Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default Party Formation and Leadership

    Party Formation and Leadership


    Dungeons & Dragons Online is highly focused around the formation of groups and entering dungeons to battle the forces of evil. While you can certainly party with people you know or have played with before, a great deal of playtime will involve grouping with other players you have yet to meet in the game.

    This guide focus’s on the leader of groups who advertise or seek out unknown characters to join his or her party, ie, the leader or PUGs or Pick up Groups. A PUG will be defined in this guide of any party consisting of one or more players who join a group advertised in the Grouping Window, or is contacted and invited to the group by the leader from the Who List. This guide will cover recruitment of other players to PUGs, frowned upon recruiting practices, and other related material of note in relation to running a party.

    Players are recommended to read or refer to other guides when reading this guide, as terminology used may not be covered or understood without clarification of other sources.

    Players should make note that this guide has be written in a step by step format. Therefore it is recommended that players do not skim the guide but read it in its entirety in regards to Recruiting Party Members.


    Party Leaders and Groups


    First the Party Leader: the player with the intention of forming and leading a party into a dungeon. Party Leaders start up or begin forming groups in one of two ways: They invite someone to party with them, or they advertise in the grouping window and someone requests to join to party. Once someone accepts to join or is accepted into the group, a Party of two is formed. An additional four players may be recruited into the group, or if desired the remaining group slots may be filled with Hirelings, or NPC party members.

    For those looking to run larger groups, a group may be changed from Party status to Raid Status once there are two group members in a group. Raid Status allows for an additional six other characters, but such groups may only run Raid type quests or wilderness areas. Note that Hirelings can't be included on Raids, and currently the The Subterrane, a wilderness area in the Marketplace, and the House C Manufactury, a wilderness area in House Cannith are raidable wilderness areas.

    Recruitment of players can sometimes be a time consuming and tedious process that varies with the time of day or what the group is being recruited for, the preferences of the person recruiting, and certain quests that may require careful recruitment of key players to help ensure a successful completion. However, the benefit is that the Party Leader has full control over who he invites into the party and the terms and specifications the party runs on. Additionally, the Party Leader has full control to remove undesired characters from his party if he is not content with them for whatever reason.

    It is however important to note however that some things are expected of the Party Leader when forming a party. They are expected to recruit the needed players to run the quest, so this may refer to character who can penetrate the Dungeon Bosses damage reduction or a Rogue to disarm the traps. They are also expected to form a party in a timely matter unless otherwise stated. With the power to manage a group as desired also comes the responsibility of doing so properly, so it is expected by many that a group leader to handle disciplinary actions when needed or to make group decisions (or make the decision to let other peoples make the decision where appropriate).


    Methods of Recruitment for Party Mates


    As stated, additional character may be recruited either by inviting them to join the party or them seeing an advertisement that your group is looking for more characters and requesting an invite to the party. When looking to get a party up as quickly as possible, it is best to pursue both options to get a full party. However there are some key points that should be followed:

    First, try talking to Friends or Guildmates, before you do anything else. Players are more inclined to join a group with characters already in it, or people they have played without before, especially if those characters are mission critical people that don’t need to be searched for. Also, if characters are standing in front of quest entrance, they may either be planning to run it, or part of a party being formed for it. Talking to them or checking for their group in the Grouping Window to join may be a good idea if everyone is looking to run the same quest. It both prevents you from having to compete with the other group for characters, and may allow for a group to form that much quicker, or simply allow you to join a group that is closer to entering the dungeon. This is in reference to characters who generally may be part of a similar LFM being advertised in the the Grouping Window, random characters that aren't grouped and standing outside a quest instance aren't considered at this stage.

    After you do the above, you should form a Looking for More advertisement in the Grouping Window to gather additional players needed to form a group. When making the advertisement, you should check off character classes you aren’t looking for, adjust the level range to meet the criteria of the group you are trying to form. After this you should scroll thought the quest list if you are looking to run a specific quest, or an example of a quest you plan to run in a quest area, and select the difficulty you would like to run the quest at, or can open it at.

    Next you should fill out a descriptive comment about your party, here you would include details such as No-Zerg, Favor Only, BYOH and so forth; also include what type of character you might be including such as needing a Healer, DPS, or Trap Monkey. You might also include some quest related information if you are forming a party for a multitude of quests or just planning on running in a Wilderness area, such as GH walk-ups, Ataraxia S/R/E; or include information such as N/H/E, or Highest Difficulty.

    Finally for information, you should consider what type of level range for characters you will be looking for to do the quest. Think about issues regarding loss of experience from people being too high a level for what you plan to do, or the level spread of characters in the party. Generally, try to have no more then a 3 level spread, and no character more then 2 levels above the Quest Difficulty Level + Hard or Elite Difficulty level increase. With the inclusion of Bravery, you may also want to consider those looking to continue their streaks by running the quest at 2 levels above the Quest Difficulty level or Normal only.

    After filling out the information, simply begin advertising for additional party members. Your advertisement will remain even if you close the window, and your chat log or speakers will let you know if you are getting requests for invites from those seeking to join your party. Keep in mind though that you can stop advertising for more if you go back to the Grouping Window and check off the Advertising Box, and that you can also modify your advertisement as your party fills. You can also get additional information from the Party Request window if you deem it important enough. An advertisement will also discontinue if your party fills all six spots, though you can toggle the advertisement back on with a full group.

    Another way of recruiting additional members is to simply type in a note in the General Chat of the instance you are currently in. Party Leaders may broadcast in the general area that they are seeking to fill out a party, and other additional information that relates to what they would already be broadcasting in the advertising window. In highly populated area a Party Leader may also jump between multiple instances or move to different areas that might be close by. This is one of the popular ways to gain additional party mates for the Korthos Island quests, especially newbies who might not know about the Grouping Window. It is however slightly annoying to some players further along in the game as well. Later on in the Marketplaces or Houses, you should probably consider against it.

    If it seems party recruitment is going slow, another important method for recruiting additional party memberst is the use of the Who List. The Who List represents all non-anonymous characters on the server and it can be filtered as needed if you are looking for certain people. Additionally, players may toggle their characters are Looking For Group, and Party Leaders may browse through a filtered list of just those players. Generally looking through the LFG list and sending tells to those people is fine, but players can also try messaging other people in the Who List as well. Make a note that some people may be afk when sending your tells but respond to you after a long period of time has passed.


    Key Warnings Regarding Recruitment


    A key note however should be made when looking to recruit additional players however. Some practices are frowned upon and Party Leaders should take careful note to avoid certain practices when recruiting additional players to their parties:

    It is generally frowned upon to send blind invites to characters in hopes that they join your party. It is also frowned upon to send a tell followed by an invite before the person on the other end has had time to even read what you sent or reply back. Generally people don’t like that little invite window popping up in front of them when they are engaged in other activities, and in the case of the blind invite, people won’t have any idea of what party they would be joining.

    It is also frowned upon to set up false advertisements for additional characters to a party. However, because it may be by mistake it is usually forgiven if the Party Leader does it by accident. If it’s a mistake, simply just modify or remove the advertisement when it comes to your attention.

    Another frowned upon practice though is leaving people sitting in the request queue’s for entry to a party. If someone requests to join the group, the party leader should either accept the character to the party, decline the character to the party, or send a Tell to the character about any concerns. It should be noted though that if a party leader accepts someone into the group and it fills the party that all other characters in the queue will automatically be declined.

    Finally, the most important note: Before you set up an advertisement, check to see if you will have time to run the quest. If your time might be short, make a note of it when characters join up.


    Principles of Managing a Party


    As a common rule, he Party Leader is the one who sets the pace for the quest. He’s the one who forms the party and who will make decisions. Generally this is done at the start of where the group forms or before the group enters the quest instance, but it can also be done during the quest. However, it is important to realize that a party leader should keep a few principles in mind when running the quest.

    The first principle is doing the quest within the limits of what the current party can or cannot do. Where you do the optional objectives or zerg a quest may be based on the simple fact of how much time a person may have to run the quest or the abilities of the party at hand. If a party enters a quest where their healer is simply a Bard with limited spellpoints, it might be wise just to aim to complete the quest as quickly as possible before those spellpoints run out, or to complete most of the quest to an end boss before heading back to look into completing some optional objectives.

    The second principle is running the party with other party members in mind. If you have some people who are running a quest for the first time, perhaps you should try and run every element of the quest for their benefit if it can be successfully run, or if they are looking for experience then the quest should be run to get the highest experience per second possible. Possibly the greatest concern is simply guiding someone through a quest that isn’t easily navigated or requires careful movement, and having to keep an eye on such party members to make sure they keep up with the group, or to go back and fetch them should they got lost.

    The third principle is simply to acknowledge when and if it is time to stop playing with certain characters or to abandon a quest. Sometimes it will occur that a party forms that isn’t up to the task at hand, or players behind the characters simply don’t get along. It could simply be that players are on different playing levels, or following strategies that don’t mix well with one an other. It could also be that the party simply isn’t able to pull off a quest. There is a time to regroup, and a time to leave a quest and sometimes even completing a quest with a bad group isn’t worth it.

    The final principle is trying to accomplish whatever goal it was that the Party Leader had in forming the party in the first place. Sometimes it might be to run a quest on elite, and sometimes it is just to party with other characters. Really it is the Party Leader that forms the party so there is nothing wrong with him trying to reach his goals, and people joining him can either help him or if those goals differ from what they want to do, they can simply form their own parties.

    Of course as well, it might be mentioned that this is a game and it might be a principle to have fun, if that even needs to be mentioned. Other players might have their own principles to add, and so might you who will be reading this guide.


    Other Important Notes


    Sometimes it may be deemed necessary to discontinue with a party mate, however, there a times when party members can't be removed from the party. It is important to note when managing party members, that they cannot be dismissed when they are in a dungeon or wilderness area. They only exception to this rule is when the player disconnects during a quest. Party Leaders will have to wait until players enter a public area to remove them from the party, or simply reform the party outside in a public area without them.

    Party Leaders are advised to try and filter out potentially problematic party mates before entering a quest, or boot them form the party whenever they enter a public area when they leave the quest instance.
    Last edited by DavionFuxa; 02-28-2012 at 10:55 PM. Reason: Guide Updated for 2011.

  2. #2
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default Reserved Post

    Communication and Planning

    It is important that when a party is formed that both the leader of the party and those that join the party that any issue that may come up be addressed. For example, if the leader doesn’t know the quest or if he is waiting on members to come later, then these should be conveyed to those joining the party. This also doubles for those joining in cases where party members may not know the quest or if they may lack the skills perhaps needed to get the quest done. If a Rogue can’t disarm traps or if a Favored Soul isn’t specced for healing then the leader should know so he can build a party around it.

    Communication is important and while it is possible to do a quest without communicating with each other, it may be more difficult for parties with lesser geared or lower leveled players. Besides conveying actions, it is also important for other things like letting people know you plan to bless the chest or splinter off to do something else from the rest of the party.

    Besides communicating some odd task you plan to do or before the quest starts, one also has to address what strategy to use while in the quest itself. Sometimes there are multiple strategies that can be used to achieve and objective, and which should depend on what the leader plans to do and what will work with the party. Do you rush to the end or do you take it slow, do you split up the party or do you stick together. Along with understanding what your party can do, it is important to understand what you yourself should be doing as part of the party.

    Something also important to consider is how you communicate. One can communicate in the game with headsets and microphones, typing, or just simply using /point or jumping your character for something. Generally how you communicate may depend on the situation so what you do may vary. For example you might type out a strategy before heading to do a certain part of a quest, or yell on a microphone an order for the rest of the party to hear because you’re in combat for part of a quest and wouldn’t have the time to type it out. Even just using /point or causing your character to do something in the form of communication in situations where you might be playing with people who might not speak English which can commonly happen on Wayfinder as an example.

    If possible it should be noted before hand on how you plan to communicate, such as with the No Mics, Mics Only comment in the grouping window or at least attempting to tell people as they join what the plan is through some means.

    Party Building and Roles

    First and foremost, it should be noted that you can run most quests can be run by any party with 6 skill players who know what they are doing, both in terms of how to play and run a quest. However, with a randomly formed party, you get who you get and they may be badly skilled which can be a deterrent to a successful completion. As such you should generally try to form a party that can at least make up for a potential disadvantage to help improve your odds of getting through a quest.

    Generally, the first thing to consider is running a quest with characters 3 levels or more above the quest level. Take care though because it is for those looking for Bravery Streaks to join such parties and being too high above the difficulty level will harm your given experience. Then again, it won’t reset streaks and some quests may be infuriatingly hard to run with random players 2 levels above or less then quest level, and some people may be up for running the quest.

    After considering the level range you should consider who you recruit. Generally you should grab someone who can heal (may include Wizards or Sorcerers where you have Warforged party members), a Rogue or Artificer to disarm traps (splashes and multiclass are fine if they are specced for it), a Divine Caster and Arcane Caster for relevant buffs/debuffs and offensive spells (Bards can perhaps work for either school but you should have a second caster to help out as their mana is limited), and a Melee character who can use melee attacks to do some useful stuff like holding monster aggression, boss beating, or what not. Not that you can sometimes fill the above roles with only a few people too, a Cleric for example can heal people while casting Divine spells and a Bard could handle some of the Arcane spells while acting as a capable Melee character if well built for it.

    Of course, you should be careful with relying on the grouping menu to recruit specific classes. If you put up an advertisement for a Favored Soul for example, it is highly possible you might get one that isn’t specced for healing. This doesn’t mean it would be a bad player you’re recruiting, but that you should consider if you need to recruit another character who could handle healing.

    Discourage Recruiting Practices

    While you are free to put whatever you wish in your Looking For More advertisement, care should be taken when doing so because certain things are discouraged by other players. Putting something that discourages players from considering your group in the first place is something you may want to avoid so you should keep in mind what your group might need to complete the quest rather then what you need rather then want.

    Basically keep in mind that you shouldn’t necessarily look to form the perfect party for every quest you run. Some things are of course justifiable like having 100% fortification in some of the tougher quests and having at least a certain level of hit points can also be understood as well in areas where being too low on health will just result in a stone in your backpack.

    That said if you go so far as to ask that certain players have some comparable level of ability to get his Debuffs off on a target or have a certain type of weapon on hand to break a Bosses DR when players you have already should be able to handle any such bumps already then you might be hurting your ability to recruit people needlessly. While a certain strategy may require having a player with the capability, another strategy may also work and as a leader you should consider being flexible enough to consider it.

    This doesn’t mean you might not be able to form a party if you go a bit above what is needed, but you should be aware of it being a problem. Worse, in some cases it may cause a negative lasting impression on your character which is never good as word can get around and you may find yourself having difficulty partying with anyone in any situation.
    Last edited by DavionFuxa; 12-18-2011 at 09:45 PM. Reason: Felt like adding more to the guide!

  3. #3
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default Writer's Note and Disclaimer

    Guide Writers Notes: After experiencing such things as blind invites, and having managed several PUGs, I thought this might be a good write up relating to the running of parties. It should be heavily noted that this guide is based on my opinions and that my opinions may vary from that of other players. There may be some information that should be added and I am happy to add content that is suggested to me.

    Disclaimer: Feel free to reproduce portions of this guide as you wish, but please give me credit when you do so. This guide may be updated should I feel like it, or if edits need to be made to information that is inaccurate. Feel free to point out such inaccuracies in this thread. Feel free to suggest additions to the guide.

    Credit: Additional Credit may be given to KillEveryone, Lorien_The_First_One, and shadow_419 for potential rewording, fixed inaccuracies, and points of noteworthy information. Inspiration for additional guide writing from sources like Theb and cardmj1.

  4. #4
    Community Member KillEveryone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Umpa Lumpa Land
    Posts
    3,684

    Default

    Meh.

    Never typed in gen chat advertising for a party and never will. It only covers the area you are in. Chat from market doesn't go into harbor, etc...so this isn't really effective if you are in one of the houses where the poupulation of people tends to be those already in a group doing quests.

    Spot on with the blind invite thing.

    I've always had good expierences with just the LFM though but like every pug, you don't know the caliber of player.

    The leader can only remove people when the offending person is outside a dungeon. Probably should note that.

    I think the only wilderness area that a raid party can get into is Sub T. I could be wrong but I know the Vale cannot be entered if you are in a raid party.

    Parties don't have to be ideal. Some quests do require specific skills/stats but most quests don't really need the perfect group. Just grab whoever applies, bring some pots and jump in.

    Some quests take a long time to fill. VoN for example. I have yet to fill in less than an hour because of it being P2P, requires flagging, and people can be on timer. This isn't one of the adventure packs that is as recomended as others such as the Twilight Vale pack so people tend to take the Vale pack over the VoN pack.
    Disappointed and without trust in the powers that be.
    http://ddowiki.com/page/Fansites

  5. #5
    Community Member Lorien_the_First_One's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    17,767

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavionFuxa;2907446"
    Recruitment of players is typically a time consuming and tedious process, and requires careful recruitment of key players to run the quest. No, its not. Generally any 6 players can run any non raid quest in the game Just clicking on the first 5 people to join is fine for most quests. If you are afraid of running without a dedicated healer then save one spot for that.

    even people standing in front of quest entrances, before you do anything else.do not bother random people just innocently standing around

    Another way of recruiting additional members is to simply type in a note in the General Chat of the instance you are currently in.This is the single best way to ensure you annoy experienced player and ensure that not only do they not join your group, that they blacklist you from theirs.

    Finally, there is one more important method for recruiting additional party members, and that is the use of the Who List. The Who List represents all non-anonymous characters on the server and it can be filtered as needed if you are looking for certain people. Sending tells annoys about half the player base and generally isn't a great way to recruit if you don't know the person. If they want to quest, they should know how to open the LFM panel
    Some good stuff...some not so good stuff

    \\

  6. #6
    Community Member shadow_419's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    458

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavionFuxa View Post
    Party Leaders and Groups


    For those looking to run larger groups, a group may be changed from Party status to Raid Status once there are two group members in a group. Raid Status allows for an additional six other players, or hirelings, but such groups may only run Raid type quests or wilderness areas.

    Hirelings can't be used in raids.
    Unless this has been ninja implemented, hirelings have never been allowed in raids.

  7. #7
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default

    Some edits have been made. May include change in wording as well as additional information.

    It should be noted here though that I'm not trying to simple not list a way to recruit an additional party mate. Whether it is a bad or good way to do so is no reason not to list it. I have added notes though in relation to what was said in any case.

  8. #8
    Community Member KillEveryone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Umpa Lumpa Land
    Posts
    3,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DavionFuxa View Post
    Some edits have been made. May include change in wording as well as additional information.

    It should be noted here though that I'm not trying to simple not list a way to recruit an additional party mate. Whether it is a bad or good way to do so is no reason not to list it. I have added notes though in relation to what was said in any case.
    Some people read what they want to see. Others may just skim along and see something that is actually bad but do not read the rest.

    Good ways should be more emphasised and bad stuff should be listed at the bottom if included on what not to do. Your guide lists stuff in a step by step manner and someone that, if they decide to follow your guide, may move on to the next step...such as advertising in gen chat...without fully reading what your paragraph says.

    This is actually a hinderance to those people.

    On another note about leaders. Some people will lead because they have a need to control. Some people lead to get something done that they wish to accomplish.

    The thing about recruting people standing outside the dungeon entrances...I don't actaully see people standing in front of those entrances unless they are waiting for their other party mates. This isn't really a good tactic to try and fill a party. Once in a while you may get parties to merg.

    The grouping pannel is the best most important way to get together a pug. Hitting up your guildies in guildie chat is a good way to get some people in your group. Sending a tell to your friends is ok too but they may be in a group sometimes so this may not be as effective.

    I have tried the Who tab to see who has the LFG icon but I think that may be bugged or someone hasn't turned it off so it looks like a person is listed as looking for a group. My expierence with the Who tab is that it isn't worth the hassel so I don't use it for filling a group anymore. If someone in your party is sending tells to people on the tab as well as the leader, you are just going to get people upset with you. My parties haven't filled using this method, espically for quests that are P2P.
    Disappointed and without trust in the powers that be.
    http://ddowiki.com/page/Fansites

  9. #9
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default

    I can't cater to everyone, some people will read the guide improperly, some will read it properly. To try and list it so that the good is on top and the bad comes later doesn't really work either because recruitment is more of a step by step process to begin with, that's why I listed in the order that it appears.

    That said though, I can add a note about reading the guide, and then if said people come along and skip the the note, well, can't help with that. The guide isn't for everyone but most likely if people are skimming the guide, they don't really need tips for starting up and recruiting for parties. I'm not looking to cater to veterans with this guide. I believe however that newbies should benefit though with in-depth explanations if that is what they need.

    I didn't emphasis it, but I did say something about 'forming a group his terms of specifications' which should cover the fact about control. But really, that should be obvious so I don't see it as really needing to be emphasized anyway.

    And again I'm not going to take something else just cause it might be less effective or discouraged method to recruiting people. I myself don't use the General Chat to broadcast LFM's, but I can say I have messaged people standing around in front of dungeons for lower level quests and more or less most of them have joined my party in the process. The Who list I commonly don't use as much for the reasons you mentioned, but I do sometimes use it when time seems to be going by and I'm getting no more hits to join the party.

    Pretty much to me I have had good success with the Who list too for recruiting as well, and most of the replies back from those who haven't joined have usually included a 'Thank you' of some sort as well. I might though add an additional later on how to use the Who List in forming a message to get new party mates.

  10. #10
    Community Member Otherworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Belgium, West-Flanders
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Really nice and informative guide. Though most people here on the forums (who actually read them), probably already know about these methods (and which ones to use).
    Still, a nice addition.

  11. #11
    Community Member theb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lorien_the_First_One View Post
    No, its not. Generally any 6 players can run any non raid quest in the game Just clicking on the first 5 people to join is fine for most quests. If you are afraid of running without a dedicated healer then save one spot for that.
    Generally, six skilled players can run any quest. Randomly filled groups will fail often enough that it is important to strive for party balance.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lorien_the_First_One View Post
    Sending tells annoys about half the player base and generally isn't a great way to recruit if you don't know the person. If they want to quest, they should know how to open the LFM panel.
    Healers have been receiving random tells every hour since level two and are totally numb to it by now. If they're not anonymous, you might as well ask them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lorien_the_First_One View Post
    even people standing in front of quest entrances, before you do anything else.do not bother random people just innocently standing around

    Another way of recruiting additional members is to simply type in a note in the General Chat of the instance you are currently in.This is the single best way to ensure you annoy experienced player and ensure that not only do they not join your group, that they blacklist you from theirs.
    Spot on, Lorien.

  12. #12
    Community Member Beld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    730

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theb View Post
    Generally, six skilled players can run any quest. Randomly filled groups will fail often enough that it is important to strive for party balance.
    If you consistently strive for party balance, you will have a rockier path to becoming a skilled player.

    Learning to do things differently or for yourself will teach you many more things about this game than always needing to build the 'perfect' party for questing.

    While you wait forever to build balanced parties, you are losing valuable gaming/leveling/xp time IMO


    Quote Originally Posted by FlimsyFirewood View Post
    Some people don't like to play hard. That's why we have 'normal'.

  13. #13
    Community Member theb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    597

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beld View Post
    If you consistently strive for party balance, you will have a rockier path to becoming a skilled player.

    Learning to do things differently or for yourself will teach you many more things about this game than always needing to build the 'perfect' party for questing.

    While you wait forever to build balanced parties, you are losing valuable gaming/leveling/xp time IMO
    I have only played a healer past low levels, and have never waited around. Only level 19, so still new to the game.

    In my experience, you don't have to go looking for challenges with pick up groups, they find you.

    When the wizard casts finger of death on everything even if it is a lone mob and the rest of the party took away 3/4 of its health, and he won't stop and goes out of mana, you're basically 5 and 1/2 manning it right there. When the other wizard is on a turbine "path" (of necromancy no less), and the drow has 8 con, or when the barbarian pulls every devil at the end of running with the devils to ambush the five shrining casters...yeah. These are all level 18 characters, by the way, and this is just from last week and off the top of my head. The cleric who cast a pet in sleeping dust, so we did without him for the most of the quest, until the sorcerer accidentally cast firewall for the second time and we failed [the first time he cast it we got the challenge of trying to complete the quest without being able to kill a single additional spider]; the fighter who thought he was immune to red blade barriers; I can't even tell you how many people won't stand still for heals or buffs, group or single. The blown traps...the levers hastily, stupidly, and against instructions pulled...the blood spattered pits in rainbow in the dark...this isn't even counting the gimped characters without adequate fortification, or whose low damage output other members may suspect but no one else can really quantify, or all the low hp characters out there and mana sponges only the healers can identify.

    Any guide for the type of person new enough to use a guide should emphasize the power of party balance to compensate for low individual power and/or poor form by all involved. Plan your best for the worst, be prepared for at least two party members to be entirely dysfunctional, and come well enough equipped for it not to matter. It really would help if the three or so competent players had complementary skill sets. Party balance (which is much more than just five melees waiting for a healer) should be emphasized. Being perpetually and catastrophically dead will not do anything for your xp/leveling/gaming experience, or help you fund your resist and cure pots, or underwater action and feather fall items bought from the auction house, etc.

  14. #14
    Community Member Azmich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Somewhere over the rainbow.
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by theb View Post
    I have only played a healer past low levels, and have never waited around. Only level 19, so still new to the game.

    In my experience, you don't have to go looking for challenges with pick up groups, they find you.

    When the wizard casts finger of death on everything even if it is a lone mob and the rest of the party took away 3/4 of its health, and he won't stop and goes out of mana, you're basically 5 and 1/2 manning it right there. When the other wizard is on a turbine "path" (of necromancy no less), and the drow has 8 con, or when the barbarian pulls every devil at the end of running with the devils to ambush the five shrining casters...yeah. These are all level 18 characters, by the way, and this is just from last week and off the top of my head. The cleric who cast a pet in sleeping dust, so we did without him for the most of the quest, until the sorcerer accidentally cast firewall for the second time and we failed [the first time he cast it we got the challenge of trying to complete the quest without being able to kill a single additional spider]; the fighter who thought he was immune to red blade barriers; I can't even tell you how many people won't stand still for heals or buffs, group or single. The blown traps...the levers hastily, stupidly, and against instructions pulled...the blood spattered pits in rainbow in the dark...this isn't even counting the gimped characters without adequate fortification, or whose low damage output other members may suspect but no one else can really quantify, or all the low hp characters out there and mana sponges only the healers can identify.

    Any guide for the type of person new enough to use a guide should emphasize the power of party balance to compensate for low individual power and/or poor form by all involved. Plan your best for the worst, be prepared for at least two party members to be entirely dysfunctional, and come well enough equipped for it not to matter. It really would help if the three or so competent players had complementary skill sets. Party balance (which is much more than just five melees waiting for a healer) should be emphasized. Being perpetually and catastrophically dead will not do anything for your xp/leveling/gaming experience, or help you fund your resist and cure pots, or underwater action and feather fall items bought from the auction house, etc.
    +1, Beautifully said. And the quote part in orange is priceless.

  15. #15
    Community Member cardmj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,314

    Default

    A nice simple guide with a few mistakes that other have pointed, but well done.

    A few pointers (some have been said):

    1. Hirelings can't be used in raids

    2. Wilderness areas are for 6 man parties with the exception of the SubT

    3. Use the social panel at it's full potential. A standard party make-up is a healer (cleric, favored soul, bard), a caster (sorceror, wizard, bard), a rogue (multiclasses usually), and 3 melees (paladin, fighter, barbarian, rogue or ranger). Though this is a standard party, it can be any set-up that the party leader wants (ie first come,-first serve, all rogue, vets only, zergers) but it would be wise to put a comment on the party advertisement as to what you want in your party make-up if it's significantly different from a regular party make-up or quest completion.

    4. When setting up the advertisement, make sure as party leader that you set the character levels appropiately for what you want in the party.

  16. #16
    Community Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    544

    Default

    Edited my block a bit then, though i said nothing regarding party make up. Really, not every quest requires an ideal party, and it can fluctuate quest by quest. For Gladewatch I usually like to get 1 Healer, 1 Spellcaster, 1 Sell-suffcient Melee, 1 Tank, 1 DPS, and 1 Support Healer. For Invaders I like 1 Healer, 1 Spellcaster, 1 DPS, and at least 2 characters that can do some form of Raise Dead. Etc. Plus someone said something about learning stuff with different group make ups and all that above somewhere.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This form's session has expired. You need to reload the page.

Reload