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  1. #21
    Community Member lyrecono's Avatar
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    Default old newbie

    hi, i understand what you mean,
    When i started ddo, as a free to play trie out, i rolled up a dwarven fighter and took kensai enhancements.
    put 18 into str, the rest was put into con/dex (if i remember correctly), took all the dps related feats and enhancements. picked up great axes and headed for korthos.
    I met wonderfull people in the harbor and ran nearly every night with a new buddy (a 2wf dwarf fighter) and 4 puggers.
    Every quest ended with him and me in the at the top of the kill list, usualy taking 85% of the kills. I had to learn a lot to adapt to DDO but liked it a lot, i mattered.
    Then at lv 11 and 12 he picks up greensteel items, he told me he was a tr???
    He soon outshinned me in the kill list.
    Even with all the dps related feats and enhancements my dps was to low to be on even footing with hard mobs, let alone elite. My platemail ment nothing to mobs and my ref save was abysmall. By the time i reached 17 i was a perma soulstone, being dragged to 20 by Tink and Star on on of their tr lives.

    The grim realisation that you can not bring anything to the table, not being able to carry your own weight, even worse, being a detriment to the quest objective is painfull as it is. People kept telling me that melee is dead in end game exept for 2wf with weapons of wounding/puntcering (and later 2 picks for auto crits) and i should role up a caster, wf sorc or humand pm.

    There went my dream of being a strong melee...

    So i put some money in turbine hands, grinded some gear and TR-ed, created my next build, wich was more viable and made it to 20 in half the time with four times the fun.

    Now this guy is a lv 20 barb with all destinies maxed out and 17 pastlives(epic commoner levels dont count).
    I can have him join any EE quest and have him contribute in a very possitive way!
    it took me years to get all the gear, tomes, past lives, reputation of being competent etc.
    Though i played many other classes, this is still my main guy and i enjoy playing him a lot.

    The power/player know. difference between this guy and his first life is huge though.
    i still meet the occasional new player (becomming a rare breed these days) and help them with gear and advise as much as i can because i've never forgotten i came of that same pier all those many years ago.

    moral of the story: persistance pays off?

    Should we make the game easier for newer players? i always assumed that was going on all the time?
    If we lessen the difference, would their sense of accomplishment be the same?
    Last edited by lyrecono; 07-18-2013 at 07:57 AM.

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluejadex View Post
    How is a new player (or one who simply hasn't run the quest before or hasn't run it recently) supposed to know the quest?
    Solo it to learn it. Running content you've never seen before is probably the best experience in DDO. I can't imagine ruining it by running content I'd never seen before with people who had.

  3. #23
    2015 DDO Players Council Hazelnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Livmo View Post
    Hazelnut,

    You're more than welcome to join us newbies on Sarlona. Hazelnut may be avail. there?

    I'm still learning the game and I have several toons at various levels. Also, I'm in an assortment of guilds and officer in a few if you need a guild home on Sarlona as well.

    It's my understanding from forums that Wayfinder is dying out so new people are started on that server to get more players on it. Sarlona might have more players to run with?

    All the best,

    Livmo
    Thanks Livmo. That's nice of you. I made a 2nd toon on Thelanis to find more people to play with. Largely because there seams to be an active halfling group called Hobbiton there.

    I tried making a Hazelnut on each of the North American servers (or at least the servers on the list I get when I log-in) and it was taken on all servers except Wayfinder. I think the previous Hazelnut is currently inactive (it doesn't show up on a site I found called "yourddo" that lets me look up other characters.
    Zyinniah Hazelnut and Curissa Hazelnut on most servers.

  4. #24
    2015 DDO Players Council Hazelnut's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for an interesting read. To the people who offered friendship and good advice, thank you. It's appreciated.

    To the people who thought they were offering advice but are mostly putting down anyone who is new, think on this. If you don't have a constant influx of new players, your game will die. You may be able to go somewhere else, but they you are new player. someone with a level 20 character (unless purchased outright) has put in the effort and time to learn the game.
    Zyinniah Hazelnut and Curissa Hazelnut on most servers.

  5. #25
    Community Member Talon_Moonshadow's Avatar
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    Default

    We have feat exchanges, GRs and LRs.... and gear matter more than build anyway...

    I am still playing my first character... in fact, he is still my favorite. I have changed him over the years, but he is still very close to the original concept.... that evolved as the level cap was increased.

    My main is an extremely odd build that many label as gimped.... in some ways they are correct.. in others, they miss the advantages and more importantly how it fits my playstyle preference.

    This game is also not that hard.

    Experience matters more than anything else.

    There is no reason to leave thi sgame simply because you do not like your first character.
    Or IMO, to abandon your first character.

    We also have TRs.

    So I say, play your first... change... adapt your first..... if you cannot stand him build an alt.

    Build alts anyway to explore the game and understand what you really want to play here...

    TR at 20 if you decide that you woul drather play something else... and still keep your first toon and all the love that went into it. (and gear you got along the way)




    Oh.. and I won't be TRing my main either....





    And btw: I am on Thelanis and would welcome any new player who wants to run something with me. All of my alts are in the Knights of the Shadows guild.... and 99.9% chance that any toon you see in that guild is mine.... but if by chance you encounter one of my part-time guildies, they are new guy friendly too....

    I do have toons on every server though... I could join someone on aother server as well. (although right now, I am really wanting to build up guild renown on Thelanis while the decay is turned off.)
    Last edited by Talon_Moonshadow; 07-18-2013 at 09:18 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jandric View Post
    ..., but I honestly think the solution is to group with less whiny people.

  6. #26
    The Hatchery GeneralDiomedes's Avatar
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    The gap between vets and newbs has probably never been smaller in the history of DDO due to ED and gear changes - you can get very decent equipment with just a little effort. Of course, if you put absolutely no effort in, you are going to be behind.

    I would explain to a new player how to acquire some decent mid-tier gear, and just let them quest to 25 on their first life and see how they like the game. Fixating on build points and TR is probably not the best approach.
    Last edited by GeneralDiomedes; 07-18-2013 at 09:33 AM.

  7. #27
    Community Member Teh_Troll's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneralDiomedes View Post
    I would explain to a new player how to acquire some decent mid-tier gear, and just let them quest to 25 on their first life and see how they like the game. Fixating on build points and TR is probably not the best approach.
    What class do you feel a first toon should be? it's an interesting question.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karavek View Post
    One of the biggest links between these 3
    Was YOU....

    why would you tell them their original characters were worthless???? thats a ridiculous elitist attitude that has absolutely no bearing on the game what so ever.

    I still have my very first character I ever created. Hes never been TR'd. created shortly after the game launched in 06.

    I Greater reincarnated him once in order to bump him up to a 32 point build.. But even then. It was with a heart I looted.

    stop being an elitist jerk to your so called "friends" and let them play the game.
    °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸,ø¤°º¤ø,¸ ¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸A R C H A N G E L S °º¤ø,¸¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸,ø¤°º¤ø,¸ ¸,ø¤º°`°º¤ø,¸
    Thelanis

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    Quote Originally Posted by Severlin View Post
    We don't envision starting players with Starter Gear and zero knowledge playing on Hard or Elite.
    Sev~

  9. #29
    The Hatchery Enoach's Avatar
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    In most cases the gaps between Vet and New players comes down to the following:

    1. Knowledge - About Game mechanics, quests, and build choices
    2. Gear - Raid, rare and utility

    Knowledge and Gear can be "earned" through game time.

    Knowledge can also be gained using external sources.

    Example: If a spell caster is finding Spell Penetration and/or Saves to be a problem against a certain type of mob, knowledge of spells and the creature can help them formulate a better option - IE spells that don't require a SR check and/or spells that target the mobs weaker Save.

    Gear can be purchased - I remember spending time in House D, House K and Marketplace watching for "Good buys". There is also the Crafting system as well as the Challenge Gear system that can allow a person to pick up nice gear, even if it is only temporary until you get something better.

    Personally I like to do new quests one of two ways:

    1. With Friends and Guildmates - All First time
    2. Solo - so I can see it all

    Then running it later with people that have done the quest to see what I missed or what I found that others missed.

  10. #30
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    The game that was released years ago is not the same game we play today. As much as the game itself has changed, so has the player base. Today’s veteran player has had the benefit of knowing the game in its infancy, and has seen the progression to its current state. Newer players (to varying degrees) know what they see in front of them, but don’t know, and haven’t experienced the history of how the game mechanics have changed over the years.

    For many folks, immersion was their best tutor; they spent hours upon hours to learn the quests, formulate tactics and techniques, and often times discover exploits that allowed them to become experts at the game. As time goes by and more content is added, they are able to duplicate this effort more efficiently; it becomes second nature. Newer players don’t have the benefit of experiencing this along with everyone else. Let’s face it, in the beginning, everyone was a newbie – some excelled faster than others, but everyone was forced to learn something new, which took time and an extraordinary amount of patience.

    Learning can’t be done all at once, well not for most people anyway. It needs to be taken in chunks and digested over time. It all goes back to the fact that this isn’t the same game it was in the very beginning. I would hazard to surmise many of today’s vet players would be just as lost in the game as newer folks are, if they were to have started with in the last month or two.

    As diverse as the word is, is as diverse as the body of game players on DDO. Granted, the anonymity of being hidden from view of one another puts some sort of filter between people, but the level of intelligence, cultural upbringing, and common sense relating to individuals in undeniable. We are all different, learn differently, and react to things differently.

    The ones complaining about new players are usually the ones who have had the benefit of starting the game when it was much more simplistic, and had the luxury of learning as they went. There is a lot of content with a lot of changes that people aren’t happy with because it disrupts their comfort level of game proficiency. Change forces people to adapt, and adaptation is not easy or fun for some.

    So, is it a problem of newer folks not taking the time to learn a game quick enough to suit the desires of vet players? Or is it a problem with veteran players not caring enough to be patient with new folks; imparting on them the vast knowledge and experience gained through the years?

    I tend to believe it is a combination of the two; however, most of the burden falls on the vet players to lead and train the newer folks. If they are the ones who take issue with the direction of the player base, then they are the ones who should make the concerted effort to effect change. There are some really good mentoring programs out there; I think there should be more of an effort to raise awareness and get some vets and many of these new folks involved.

    Negativity rarely changes things for the better, but positive steps to improve a situation will yield results everyone can be happy with.

    Just my 2 Copper worth of input

    ~M
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    MuleAxe (Triple Completionist) | MuleSticker | MuleRaptor | MuleFort | MuleParts

  11. #31
    Community Member bluejadex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuleAxe View Post
    The game that was released years ago is not the same game we play today. As much as the game itself has changed, so has the player base. Today’s veteran player has had the benefit of knowing the game in its infancy, and has seen the progression to its current state. Newer players (to varying degrees) know what they see in front of them, but don’t know, and haven’t experienced the history of how the game mechanics have changed over the years.

    For many folks, immersion was their best tutor; they spent hours upon hours to learn the quests, formulate tactics and techniques, and often times discover exploits that allowed them to become experts at the game. As time goes by and more content is added, they are able to duplicate this effort more efficiently; it becomes second nature. Newer players don’t have the benefit of experiencing this along with everyone else. Let’s face it, in the beginning, everyone was a newbie – some excelled faster than others, but everyone was forced to learn something new, which took time and an extraordinary amount of patience.

    Learning can’t be done all at once, well not for most people anyway. It needs to be taken in chunks and digested over time. It all goes back to the fact that this isn’t the same game it was in the very beginning. I would hazard to surmise many of today’s vet players would be just as lost in the game as newer folks are, if they were to have started with in the last month or two.

    As diverse as the word is, is as diverse as the body of game players on DDO. Granted, the anonymity of being hidden from view of one another puts some sort of filter between people, but the level of intelligence, cultural upbringing, and common sense relating to individuals in undeniable. We are all different, learn differently, and react to things differently.

    The ones complaining about new players are usually the ones who have had the benefit of starting the game when it was much more simplistic, and had the luxury of learning as they went. There is a lot of content with a lot of changes that people aren’t happy with because it disrupts their comfort level of game proficiency. Change forces people to adapt, and adaptation is not easy or fun for some.

    So, is it a problem of newer folks not taking the time to learn a game quick enough to suit the desires of vet players? Or is it a problem with veteran players not caring enough to be patient with new folks; imparting on them the vast knowledge and experience gained through the years?

    I tend to believe it is a combination of the two; however, most of the burden falls on the vet players to lead and train the newer folks. If they are the ones who take issue with the direction of the player base, then they are the ones who should make the concerted effort to effect change. There are some really good mentoring programs out there; I think there should be more of an effort to raise awareness and get some vets and many of these new folks involved.

    Negativity rarely changes things for the better, but positive steps to improve a situation will yield results everyone can be happy with.

    Just my 2 Copper worth of input

    ~M
    Very well put, I agree.
    Cannith:
    Isaela-Fighter 16 (TR)||Aeylya-Cleric 21||Draeya-Rogue 5||Sollest-Ranger 9||Fiarra-Artificer 9||Rinwenn-Ranger 7||Moliya-Druid 3||Onaya-Druid 7||Anniela-Favored Soul 7||Caelene-Bard 7||Kitartia-BladeForged 15

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Livmo View Post
    Hazelnut,

    You're more than welcome to join us newbies on Sarlona. Hazelnut may be avail. there?

    I'm still learning the game and I have several toons at various levels. Also, I'm in an assortment of guilds and officer in a few if you need a guild home on Sarlona as well.

    It's my understanding from forums that Wayfinder is dying out so new people are started on that server to get more players on it. Sarlona might have more players to run with?

    All the best,

    Livmo

    If you make a character on Sarlona I'd recommend checking out the Defense channel:

    https://www.ddo.com/forums/showthrea...EDIBLY-AWESOME

    Lot's of helpful people, advice, tomfoolery, etc.

  13. #33

    Default Just so I feel better about this

    Since all vets get accused by nearly everyone of being elitist and non helpful and caring that ZOMG I don't want newbs or n00bs or casual's to have my phat lootz I make the following statement.

    1. I don't like all new players apparently
    2. I don't want anyone who doesn't play as much as me or belongs to an elitist guild to have phat lootz
    3. I'd be happy if no new players join the game ever ever apparently
    4. You costing me 10% was a life shattering experience and I will need therapy for it
    5. This game is so easy a caveman can do it why can't you mr noob or newb or n00b.

    There I feel better because now I actually said these things that I was told I already said before even if I don't mean it.

    Bowerkoopa,

    I'm an elitist, whatever that means

    Keeper of Keenbean's Heart

  14. #34
    Community Member p4ined_one's Avatar
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    Question Another angle...

    Reading this has definitely shown the difference in groups felt in game, at least to me... however I posit a different view to account for the attrition of "newer" players. Perhaps the amount of views held either as "new player" or "old player" is indicative of the lack of "mid-players" (or insert better term here). This "mid-player" is lacking in the differential knowledge between the two groups. They understand how to "game the game" by focusing their efforts on xp/min in various ways at various levels, they've purchased something from turbine with real money, be it a subscription or packs. They've learned at least one method to get to level 20, and by that I mean they either know how to pug effectively, or how to solo (with and without a heal bot), or have found a static group, yet they have not mastered the social intricacies of the game. Yes, I said social, not technical or "grindy".

    It's not about what build works or doesn't, whether the technical knowledge of that player has reached it's end point or not, but rather about how welcoming that end-game crowd is, or rather, isn't. I've played for 2+ years, and during that time I've gotten stuck in this middle category of players. Maybe we're not as social as some, maybe we don't seek to prove ourselves against a sea of trolls, or maybe we are just reluctant in getting over that last hill of quests to gain the knowledge needed. One way or another, I believe it is a direct result of WHO you initially play with more than WHAT you initially play. In all my time playing, I've been "recruited" by several guilds, and founded a couple others so I could use gear in between them... I've never been kicked out, nor caused a stir of any type. I simply dropped out when I went for weeks without being invited to run anything. Let me restate that; I simply dropped out when weeks went by without a single call to the guild of "does anyone want to go run x" coming from someone other than newbies/level 10/- characters. I've helped a dozen people level their toons and many of them painfully slow I might add, as the rapid xp methods are simply more advanced than getting through a quest successfully.

    This may be a poor example to communicate the issue, but on the flip side, when trying to become a regular raider (let alone an epic or elite raider) I was shuffled through every raid I ever went on in a most hurried fashion. Where does one learn the intricacies of quests such as these? Roll up a self healer who has epic levels of sneak (meant for illustration, don't ask where that enhancement is found please) just so I can see what it's like inside? The wiki (and youtube) can only demonstrate how to follow (at best) effectively. I've seen experienced guildies go for months without ever grouping with a single fellow guildy to raid, yet they were always on timer, and played with guildies for over half their time. Most players I've run with would only run raids in the wee hours of the morning, leaving those of us who can't function without sleep to wonder "what if"... but these are just the symptoms of the underlying condition.

    Instead of arguing for a specific behaviour, or lack of, I simply put it that as it stands this issue seems to be rather boldly painted in black or white. Help the newbs feel powerful, or help the experienced retain that difference of power. The attrition that is spoken of isn't about old players leaving, nor about 1st week players abandoning their level 4's and going back to WoW. It's about semi-experienced players trying to be part of the group. If we all had friends/guilds that rushed 3rd+ TR's in a (week/month/whatever is appropriately less grindy to you), that had experienced players holding "Hound of Xoriat and you: how to complete this raid", that would coordinate their efforts with their fellow players without each of us having to "seek fame" as a way of merely finding committed players. Where are the players that want these "DDO Bootcamp completed" players to "train further"? Where are the guilds/groups/organizers who want these middle level players to turn into a team playing, coordinated mass, that can plow through whatever EH/EE they come against, simply because they've been through enough TR's together and have gotten used to a GROUP playstyle? Perhaps the divide is in fact a divide between the two mentalities of committed players, and what they are willing to work with, or more specifically what they expect of other (mid-)players...

    As to personality and how it plays (as I'm sure the trolls don't have enough weaponry already), I personally lead and make decisions every day with nobody else to "tell me what to do". When I play I don't want to be "Mr. Organizer Man", I just want to be a competent operator... yet all I've managed to find are other players who help newbs get their first toons up and running, and those that expect other toons to be perfect completionists or to razz them on their perceived newbness. Maybe this has jaded my view, but as a member of the gray portion of this equation, I believe that more can be done by the group of players to solve this problem and retain enough blood to keep the game around for years to come than could ever (or would ever) be done by Turbine.

    So I guess the point is next time you're out there looking for something to do as you've completed all you can think of, except perhaps grinding for another spell storing ring or what have you, have a look for 20+ players without wings... maybe they're still trying to grind enough to be part of your group and would be more effective if someone took an interest in recruiting this gray area, instead of treating "new" players like a disposable commodity. Recruit in your guild, train the basics and/or to get to 12-16, find more to recruit. Sounds like a pyramid scheme to me... which is just waiting for the suckers to realize it's a sham. Is that really what you think of DDO, that new players learning the game is a sham?

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by p4ined_one View Post
    I simply dropped out when I went for weeks without being invited to run anything. Let me restate that; I simply dropped out when weeks went by without a single call to the guild of "does anyone want to go run x" coming from someone other than newbies/level 10/- characters.
    Did you ever try extending such requests yourself?

  16. #36
    Community Member p4ined_one's Avatar
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    Default Point... missed...

    Quote Originally Posted by EllisDee37 View Post
    Did you ever try extending such requests yourself?
    Yes, just like forming my own pugs, and (attempting) to form my own raids/raid "please teach us" efforts... aside from being laughed at on the "please teach"... it isn't the point... are you comfortable asking for everything? Or do you grab your beloved favorite solo'er when you just want a break from running quests and avoiding disasters caused by innocent curiosity of those that don't know? (or insert "favorite fallback"... be it static group, or a short man group...)

    I could get into the zen philosophy of "leaning into the curves"... but simply put, it is a game we're discussing.

    Quote Originally Posted by EllisDee37 View Post
    I don't understand what you mean when you say "solo when you want a break from questing."
    You're still not getting it Dee. I'm not asking for social commentary on successful methods of grouping. I didn't include detail on "what the issue of X guild was" as it's not the point.

    Like the OP, and most everyone afterwards, I used personal perspective. This was an _attempt_ to relay that the OP's question is related to a remarkably large gray area, even though it is stating (and can be interpreted likewise since) an almost black and white nature. New, or old. Experienced, or not. Easy, or not. In reply to another's relations of what works for them I posit, that a person's actions are either 'comfortable, or not'. I do not ask for advice on comfort, as I didn't relate or relay my opinion of my comfort. This is meant to be a theoretical discussion on the observances I've had of a few dozen players that have left the game, both founders and very "new" players.

    I myself have never been in a guild that did raids, it has been something that seems impossible to find. A guild that does raids between 8am-11pm MT seems to be impossible to find. For me, and others that I include myself part of (One does tend to group with others like oneself). But this isn't about personal experience, as I'm still here, trying to make my experience better. But I have lost nearly everyone I met in the game to this subject, so mine is a perspective that differs from what has been expressed thus far, or so it would seem. If I express my opinion, it is that I am tired of leveling new players for 6 months at a time only to see them quit over these issues.
    Last edited by p4ined_one; 08-02-2013 at 09:44 PM.

  17. #37
    Community Member FestusHood's Avatar
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    To the op:

    The theme consistent between your mentioned friends seems to be that they abhorred the idea of doing a tr. They thought that they should be able to play up to level cap once and be just as viable as anyone else playing the game.

    If this was the case, what would be the point of continuing to play once you reached that point?

    I'm different than most people i guess. I see many people talking about finishing a character. I never want to reach that point. Finished for me means just that. Might as well delete him.

    True reincarnation is a genius idea. It really is. It allows you to keep making progress with the same character, almost endlessly. The chance to make a completely different build or class, but still retaining some benefit for what you've already done appeals to me greatly. |

    Tr'ing is like when a new season of a tv show you like comes out. You know it will be pretty much more of the same, but it's varied enough, and familiar enough at the same time to keep your interest. 'Finishing' a character by capping them and leaving them there seems to me like rewatching just the last episode of the first season over and over again, ignoring that a second season has come out.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by EllisDee37 View Post
    Did you ever try extending such requests yourself?
    of course he did. as did i, many times. same guilds, same experiences. he at least had the benefit of being dragged through a couple of raids - i have literally been on ONE (Chrono, and the two of us duoed that one) and i have a reasonably solid 25 heal-specced cleric. i've been fortunate enough that i found a few kind high-level players who helped me through some PUG flaggings, but that was at the cost of having to endure some idiotic teenager's insulting and whinging about low-level toons the entire time. what precisely about that experience is likely to make me want to put up LFMs, when the proportion of decent human beings to gutter trash is so minuscule?

    and i assure you, when one puts up an LFM and takes the time to put a message in it, and then is tacitly ignored by any and all who attempt to join the group... or when one asks one's guildmates if they want to run ____ and the only response is 'sorry, we're running waterworks' (AGAIN)... it rather takes the wind out of one's sails.

    believe it or not, had someone told me at the beginning that a cleric would suck as anything other than a healer (and even then probably still suck) without three lives of sorc and three of wizard... i would probably have done that. but now i'm at the point of having a perfectly decent cleric that i may have to throw away just to have her back. and it never was my desire (or intention) to have the be-all, end-all of boomsticks. i like playing support. why do i have to do something entirely other in order to be better at what i love?

    the point, though, isn't 'have i had a lousy experience'. frankly i'd rather keep playing this game completely alone than pick up one of the other MMOs available - but you can bet your backside that i don't recommend it to friends any more. there are a lot more games out there that are more friendly to the beginner; i literally only stick because i love D&D (and i really don't feel the need to find a completely new peer group in a completely different game when the one in this bloody game is so lousy). The real point is 'why are new people leaving' - and frankly i think the answer's been stated. make it more accessible - and that means the community as well the mechanics - or why would anyone half-sane want to stay?

  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by p4ined_one View Post
    are you comfortable asking for everything? Or do you grab your beloved favorite solo'er when you just want a break from running quests and avoiding disasters caused by innocent curiosity of those that don't know? (or insert "favorite fallback"... be it static group, or a short man group...)
    I don't understand what you mean when you say "solo when you want a break from questing."

    All my alts are built to be self-sufficient. When I log on, I do a quick check of the LFM panel to see if anything I want to run is up there. Most of the time there isn't, so I'll either toss up an IP LFM and start running what I want or I just true solo, like if I'm in the middle of a chain (tangleroot, sorrowdusk, etc...) or if it's a really short quest like the level 6 and under F2P stuff.

    I don't think I've ever asked in guild chat if anyone wants to run something; maybe like twice in two years, maybe. And I rarely join random guild chat "anyone wanna run x?" requests. What I will do, however, is look at the guild roster and see if anyone who is within one level of me appears to be idle, like on the airship, and send them a tell "running anything fun?" or "wanna run something level x?" This has a fair success rate.

    More often than not I don't bother with guild groups for questing, though. I generally do raids with guildies. I'm still unclear how/why you can't get into your guild raids.

    EDIT: Actually, I do almost always join "anyone wanna run challenges?" random guild requests because I dig them and can always use more xp pots/epic tokens. When I need to run challenges myself for whatever reason, however, I almost exclusively do it pure solo.

  20. #40
    Community Member eachna_gislin's Avatar
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    May 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teh_Troll View Post
    They built bad toons and had troubles later on?

    it is an issue, very easy to gimp yourself in DDO.

    The pre-built paths simply need to be less terrible and this will happen less. This is something Turbine should act upon, and no the Iconics are not a solution.
    Turbine almost lost me as a player because of the paths.

    I made a pre-built path paladin and was repeatedly laughed at in chat for being a "dumb noob" when I revealed this. TURBINE ABSOLUTELY HAS TO fix the paths to help retain new people. It's normally good practice to start a new MMO and look for a pre-built character that suits your play style so you can learn the specifics of that game. The paths are not just a little weak, they're so badly crippled that they're detrimental to play. As a result, the player base is not kind to people who play a path.

    I fell into a very nice guild with people who helped me slog through my first life, I stoned to 16 (another huge mistake), and I finished out at 25 and TR'd. Since then I've been learning to play the game. But if I had stayed on my path I probably would have quit the game. As weak as paladins are, the paths are even worse and I was basically useless my first life (no gear, no experience, low DPS class).

    Edit: I joined just before MotU, so I only had a taste of the game before epic destinies and epic 20-25 happened.

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