thanks for completely ignoring my context. The point being that the tutorial for that game at the time I played it gave you most of what you needed to know to manage your character. Certainly, there was plenty of learning to do about classes, monsters, and more advanced abilities, as well as where to purchase spell scrolls and more, but what you needed to know to manage your character was taught during the tutorial. EverQuest didn't have skills into which you invested points or feats you chose at level up.

    Instead, their skills were things your character learned by doing. Want to learn to swim in that game? Set your character swimming against a wall or a zone boundary, then go to bed. When you got up in the morning, you'd have a 200 swim skill and be done investing in that skill. Want to learn a new language? Have a friend macro-spam tells to you in that language while questing. After a couple of play sessions (or one very long one), you'd have a 200 skill in that language. In fact, I remember when teamspeak started to get popular, we'd get a group together of characters who knew various languages and macro-spam into group chat in different languages while we sat around chatting in voice. Those groups were actually a lot of fun. Even learning to cast a particular kind of spell (evocation, conjuration, abjuration, etc) were skills. If you didn't often cast spells of a particular kind, you'd eventually have to set up a macro to practice casting those kinds of spells. If you didn't, then you'd eventually not be able to cast high level spells of that kind - at all. Even meleeing was a skill you learned. So, anybody could be quite good at melee if they took the time to swing a weapon about. The catch was you had to swing weapons of various types about because melee was sub-divided into skills "bludgeoning weapons", "slashing weapons", "piercing weapons", etc. These were actually the skills that were the hardest to get caught up because if the monster conned green to you, you couldn't train the skill up and, as I recall, those skills did not train up in PvP. So, to have any hope of training those skills, the monster had to con at least light blue and anything higher than dark blue was going to smoke you if you had to rely on sub-par melee skills to get the job done.

    The characters really weren't that complicated in that game. My highest level character at the time I quit was level 67. Playing a level 67 druid was really no different than playing a level 1, 5, 10, etc druid. The only thing that really varied was the spells you'd cast and the places you went. For the most part, playing a caster was a lot of "stand up, cast spell, sit down". That was what casters did in that game. You see, there was no such thing as a rest shrine. Instead, you sat around when you weren't doing something else in order to meditate and regenerate mana (spell points).

    EDIT: I also had a 51 monk, 53 bard, 65 cleric, 33 necromancer, and several others that no longer spring to mind. The monk had more buttons to mash, but the mechanics of the character really didn't change over time, still. The bard was quite a lot of fun until they nerfed the bards' AoE songs. After that, there was no more clearing a zone by rounding everything up and running about in a circle playing damage songs until the mobs all died ... which I realize while writing that that it probably doesn't sound much fun, but it really was. There was skill involved in keeping the monsters close enough to be affected by the songs, yet far enough way that they couldn't eat you and all the while having to manage your buffs at the same time (lest they run out, especially haste, and you get eaten).
    Tell him again. I don't think he heard you.
    http://myaccount.turbine.com

    Je ne suis pas
    DDO Alpha Tester

  7. #67
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyopa View Post
    EverQuest didn't have skills into which you invested points

    So, anybody could be quite good at melee if they took the time to swing a weapon about.

    Playing a level 67 druid was really no different than playing a level 1, 5, 10, etc druid.

    bard...manage your buffs at the same time (lest they run out, especially haste, and you get eaten).
    I don't think your memory of EQ gameplay is as good as you think it is.

  8. #68
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FestusHood View Post
    I agree with this here. Now it's hard to believe someone could have gotten all the way to level 25 without doing any kind of research on their class, but it's possible.

    It's really easy for me to believe that people who are fairly new to the game might have no idea that prestige enhancements exist.
    To a person that has played any kind of D&D before it does seem strange to not do a little character research. But when it comes to video games there are an amazing number of players that believe that every thing they ever need to know about any game can be learned simply by playing it without making any effort to learn anything. I suppose games like Final Fantasy teach them this as characters basically level themselves (there is no thinking about where to spend points) and they don't get any new abilities that you have to put any effort into learning how to use. These kinds of players would never go onto the internet to look up information on their class and they would never check the show unavailable box to see what other options are out there that are not currently available to them (and more importantly learn why they are not available and how to fix it).
    Everyone who is not in the true definition of "hardcore" is looked down on as a "casual", unwilling or incapable of understanding the true brilliance of having twelve-year-olds insult you while they are teabagging your virtual corpse. - Christian Ward columnist for The Escapist

  9. #69
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrTastyHead View Post
    The implication of this statement is that, because I bother to actually read the things that are on my screen, this is somehow more than just a game to me. I assure you, that is not the case. Taking ten minutes to read things that are going to have an effect on every aspect of the character for as long as I play it does not indicate an obsessive level of play.
    When it comes to gaming I classify myself as a researcher. I enjoy learning about my video games. The more complicated a video game is the more I tend to enjoy it because there is more to research and more to learn. When I am not playing my preferred MMO, I am probably reading about it on the internet, writing about it on a message board, or day dreaming about what I will do or learn next in it. For people like me (and at least some degree you) reading up on an MMO is at least somewhat fun.

    For other people it is the third circle of hell. I have met people that would rather stop playing a game than listen to 20 seconds of information before they could make a decision. For some people video games are twitch experiences. They don't like to think. They don't want to strategize. And they certainly don't want to read. As a whole these people tend not to play MMO's, but as the MMO market tries to draw in more and more people (and we can thank WoW for that) we get more and more of these types of players.

    I personally have nothing against them, but you cannot expect much from them. Imagine if everything you knew came exclusively from first hand experience. You would hardly know anything. Most of us learn a lot by reading about the mistakes of others. We hear about the kid that burnt his hand on the stove and thus treat stoves with respect without ever having to make that mistake. These players get no such benefit. Until they make the mistake they know nothing about it. And if they find a workaround for the mistake (perhaps they think burning their hands every time they take something out of the oven is normal and the proper way to do things) they may never learn how to avoid the mistake and simply do it every time. It seems like a hard way to live life (and play video games) but they appear to enjoy it so best wishes to them from me. Personally I couldn't stand playing like that, but I understand that they have a different attitude than I do and they enjoy their way better.
    Everyone who is not in the true definition of "hardcore" is looked down on as a "casual", unwilling or incapable of understanding the true brilliance of having twelve-year-olds insult you while they are teabagging your virtual corpse. - Christian Ward columnist for The Escapist

  10. #70
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    8,255

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erethizon View Post
    When it comes to gaming I classify myself as a researcher. I enjoy learning about my video games. The more complicated a video game is the more I tend to enjoy it because there is more to research and more to learn. When I am not playing my preferred MMO, I am probably reading about it on the internet, writing about it on a message board, or day dreaming about what I will do or learn next in it. For people like me (and at least some degree you) reading up on an MMO is at least somewhat fun.

    For other people it is the third circle of hell. I have met people that would rather stop playing a game than listen to 20 seconds of information before they could make a decision. For some people video games are twitch experiences. They don't like to think. They don't want to strategize. And they certainly don't want to read. As a whole these people tend not to play MMO's, but as the MMO market tries to draw in more and more people (and we can thank WoW for that) we get more and more of these types of players.

    I personally have nothing against them, but you cannot expect much from them. Imagine if everything you knew came exclusively from first hand experience. You would hardly know anything. Most of us learn a lot by reading about the mistakes of others. We hear about the kid that burnt his hand on the stove and thus treat stoves with respect without ever having to make that mistake. These players get no such benefit. Until they make the mistake they know nothing about it. And if they find a workaround for the mistake (perhaps they think burning their hands every time they take something out of the oven is normal and the proper way to do things) they may never learn how to avoid the mistake and simply do it every time. It seems like a hard way to live life (and play video games) but they appear to enjoy it so best wishes to them from me. Personally I couldn't stand playing like that, but I understand that they have a different attitude than I do and they enjoy their way better.
    I'm guessing you haven't noticed all the warning labels things have been getting the last few decades. People have come to expect anything that's important or dangerous to have a big flashing red sign on it to tell them so. Currently, in the game, there is nothing that really differentiates PVE's from all the other enhancements. Though the new enhancement system seems to be changing that in a big way.

  11. #71
    Community Member goodspeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    I'm just outside that door to your left.
    Posts
    3,564

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aolas View Post
    Bleh, nitpicking. There is no difference in the spelling of English and english.

    Where's my cricket bat?
    Wouldn't English be used to refer to a people as a person where english would be used to refer to a language as a common word?
    Through avarice, evil smiles; through insanity, it sings.

  12. #72
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrTastyHead View Post
    I don't think your memory of EQ gameplay is as good as you think it is.
    Well, since you never played, then you're just going to have to take my word for it ... since I played it for 5 years.

  13. #73
    Community Member Manatha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erethizon View Post
    But when it comes to video games there are an amazing number of players that believe that every thing they ever need to know about any game can be learned simply by playing it without making any effort to learn anything. I suppose games like Final Fantasy teach them this as characters basically level themselves (there is no thinking about where to spend points) and they don't get any new abilities that you have to put any effort into learning how to use.
    I find this comment particularly funny as I came from FFXI and remember needing to research which gear to get...

    Develop twitch timing for skill chains and running magic burst on skill chains, knowing which element to use and which skill chain to use for which creatures (at the time I was playing, Japanese players were dominant, and effing up a skill chain ticked them off and made groups VERY hard to find)...

    If you didnt know what you were doing in a party, you better be up front with it and learn quick, because you HAD to party to level... solo was not an option.

    Magic was learned from scrolls, and you often needed a friend, or several, to help you get magic scrolls that were necessary for certain leveling zones. Coming without them learned if you were a caster often got you removed from the group....

    Not having the magic-enhance etc items needed for a caster, or the correct weapon/armor for your level (which could mean months of farming in some cases) was bad mojo and would get you removed from groups as well...

    My main was a beastmaster, so on a bad night I could lose a few levels. We were the only 'solo' class post dunes (level 10-15ish) that could level with speed. I probably made enough xp to hit 75 a few times over - but I knew all the moves each monster I needed to charm - or couldn't charm - better than any other class because my life and xp relied on me being self reliant and knowing it. Failing at knowing it or researching my gear = losing xp and having to respawn at the home point cystals, because no one was going out to rescue a BST. We were the best at solo, but it also meant we wandered to locations no one else would go.

    There was actually quite a bit of research for that game, and masses of charts for skillchains etc.

    But yea, we totally didnt need to learn anything and it was all handed to us..... no thinking or new skills as we level up....

    ....ignoring the fact each class had class specific abilities....
    .....class specific two hour abilities that you needed to understand when to use....
    .......new weapon skills at certain skill checkpoints....
    ..........an A, B, C, or D rating for each weapon that told us how good the weapon could get for a class as to where skill capped and how good they were with it....

    Anyway, having come from FF, I went to wow, from wow I came over here (with quite a few games between, but those are the major ones I care to list). One of the first things I did early levels was ask about the points and learn about the PREs. I actually blame looking up most of the stuff I do now on early FFXI (lists of crafting recipes which may or may not work, lists of crafts and how high each crafting skill needs to be to make one item - which because of the complexity may or may not crit fail and lose you a few million gil worth of items).

    Yep. They totally handed everything to us and there was no thinking whatsoever for FFXI. (Recall there was obscure stuff in the consoles too that you needed to hunt as well, but we're talking MMO not console right?).

    Yes, I understand that there were no Feats to spend into, and I understand that they didn't have the PREs, but stepping from there to here, DDO had a much more forgiving learning curve as far as xp and everything else. The point is, you still needed to research there, and not doing your research was still unforgiving. You also got one character (unless you paid for more slots) and that character could unlock/access all the jobs to change to in the game. When I played on my white mage, I used 'Nightfall', same with when I played beastmaster, bard or any other job I leveled, so rep followed you across jobs because all your jobs were on the same character.

    Edit: I dislike some of the PREs for a few of the classes - I can see certain classes (rogue, possibly a few others) being able to get away with not taking a PRE. At this point the EDs do much more for us than PRE do. That may change with the new system. I've noticed a lot of people really do not understand the way PRE are done the way they are in the game. I continually notice people asking questions on it in harbor. To include a sorc today asking how they move their two fire spells they bought onto their bar. They'd just gotten the sorc's enhancement to improve fire spells (passive ability, not active.)
    Last edited by Manatha; 08-03-2013 at 11:33 PM.
    Khyber Character: Main; Manathayria; Rogue making a circuit of paladin and other lives - yes I heal, but I expect a cookie when you don't die.

  14. #74
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Manatha View Post
    I find this comment particularly funny as I came from FFXI and remember needing to research which gear to get...

    Develop twitch timing for skill chains and running magic burst on skill chains, knowing which element to use and which skill chain to use for which creatures (at the time I was playing, Japanese players were dominant, and effing up a skill chain ticked them off and made groups VERY hard to find)...

    ..snip
    Final Fantasy XI was an MMO. Final Fantasy XI was nothing like any other Final Fantasy game. People that came to FFXI looking for the Final Fantasy experience were severely disappointed because FFXI played like an MMO not a Final Fantasy game. I am referring to Final Fantasy 1 through 10. Those games (like most video games) can be played mindlessly with no thinking or reading required. I was definitely not including Final Fantasy XI. It may share the same name, but it is not at all representative of Final Fantasy games.

    On a side note, the ability to change classes whenever you are in town was a great feature of FFXI that I would enjoy seeing in more games.
    Everyone who is not in the true definition of "hardcore" is looked down on as a "casual", unwilling or incapable of understanding the true brilliance of having twelve-year-olds insult you while they are teabagging your virtual corpse. - Christian Ward columnist for The Escapist

  15. #75
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyopa View Post
    Well, since you never played, then you're just going to have to take my word for it ... since I played it for 5 years.
    1. There were skill points and you could put them into skills. And in fact for a long time you had to put a point into a skill before you could start increasing it through use.
    2. Anybody could not be "quite good with melee" by using it. No matter how long an enchanter, magician, necromancer, wizard, cleric, druid, and to a lesser extent shaman, swung a weapon around they would not have good melee damage.
    3. Way too much to get into on this one, but just no. A 67 druid who didn't play differently than a level 1, 5, 10 etc. druid was just not a very good druid.
    4. There was only one buff that a bard used for AE kiting, and that was Selo's. Haste increases attack speed in EQ, not movement speed.
    5. I have played EQ off and on for going on 14 years now.

  16. #76
    Community Member Manatha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    70

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by erethizon View Post
    Final Fantasy XI was an MMO. Final Fantasy XI was nothing like any other Final Fantasy game. People that came to FFXI looking for the Final Fantasy experience were severely disappointed because FFXI played like an MMO not a Final Fantasy game. I am referring to Final Fantasy 1 through 10. Those games (like most video games) can be played mindlessly with no thinking or reading required. I was definitely not including Final Fantasy XI. It may share the same name, but it is not at all representative of Final Fantasy games.

    On a side note, the ability to change classes whenever you are in town was a great feature of FFXI that I would enjoy seeing in more games.
    I remember the chocobo breeding too... though I could never get into it if I remember right it took some research. But yea, much of FF prior to the MMO was like every other console game.

    I'd be interested to know how many people stumbled through the enhancements and ended up getting help on them in this thread though.

    I remember radiant servant(?) coming out for clerics and not knowing we finally got a PRE when I came back from a long break. I was told by someone in my group (through them complaining) that cleric had a PRE and I should have had it. I felt really gimp and once the party ended dropped group to go LR. If I remember right, I needed empower heal to get the PRE and I hadnt taken the feat so I needed to rework things. I grouped with that same person later and they seemed really happy I'd gotten the PRE. Probably because it meant I was able to spend more on keeping their red bar up.
    Last edited by Manatha; 08-04-2013 at 09:11 AM.
    Khyber Character: Main; Manathayria; Rogue making a circuit of paladin and other lives - yes I heal, but I expect a cookie when you don't die.

  17. #77
    Community Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coyopa View Post
    ... which I realize while writing that that it probably doesn't sound much fun, but it really was. There was skill involved in keeping the monsters close enough to be affected by the songs, yet far enough way [...]
    Umm... Q. E. D.?

  18. #78
    Community Member mobrien316's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    2,081

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DDOisFree View Post
    Every character should be taking prestige enhancements, not doing so is worse than merely being a gimp.

    Just like no one should be dump statting con.
    It's nice that you think so.

    If you are paying for their subscription, you certainly deserve to tell them how to build their characters.

    If you are not, and you think they are gimp, you can certainly choose not to group with them.


    Other than that, meh... If they are having fun without a prestige enhancement, who are you to tell them they are "worse than gimp" for how they choose to play?
    All on Thelanis: Archenpaul Sixblade, Archernicus Thornwood, Gregorovic Redcloak, Hermanius Brightblade, Jaklomeo Evermug, Jonathraxius Kane, and Praetoreus Silvershield.

    Cogito ergo summopere periculosus.

  19. #79
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    402

    Default

    I didn't have any Prestige class on my wizard for over a year.

    I didn't read anything, and had NO IDEA that if you didn't take a prestige you were basically a gimp in power compared. I thought, hey I'll start a wizard, so I can cast everything equally well, and I'll be adaptable.

    No, you're a PM, or an AM, or you don't matter. The PM survivability is insane, and the low low mana cost of being an AM WF is just so much better it's laughable.

    In DND the 'base' classes were fine, you could level and never take a side step, and you were a good character. For certain classes in DDO the power gap is just too huge. *Wizards it's soooooo apparent, i nearly quit playing my wizard, respec as a PM and instantly turned into a GOD compared.*

  20. #80
    Community Member Kalimah's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,000

    Default

    Its hard to comprehend that someone would play this game more than a week or so and not take the time to open internet explorer, go to google and type "DDO Wizard Builds" and read the discussions over the last 7 or so years. Even if you just choose to look at a recent build and read the Wizard Wiki it would put you on solid footing.

    Thats not to mention the countless newbie guides pople have written over the years.

    A new game there is some excuse, an old game like this has about all the information you could possibly need out there at the tip of your fingers for you to get.

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload