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  1. #1
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    Default what should I know before training multiclass

    Could someone plz answer a newb question?
    what do i need to know about the game to start multiclassing?
    how many classes can i have?
    I have always wanted to train from other trainers but dont know what to expect what the effects will be?
    do all the abilities feats skills spells ect all work at the same time or do you have to specify what class u are using ?
    do abilities stats add together or is it some modification or formula for a ratio?
    anyway alot of things to worry about I just dont wanna gimp my new char and wast time.
    and how does multi -class effect exp
    any pointers or even a little tutorial would be helpful.

  2. #2
    Hatchery Hero BOgre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagodm View Post
    Could someone plz answer a newb question?
    what do i need to know about the game to start multiclassing?
    how many classes can i have?
    I have always wanted to train from other trainers but dont know what to expect what the effects will be?
    do all the abilities feats skills spells ect all work at the same time or do you have to specify what class u are using ?
    do abilities stats add together or is it some modification or formula for a ratio?
    anyway alot of things to worry about I just dont wanna gimp my new char and wast time.
    and how does multi -class effect exp
    any pointers or even a little tutorial would be helpful.
    The topic of multiclassing is huge. I'll quickly run through your questions, but before that you should know that before you start fiddling with other class combos, you really REALLY should have a plan of what you want your character to turn out like, which either means knowing almost EVERYthing about each of your chosen classes, OR (big or), look at a well-built pre-made build from here on the forums. Tell us what your current class is, and what kind of multi you're looking at, and we'll be able to guide you better.

    1) you can have up to 3 classes
    2) everything works at the same time, you don't 'specify' what u are using. It's a melting pot of abilities.
    3) Stats and abilities stacking: not sure what you mean by this exactly. give me an example?
    4) multiclass does not affect exp

    Please do let us know what kind of character classes you're thinking about before you start. It IS pretty easy to "gimp" your character if you don't know what you're doing, and it can be tough to fix a mistake once it's made.

  3. #3
    Community Member ~kruemeli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BOgre View Post
    Please do let us know what kind of character classes you're thinking about before you start. It IS pretty easy to "gimp" your character if you don't know what you're doing, and it can be tough to fix a mistake once it's made.
    e.g. If you are planning including a rogue or artificer Level in your build, it is important to take it at Level 1... to make the most of the skill Points.....

    Take a look at Ron's character planner... and play a bit with it. http://www.rjcyberware.com/DDO/DDOCharGen.html
    Read the DDOWIKI to see what feats come free with the classes... so you don't buy something you would get for free later...
    kruemeli - Orien. Leader of the "Merry" Hobbits
    http://www.ddo.com/forums/showthread...ld-Name-Change
    It's OK to be "merry":
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j4t185wl-0

  4. #4
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    The point of multiclassing is to get access to something your class is missing, like picking up a rogue level for UMD or 2 for evasion.

    There's a difference between splashing and splitting, a splash is mostly 17-19 levels of one class with 1-3 levels of one or two other classes where a split is ussually something like 12/8.

    If you're just starting out I'd recommend going for a splash if you JUST want to try it out.

    http://ddowiki.com/page/Classes Here you can see what each class gets "for free" at wich levels.

    The most popular classes to splash are:

    1-2 fighter for extra martial feats.
    1-2 monk for extra monk feats.
    2 rogue for evasion and UMD.
    1 wizard for an extra wizard feat.
    1-2 ranger for bow strength and/or rapid shot.
    2 paladin for charisma modifier to saves.

    Splashing is ussually done on the feat starved classes that don't take such a big hit from loosing level a couple of their higher levels, cleric is a good example since level 18, 19 and 20 don't add very much, thus a melee focused cleric is likely to splash 2 levels of fighter or monk and maybe even a level of wizard for up to 3 extra feats on a class that doesn't get any free feats at all.


    Id recommend though that you don't just start adding new classes to whatever character you're using without first consulting with someone who knows what they're doing, the people on the forum will ussually be happy to give out advice/pointer (although the forums are a lot less active than they used to be).

    The first step to making a custom build is to decide what you want it to be able to do. For a new player it's a good idea to only focus on 2-3 things like: Healing and melee, or traps, crowd control and instant kills, or buffs, melee and traps.

    Once you've figured out what things you want your character to do, you decide on a core class that will help you achieve atleast one of these things, then you use the other classes to kind of fill in the gaps, and either make the character better at what it's good at or helping it through the stuff that it lacks by splashing or splitting it with a class that synergizes well.

    To answer your questions:
    BOgre covered most of it

  5. #5
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    Thank you , you guys have answered some of my concerns. I started a pali only lvl 5 atm was thinking if he could wield long swords like a ranger whirling death ? but i probably should start the ranger and ad cleric or pali? i like the rangers fighting ability just want to heal self and others. but thats proly get gimped because the ranger has very small mana pool.
    What i meant by stacking together is does one feat ad more to another or do they just cancel out eg +1 for long sword proficiency in one class and +1 Long sword in another will it = 2 or stay at +1?

  6. #6
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    Double post because forum stuff happened
    Last edited by TheMash; 05-12-2013 at 05:04 PM.

  7. #7
    The Hatchery Enoach's Avatar
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    The main goal of Multi-classing is to Gain more than what you give up...

    Knowledge of how class skills effect your character build order - Such as the basic rule to always take level 1 as the class with the most Skill point potential.

    Knowledge of how your alignment effects your choices so that you don't come up with a Great Build Idea only to become stumped because One has a Lawful requirement (Monk/Paladin) and an other has a Non-Lawful requirement (Barbarian/Bard)

    For classes that have spell casting abilities you want knowledge on Spell level cut offs.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagodm View Post
    Thank you , you guys have answered some of my concerns. I started a pali only lvl 5 atm was thinking if he could wield long swords like a ranger whirling death ? but i probably should start the ranger and ad cleric or pali? i like the rangers fighting ability just want to heal self and others. but thats proly get gimped because the ranger has very small mana pool.
    What i meant by stacking together is does one feat ad more to another or do they just cancel out eg +1 for long sword proficiency in one class and +1 Long sword in another will it = 2 or stay at +1?
    If you want a melee ranger the break points are level 18 and 12 (or 14/15 if you want a level 4 spell or two), this is where their prestige enhancements (currently) kick in, specifically tempest wich is a fairly strong dual wielding enhancement.

    I would advice against splashing cleric levels (a cleric can be splashed with great success, but 1-10 cleric levels does very little for a character compared to other options).
    A 2 paladin splash would result in a poor aura but would give you divine grace wich is POTENTIALLY very strong as it allows you to add your charisma modifier to all your saves, this combined with evasion from level 9 ranger is an example of synergy and could potentially result in a character that eats fireballs for breakfast.

    so 18 ranger 2 paladin is a decent option.

    If you want to add more flavour to your toon, you could drop down to 14th ranger level, this will give you one level 4 spell (cure serious wounds and freedom of movement are both very decent options here). You could then go with 6 levels of paladin and get one of THEIR prestige enhancements as well (Hunter of the dead for example, gives you 10% healing amplification and a bunch of bonuses against undeads) and the ability to pick divine sacrifice. Or you could add some fighter levels for some extra feats.

    I'd advice you to figure out what you wanna try and post it here on the forums, I'm sure you'll get told if you're doing silly things.

    And finally to answer you question regarding proficiency:
    Proficiency allows you to use the weapon without an additional 25% miss chance, doesn't matter if you get longsword proficiency from more than one class as long as you have it

  9. #9
    Community Member AzB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagodm View Post
    Thank you , you guys have answered some of my concerns. I started a pali only lvl 5 atm was thinking if he could wield long swords like a ranger whirling death ? but i probably should start the ranger and ad cleric or pali? i like the rangers fighting ability just want to heal self and others. but thats proly get gimped because the ranger has very small mana pool.
    What i meant by stacking together is does one feat ad more to another or do they just cancel out eg +1 for long sword proficiency in one class and +1 Long sword in another will it = 2 or stay at +1?
    Rangers can heal self and others with a little effort spent on boosting their heals. I'm playing my TR through a Ranger life now. He easily heals for well over 100hp at a very small sp cost. With a simple lootgen item, I can double the spell point pool. I almost never run out of spell points unless I'm way over my head or trying to keep several people healed. There are really very few useful Ranger spells, so the sp pool is essentially all there for healing. At higher levels, I can UMD heal scrolls for 250hp fairly reliably, and these don't require sp. I started at level 1 with rogue and continued on with the rest Ranger. This allows me to do traps and only delays the Rangers abilities by one level, which is not too bad. One thing you have to consider when splashing is that some class abilities kick in at a certain level, like Rangers getting evasion at 9th level, and splashing 3,4, or 5 levels of something else before that level pushes getting that ability out to a very high level and can potentially make leveling harder, not easier.

    The nice thing about rogue is that there's some synergy with Ranger as Rangers get Spot bonuses and find traps is a class skill. So as you're leveling, you can easily keep these skills maxxed out without using a lot of skill points. Disable device is a non class skill, so it requires 2 points each level. To keep these three important trap skills topped up each level will cost 4 skill points. Compare that to splashing rogue with a pally, and those same skills require 6 points each level. So there's a little bonus for doing this splash with Ranger compared to pally.

    The dual wielding thing is fun, and obviously with a Ranger you get the major twf feats for free, so it's hard not to go twf. But after playing through barb, pally, and even bard lives with thf melee options I think thf is a lot easier to get serious damage with. The weapons choices are better too, at least from what I've been able to pick up over a dozen or so lives. The weapons choices for longsword are not great, there are better choices in kopesh or even hand axes. But of course, these cost feats to get proficiency.

    But quite honestly, if you're looking to do massive melee, neither pally or ranger are great choices. Both classes (along with the bard) are essentially unfinished as they stand, and plateau quickly. They can be quite frustrating and tedious to play through the teen levels to 20. Multiclassing them gives you some depth, like with a rogue splash that would give you evasion on the pally, and traps on both classes, or monk adding some martial choices. Fighter can add a little melee oomph as well, mostly by adding a feat per level for 2 levels. For something like the bard that is feat starved, it's almost a requirement to get basic martial feats to be able to melee even at a mediocre level.

    Also keep in mind the hit die for classes. If you want to play a melee Ranger, bard, or other class that has a poor hit die, you need to pay a lot of attention to getting hp everywhere you can. Pally is d10, Ranger is d8. So at level 20, the ranger is 40hp behind, as well as having fewer toughness enhancements. It adds up, and with a melee toon, hp is highly important.

    One one of my lives I tried an experiment leveling rogue, fighter alternating every other level. I took the Kensai I pre and the rogue mech pre as they were available, so by 12th level both were chosen. This gives a nice boost to trapping, and to melee. And of course there's the sneak attack bonus die as you level rogue. It was a little bit of a late bloomer, but after 12th level it was a monster melee doing massive sneak attack damage with a two handed weapon. And this sort of thing is where gear choice comes into play... deception was a must have for this toon, especially soloing, to insure that maximum sneak attack damage was available as often as possible. Add in evasion and dodge (and some decent defensive gear) for survivability, and UMD for self healing and some basic buffs and convenience, and it was a really useful, well rounded toon that could rival barbs kill counts, do traps, and heal himself and others remarkably well.

    That's one of the nice things about TR'ing. I've had a lot of fun playing with different combos to get the past lives. I played a barb to 20 pure and it was horrible, I hated the glass cannon feeling. So to get the past lives, I played with different combos. One of the most fun was actually bard/barb, although I cheated and went bard 12, barb 8, and then lesser reincarnated to get the barb levels needed to TR with a barb pl. But the toon was a blast to play. No, you can't cast while raged, and that took some planning ahead, but to have a melee that could do massive damage, buff himself and others, and heal? Yeah, it got a little clicky intensive sometimes, and it took some creative playing to make it work, but it worked amazingly well.

    I personally don't follow the pre-planned toons found on the forums because I think that takes a lot of the fun out of the experiment, but I have gone back and looked at some of them after playing my own versions and most of them are very similar to what I ended up with, and there were a few that were clearly superior. So if you're the type that doesn't want to experiment and wants something successful out of the box, look at some of the builds people have come up with. Following one of the standard build types will save you a lot of time and possibly aggravation. It is very easy to screw up a multiclass build. Probably one of the best things you can do to learn is to study some of the builds and play with the character planner.

  10. #10
    Community Member ~ChaosReigns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagodm View Post
    what do i need to know about the game to start multiclassing?
    Once you know the answers to your initial questions about the basic mechanics of what will happen if you talk to a different trainer, you're ready to go.

    BUT - if you want to not screw up your toon....

    1. plan its entire life in advance (ideally, before you create it, or once you're ready to TR).

    2. Refer to popular multiclass builds on the forums to get an idea of how this is done.

    3. Use the tool linked in kruemeli's post.

    4. Use ddowiki.com

    5. Work out what you want it to do, what feats it needs, which levels to take which feats, what its minimum ability scores must be in order to get those feats, where the rest of the build points will go, what skills you're getting, which classes to take at which levels, what type of gear it will need etc.

    Then answer the following questions: Are the levels of splashed classes doing what you need them to do? Is it better than taking more levels in your main class(es)?

    If the answer is 'yes', your toon will be okay.

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