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  1. #1
    Community Member Sir_Noob's Avatar
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    Default DDO Option Panel Guide for Dummies.

    I have had a look around and cannot find anything in the forums on this.

    So I am asking, is there a thread or a post somewhere where there is a detailed description for what each and every option does and suggestions to settings inside the Option Panel of the game?

    It drives me nuts that when in game so many people have poor in game voice chat, often finding others are choppy, quiet, etc.

    A nice description on what the settings do in detail would be nice to help improve these and many other aspects of the game.

    Often when I am looking at the short explanations while viewing them when in game the language is ambiguous or poorly written leaving me scratching my head.

  2. #2
    Community Member melkor1702's Avatar
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    Whilst I don't disagree with what you are asking for and I think it's a good idea, there is a but.

    The biggest problems I find with voice chat setups are

    1. people not using push to talk - if the automatic setting (can't remember what it's actually called in game) aren't right and the mic isn't in exactly the right place you get drop outs, choppy or quite voice. Also you get the added benefits of hearing everything that is going on in the background like, mum calling said player for dinner, someone yelling at the kids or whatever music they are listening to.

    2. Each mic, speakers, headsets are different, different combinations and postions will vary the settings required.

    3. 2 different groups of settings will affect the quality of the voice chat, well 4 if you include both yours and theirs. That is you need to adjust the ingame settings and the windows (or operating system) settings.

  3. #3
    Community Member Sir_Noob's Avatar
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    I see some of your points.
    However the issue I am striving to fix is knowing what each setting actually does.
    How will it affect my mic, or whichever part of the game I am trying to adjust.
    It is crazy how many different things I get told by other people on how to adjust something only to find out the answer is not correct.
    It becomes irksome to have 4 different answers on how to solve an issue when really none of them know the correct answer either.
    If there is a description that is detailed on how to use it etc, one can then make assumptions that perhaps a problem lies in settings outside the game or after reading the description make the correct adjustments in the option panel.

    The other things you mention can be corrected by asking someone if they could please go to push to talk as I do not want to hear you eating those crackers etc.

  4. #4

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    There are four settings in the Audio portion that you should be concerned with if voice chat quality is an issue:

    1. Voice Volume -- this controls the volume of the voices of other players in your group. It's like the music or effect volume sliders. You cannot control chat volume by person, it's an all or nothing affair.

    2. Voice Microphone Gain -- this basically tells DDO how much to amplify the sound of your voice as it is recorded from your microphone. If you do a test, for example, and people say your voice is too soft, trying increasing this to increase the volume of your voice.

    3. Voice Cap Threshold -- this only applies if you are using automatic chat (not push-to-talk). It is basically the volume level that distinguishes your voice from just background noise. If a sound on your mic is louder than the threshold setting, it gets recorded as voice chat. If it's softer, it doesn't.

    4. Playback Latency -- this setting is basically how much voice chat lag you want. The lower the number, the quicker you will hear other players when they speak. Lower numbers may come with voice quality issues, however, so if you are getting bad voice sound you can try increasing latency to see if it helps.

    Now, that covers DDO settings. You also need to make sure your Windows settings are correctly configured. I can only provide guidance for XP, it may or may not be the same on Vista or Win7.

    1. From the Control Panel, select Sounds and Audio Devices.
    2. Click the Voice tab and review the settings there.
    3. Make sure the appropriate device is set for voice playback and recording.
    4. Especially helpful is clicking on the Volume button and checking the levels there, especially your microphone recording volume. These volumes are like master volumes for your PC -- the ones in DDO are secondary. So, if your mic volume is low here, turning it up to high in DDO only makes it as high as it is currently set here. That may be a little confusing. If your mic volume is set to 50% in Windows, then 50% is the max it can be in DDO. If your DDO setting is 100%, you're getting 100% of the 50% Windows setting. If your DDO setting is 50%, you're getting half of the 50% Windows setting, or 25%. If you want greater control over volume from within DDO, set your Windows settings higher so you have more range within which to work.
    5. There is also an Advanced button. Depending on your hardware, you may or may not have any options there to adjust. Just check to see if the settings there appear rational.

    That is pretty much it for settings that affect voice chat. Unfortunately, a lot of the quality issues you may have with voice chat are due to poor settings on the other person's end, low mic gain or volume settings, for example, make their voice quieter in comparison to other players.

    Some tips to improve voice chat:

    1. Set your voice volume in DDO to 100%. Almost always the problem is people who are hard to hear, not too loud.
    2. Reduce background sounds and music to much lower levels so they do not contribute to drowning out voice chat.
    3. Increase your master (headphone or speaker) volume so it's easier to hear voice chat. You will probably want to reduce the sliders for most other game sound options, however, so they don't blow you away.
    4. Make sure your own setup is configured properly. Use the Mic Test option to hear yourself speak and make adjustments until your sound is clear and at a reasonable volume. Take note of where your microphone is in relation to your mouth -- you will want to keep it in roughly the same place any time you play. Moving it even an inch away, for example, can sometimes drastically change your voice quality. It really depends on your mic and your settings. Mic Test isn't perfect -- form a party with some friends and test out your settings as well to make sure real players hear you properly too.
    5. Encourage players with quality issues to adjust their own settings. Many times people aren't aware of how they actually sound. Keep in mind, though, that some of the problems with voice chat are inherent and are nobody's fault -- many times I've had one person in a party I could barely hear, but everyone else heard him or her just fine.

  5. #5
    Community Member Sir_Noob's Avatar
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    + 1 Rep for you kind madam/sir!
    Thank you very much for the detailed description TessRavenscroft.

    It is too bad that DDO does not have a detailed description like this here on the forum that one could look up that covers all of the settings inside the options panel.

    It doesn't have to advise people how to set theirs up.
    Just a detailed explanation of what it does, and how it is supposed to work.

    Example
    Voice Cap Threshold:
    this only applies if you are using automatic chat (not push-to-talk). It is basically the volume level that distinguishes your voice from just background noise. If a sound on your mic is louder than the threshold setting, it gets recorded as voice chat. If it's softer, it doesn't.

    At a low setting it is more sensitive and picks up more background sounds. At a higher setting it cancels more of the background noise out and picks up noises only closer to the mic.

    One more note on the XP setting.

    If you find yourself still quiet compared to others there is a + 20 DB setting box under the Advanced section for the microphone you can click on as well and that will make quite a difference.
    Last edited by Sir_Noob; 12-15-2010 at 12:29 PM.

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