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  1. #1
    Community Member RavenJason36's Avatar
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    Default Class for Beginner?

    Hey there everybody, I used to play this game a couple of years back and had a lot of fun with it, but it sort of died off when all of my friends quit playing. I tried playing WoW the other day for the fun of it, but it couldn't compare with my love of D&D (Both the Online game and Paper/Pencil game). I'm deciding to try this game once again and hope that I can stay here as well.

    Although I'm familiar with the game, I haven't leveled a Toon past lvl 8 so I would still call myself a new player. Not to mention that I forgot a lot of stuff since I have played last.

    What I'm here for is to ask you guys what type of build would be recommend for beginners like me? In WoW, I was attempting to make a Paladin, not only because of they're fighting skills but the buffs they get for the party and other sweet spells they have.
    I was searching the "Melee" sub-forums and stumbled upon this build that seems pretty sweet. https://www.ddo.com/forums/showthrea...ladin-Rogue%29

    He says that it is meant for new players, but I'm not sure if he meant a new player that is looking to play solo, or find a group to play with. At first, I'm most likely going to be soloing as most new players do, but eventually I'd like to find a nice group to play with but I'm not sure how this build will be compared to others similar.

  2. #2

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    I do quite a bit of soloing with that build, as well as a fair amount of grouping. The build is solid (in terms of what it's designed to do) for either.

    A skilled player can make pretty much any build excel in groups. The build you linked is a solid foundation from which to acquire those skills.

  3. #3
    Community Member RavenJason36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EllisDee37 View Post
    I do quite a bit of soloing with that build, as well as a fair amount of grouping. The build is solid (in terms of what it's designed to do) for either.

    A skilled player can make pretty much any build excel in groups. The build you linked is a solid foundation from which to acquire those skills.
    Ahh, it's nice to hear from the guy who created the build Wasn't really expecting that TBH. But thanks for explaining that to me. Making my character now, I'm going to see how it turns out and if I like it or not.

  4. #4
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    There is room for improvement with the build, mostly in the area of stats, feats, and enhancements. The great thing about enhancements and feats is that they can be reset for only a platinum cost, with a timer on the later.

    At the core, though, evasion paladins are a great way to learn the game. You may have mediocre damage, but the ability to adapt to situations as they unfold and the personal self sufficiency is great for those who are learning. The downside of this is that they require some gear, such as Green Steel +5/+6 Charisma Skill items to really shine. But the up side is that you have the tools to manage a very wide range of situations. And the really great thing about this type of build is that as you progress and develop deeper into the game you can really learn what things are strong, and which do not scale with the upper tiers of the game. And once you have really managed to learn the game, you have one of the best past lives available at this point.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ForumAccess View Post
    There is room for improvement with the build, mostly in the area of stats, feats, and enhancements.
    Just those areas?

    The downside of this is that they require some gear, such as Green Steel +5/+6 Charisma Skill items to really shine.
    Er, what now? My pally has umd in the 40s and does not have a gs cha skills item nor does he ever plan to make one.

  6. #6
    Community Member burningwind's Avatar
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    best class for nebie are:

    #1 monk- reason: you have evasion, high save, sr, perm feather fall, perm fast run speed, and possibly good ac..what else can you ask for?
    #2 artificer- shoting bolt from range, with a dog chasing your foe and bb placed around you.. self healing, self haste buff.. what else do you need?
    #3 wf sorc- self heal, one hit most of the stuff in game..
    #4 pale master- reason: don't really relay on gear.. if you can stand the learning curve of caster.
    #5 druid- self heal, pet, can go both caster and melee.. you can never do wrong..
    #6 bard- sing a song and pike the rest..for most of the time no one will complain
    #7 cleric- stay back and heal.. as long as team don't wipe you are ok...

  7. #7
    Community Member Therigar's Avatar
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    IMO the most forgiving character class in DDO is monk. Even if you are not a button masher who learns and uses all of the special moves and abilities granted to them, monks are really a simple class to play and to play successfully.

    Artificer is an easy button class as well but has one important drawback -- it has no evasion. Even splashing rogue or monk for 2 levels to gain evasion is often not enough help. The class really needs work to boost its reflex saves -- something that is necessary when trap boxes are on the far side of an active trap. I do think that splashing artificer for 2 levels is worthwhile for the rune arm and machine gun. But, otherwise the class has some drawbacks.

    I personally don't care for arcanes so wizards and sorcerers do not seem good recommendations to new players. I also think druid is over rated.

    Cleric and favored soul are always welcome in a group but new players tend to be drawn into the heal-bot mind set which quickly detracts from their enjoyment. I use to recommend cleric to new player because the class is always welcome in a group. But, I'm not so big on this as a starting class any more.

    The evasion paladin build has a lot to recommend it. This build has been around forever in one form or another. The reasons are obvious -- good saves, general self-sufficiency, multiple abilities, etc. It is not great at any one thing but is good at multiple things. IIRC it was originally called the Batman build.

    For a new player sticking with f2p races and classes you could do much worse than to select the evasion paladin. The character that competes closest to it is a pure or near pure ranger. Saves will not be as good but, due to the rogue splash, most other characteristics will be similar or have an offset/counter.

  8. #8
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    Just wanted to chime in to agree that Monk and Arti are great - my two favs right now. But I also wanted to point out that Artis don't need Evasion if they take Insightful Reflexes and boost INT every chance they get, which I assume they would be doing since it also boosts their skill points and damage. Artis have tons of feats compared to other classes, so IR is easy to fit in.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by burningwind View Post
    best class for nebie are:

    #1 monk- reason: you have evasion, high save, sr, perm feather fall, perm fast run speed, and possibly good ac..what else can you ask for?
    #2 artificer- shoting bolt from range, with a dog chasing your foe and bb placed around you.. self healing, self haste buff.. what else do you need?
    #3 wf sorc- self heal, one hit most of the stuff in game..
    #4 pale master- reason: don't really relay on gear.. if you can stand the learning curve of caster.
    #5 druid- self heal, pet, can go both caster and melee.. you can never do wrong..
    #6 bard- sing a song and pike the rest..for most of the time no one will complain
    #7 cleric- stay back and heal.. as long as team don't wipe you are ok...
    In terms of gameplay I largely agree with your list. However, IMO one of the primary criteria for what makes a build good for new players is that they don't have to spend any money or TP to roll one up. As in: "Hey here's this game I've never tried before, let me roll up a character just to see what the game's all about."

    Monk, artificer, warforged, and druid are right out. Right after that "Hey let's try it" you get hit with "Spend real money on TP or a VIP subscription." That's very new player-unfriendly.

  10. #10
    Community Member Uidolon's Avatar
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    there are lot of viable options, dont feel you need roll a melee becuase they are more new player friendly its perfectly alright to start as a wiz or sorc.

    the caster system in DDO is to me one of the games strong points even if i think it has gotten way to spammy as the years have passed. while the Warforged race is the easy button for low lvl gaming for a caster you tend to pick up bad habits from playing one of those first off, i still prefer a fleshy caster myself as a first toon as i think a WF trivializes the game slightly low and medium lvl it equals out late game.

  11. #11
    Community Member Therigar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefferweffer View Post
    But I also wanted to point out that Artis don't need Evasion if they take Insightful Reflexes and boost INT every chance they get, which I assume they would be doing since it also boosts their skill points and damage.
    This is only true if you are not running elite content at or above level (in other words, you are running elite quests only when your character level is 1 to 2 levels higher than the quest itself on its elite setting) and you have enough hit points. In theory no character needs evasion if their saving throw and hit points are high enough.

    But, without evasion characters still take HALF damage from traps on a successful save. Even with Evasion the character avoids damage only if the save is successful. If you fail your save you still take full damage.

    Given the massive damage that elite traps do and the typically low hit points that artificers have (the result of being a d6 class for HP) it is very easy to end up dead in a trap even if you MAKE the saving throw successfully.

    The "Artis don't need Evasion" is not really true for the typical player and it is especially not true for the new player who is going to be inexperienced, under geared and (often) grouping up into quests that are above level.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Therigar View Post
    The "Artis don't need Evasion" is not really true for the typical player and it is especially not true for the new player who is going to be inexperienced, under geared and (often) grouping up into quests that are above level.
    For a long time I would read debates about the merits of evasion and think vets who argued it was nice but not necessary were crazy.

    Their point was that you can avoid trap damage by timing traps, and avoid spell damage by side-stepping them. I never really bought into this as viable, but it does happen. Through simply playing the game for a while I can now time traps to avoid any damage without evasion, and am getting pretty good at avoiding most mob spell damage (and melee damage, for that matter) just by moving.

    I think it's probably good for new players to mainly just stand there while playing the game in order to focus on learning the various ins and outs of their characters. In such a situation, evasion is hugely helpful. For longtime vets, however, evasion is a nice perk but by no means required because they can avoid most damage just by moving.

    Even still, I'm keeping the 2 rogue splash on my wizard. I think.

  13. #13
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    First off, there are really no "solo-only" builds. Any viable build for soloing is going to contribute in a group. There are classes and builds better suited for group play (bard, paladin), but no one will turn away a self-sufficient character with decent DPS that healers dont have to babysit

    Monk and Arti, as has been discussed, are among the 'best' classes for beginners since they're the most complete and self-sufficient...and they also work great when you "play them straight" as intended, ie you dont have to take any funky splashes or unorthodox playstyles to really make them effective, nor do you need to design a build around a certain set of gear. I'd go Arti over Monk for trapping skills, since traps are a major nuisance for the solo player, especially on Elite. Druid is also really self-sufficient and complete and balanced.

    But in case you dont have access to those premium classes (or Warforged, which I'd highly recommend for a newbie Arti), I'd say go with a Human Cleric with a melee focus (aka Warpriest, though DONT use the prebuilt Path). Again, you can "play it straight" and still be fairly effective, plus all that healing ability will help make solo play more forgiving, and naturally you're always welcome in a group.

    Paladin is another "tough to kill" type character, though I've always heard their DPS is painful. Ranger is versatile and can give you a lot better DPS, and you can splash in trapping with Rogue, but the self-healing is not as good, so I'd classify that as an "advanced beginner" class. I'd advise against any caster type until you've played through 1-20 once. And I'd advise against any build without self-healing, for obvious reasons

    If you feel like you're good at quickly ascending a learning curve, since you've played before, an 18 sorc/2 fighter axe-wielding Warforged is a very doable combination for the "not-really-a-beginner" beginner. You play it like a fighter, with feats and enhancements to boost your melee damage and STR/CON rather than CHA, and then take advantage of the Sorc's buffs, Repair skills for self-healing, and DOT spells to augment your DPS. Its a little more active keyboard-jockeying than a true fighter type, but more versatile as well.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by droid327 View Post
    If you feel like you're good at quickly ascending a learning curve, since you've played before, an 18 sorc/2 fighter axe-wielding Warforged is a very doable combination for the "not-really-a-beginner" beginner. You play it like a fighter, with feats and enhancements to boost your melee damage and STR/CON rather than CHA, and then take advantage of the Sorc's buffs, Repair skills for self-healing, and DOT spells to augment your DPS. Its a little more active keyboard-jockeying than a true fighter type, but more versatile as well.
    Oh yes, the learning curve. Being able to handle it does not require previous familiarity with this particular game. And if you can figure out how to play a more "advanced" character quickly enough... well...

    I count myself as a newbie still, I have a bunch of toons started and as of today the highest is at level 11.

    In my experience so far, evasion is useful particularly when you aren't soloing and someone else triggers the trap(s). Learning to time them is not particularly hard if you take the time to do it, but trying to follow a zerger isn't that. So, I count trap handling AND avoidance as at least a step or two above complete beginner, depending on how you're doing it. (Optimizing and remembering to use swap gear for traps, as practically required when running quests at-level on elite... well.)

    And if you're trying to avoid damage by actively moving - the Tempest prerequisite feats seem to help with that. (Dodge and Mobility; and Spring Attack to not miss as much while moving.)

    For a real beginner and f2p limitations (such as one of my sons, as of when last seen - he's learning but it'll take a while) a barbarian or fighter (with their own hireling healbot!) is probably the easiest to play "right", but obivously has rather severe limitations. And I do prefer having evasion when playing with him (see above)...

    ... and evasion early means you're usually looking at builds with more than just a splash of rogue, for f2p. Pure rogue is definitely not as "easy" to play with as with just a fighter splash or even a larger allocation, though - is there a reason why some people recommend pure rogue for beginners? I mean, learning curve and all...


    For some reason I don't have any evasion paladins yet, but so far at least the "warpriest", "warchanter" and "tempest trapmonkey" builds seem fairly easy for a relative newbie to be effective with, at lowish levels. The "pale trapper" is ... well, noticeably more advanced, at least - I don't have that one far enough along to have AOE spells, evasion, or prestige enhancements.

    And the drow cleric/ranger/rogue build by Phidius does IMO deserve a mention even if you have to grind 400 favor for it. It's a do-all build, it seems - somewhat more complicated to play than the three others but also much more versatile, it seems (so far - up to level 10 with this build).

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