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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by MageLL View Post
    After the first 3 minutes of the first cd I was lost. The biggest thing is the exact same word annunciated in varying ways means something totally different.<CUT>
    I listened as carefully as possible to the pronunciation of the said word and meanings, but could barely tell any difference.
    I lived in Korea where no one spoke English and I could not eat without attempting to communicate in Korean. It took me at least 6 months of that before I could hear the difference between two of their "o" vowels. And Korean is not even a tonal language.

    The good news is that it doesn't make a heck of a lot of difference. Communication is a redundant system. If you get the pronunciation wrong, most people can easily and naturally figure out what you are trying to say via context, tone, and body language.

    For example, pick a sentence... any sentence. "I am going to the store to buy some apples." Now, say that out loud. Except, replace all the "a sounds with a "uh" sound. Would you have trouble understanding? Probably not. Now, make it worse by changing the "O" sounds to an "ah" sound. Would you have trouble understanding that? I doubt it.

    So, just give it a try. You'll pick a little more up every time.
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  2. #42
    Community Member Theadora's Avatar
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    I love this! My 4 1/2 yr old has been watching Ni Hao Kai-Lan on Nick Jr and keeps asking what different words are in Chinese. She loves that show. This may help me find more words to teach her. She is already exposed to Spanish through Dora and Diego and I have enough Spanish to help with naming items. She is also learning ASL a little to help her sister with her severe speech delay.

    Now to go searching for those flashcards that Caelan mentioned. Off to Amazon.

    Any suggestions for preschoolers? I can teach her the DDO terms but Daddy only loaded DDO on my side of our daughter's computer.
    Torchwood~Theadora~ Taea ~ Dizzydora

    Halfling Commandos~ Teodra~Maiah~Taeadora~Alystara

    It's all about the number of clerics.....

  3. #43
    Community Member Thailand_Dan's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Great idea! Great thread.

    When I started learning Thai at 28, I was told I was too old to learn, the language was impossible because of the 5 tones, etc, etc. When I finally reached conversation level, some Filipino friends said, "You've finally reached the second group of people. There are three types of people in the world: Multi-lingual, bi-lingual, and Americans." After 5 years of learning, I'm still not fluent, and doubt I'll ever be mistaken for a Thai (ie over the phone), but I can hold my own in a local conversation. (And FYI I am American, so not dissing).

    The things that seem to help the most is desire, practice, and immersion. If you don't really want to learn it, you won't. If you don't practice it, you won't remember it. Lastly, even if you learn it, if you don't use it frequently, you will forget it.

    Thx for the effort OP.

  4. #44
    Community Member Jakarr's Avatar
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    Very Good Thread, So nice to see Americans be civil about tryin to learn some of another lang, to help communition a little more.


    /bookmarked!
    Quote Originally Posted by Lorien_the_First_One View Post
    D&D promotes gang activity? Ya, because when I meet a bunch of Crypts I obviously assume they are all D20 players.
    What a stupid ruling, we all know that D&D promotes satanism, not gangs.
    In-Game Eldgrim The Gray-FvS Life Now

  5. #45
    Community Member RTN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HumanJHawkins View Post
    My understanding of this is that America was called "Beautiful Country" early on. And when America helped to defeat Japan, Korea (and possibly also and China) were quite happy with the "Beautiful Country" designation. However, Japan was not. Japan instead started using "Rice Country" because America was seen as a land of wealth and bounty. But they definitely did not want to call it beautiful.
    The "beikoku" (lit. Rice Country) for the US in Japanese comes from phonetic usages of Chinese style characters. The old written version for the US was a phonetical A-Me-Ri-Ka (a kanji for each syllable, not all in katakana like today). The "Me" (pronounced 'may') was the character for "rice." It has since been shortened to just the "me" symbol and "koku" (country) so while the literal meaning is "rice country" it comes from a phonetical use of the "me" symbol rather than using the meaning of the character. This is usually only used in written (newspapers, formal documents), not spoken or casual Japanese today with a few exceptions (i.e., don't introduce yourself as coming from "beikoku" as it will sound odd, even if it is technically correct).
    Last edited by RTN; 06-18-2008 at 10:02 PM.

  6. #46
    Hatchery Hero Dark_Helmet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aranticus View Post
    as far as i know, the official chinese name for US is mei guo 美国. the old name 米国 is commonly used as 美 in a chinese dialect is pronounced as 米 (bee (note: dialect, not hanyu pinyin). as for the japanese name, that i'm not too sure
    I spent a couple of years in Taiwan (only knew it phonetically so had to get it correct from the web):
    School was Měi gu&#243; xu&#233; xi&#224;o
    Right y&#242;u biān
    Left zuǒ biān
    Very good tǐng hǎo
    Very bad b&#249; hǎo
    Thank you zh&#236; xi&#232;
    Bye z&#224;i ji&#224;n
    I love you wǒ &#224;i nǐ

    Beyond that I can only recite commercials from TV
    Last edited by Dark_Helmet; 06-19-2008 at 12:29 AM.
    Oh, that's easy. I didn't farm them. I just cheated. -Meghan
    Quote Originally Posted by 404error View Post
    lol, I didnt give it a QA pass.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTN View Post
    The "beikoku" (lit. Rice Country) for the US in Japanese comes from phonetic usages of Chinese style characters. The old written version for the US was a phonetical A-Me-Ri-Ka (a kanji for each syllable, not all in katakana like today). The "Me" (pronounced 'may') was the character for "rice." It has since been shortened to just the "me" symbol and "koku" (country) so while the literal meaning is "rice country" it comes from a phonetical use of the "me" symbol rather than using the meaning of the character. This is usually only used in written (newspapers, formal documents), not spoken or casual Japanese today with a few exceptions (i.e., don't introduce yourself as coming from "beikoku" as it will sound odd, even if it is technically correct).
    I am sure you are correct. But I'm also pretty sure that this is the diplomatic explanation for decisions that were as political as when the U.S. congress attempted to rename french fries to "freedom fries". (Which was especially ironic, since the french actually dislike the term "french fry"... The french just call them fried potatores. lol.)

    By the way, whenever the U.S. would do something to annoy Korea (such as when a U.S. soldier would get accused of a crime against a Korean woman, and the U.S. would whisk him away so as not to face the Korean justice system). the Korean legislature would always start raising the issue of whether Korea should follow the Japanese lead and stop calling America "beautiful country". So I think politics is always involved.
    Nyr Dyv Raiders - Sarlona
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  8. #48
    Community Member Teech's Avatar
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    inputs =p

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark_Helmet View Post
    I spent a couple of years in Taiwan (only knew it phonetically so had to get it correct from the web):

    School was Měi guó xué xi*o
    mei guo xue xiao = American School
    xue xiao = school


    Right yòu biān
    you bian = right side

    Left zuǒ biān
    zuo bian = left side
    so, yes. bian = side
    for eg. pang bian = beside (physically next to)


    Very good tǐng hǎo
    ting hao = quite good
    hen hao = very good


    Very bad bù hǎo
    bu hao = not good
    bu = not


    Thank you zhì xiè
    zhi xie is more formal.
    most use 'xie xie'


    Bye z*i ji*n
    zai jian = see you again (lit)

    I love you wǒ *i nǐ

    Beyond that I can only recite commercials from TV

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caelan View Post
    okay... question about double vowels. do you pronoune them separate (like science is two syllables) or do you say one over the other (like pie you pronounce the i but not the e)? if you only pronounce one, which gets pronounced? first? second? changes?

    i ask because in your example of wait a while... deng(3) yi xia i was trying to figure out how to say the last word, xia. is it shee-ah... shah... shee-ay... shih-ah... shih-ay... shih...

    which brought up the next question... do vowels without any accent pronounce long or short. like yi from deng(3) yi xia. is it an i like in pin (yih) or an i like in pie (yie). because every time i see yi my instinct is to say yee. lol

    Edit: you were posting at the same time as me on the same subject... answering my questions... a little freaky
    xia would be pronounced more correctly as xee+ya combined into one sound close to something like "shia"
    If you want to know why...

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thailand_Dan View Post
    Great idea! Great thread.

    When I started learning Thai at 28, I was told I was too old to learn, the language was impossible because of the 5 tones, etc, etc. When I finally reached conversation level, some Filipino friends said, "You've finally reached the second group of people. There are three types of people in the world: Multi-lingual, bi-lingual, and Americans." After 5 years of learning, I'm still not fluent, and doubt I'll ever be mistaken for a Thai (ie over the phone), but I can hold my own in a local conversation. (And FYI I am American, so not dissing).

    The things that seem to help the most is desire, practice, and immersion. If you don't really want to learn it, you won't. If you don't practice it, you won't remember it. Lastly, even if you learn it, if you don't use it frequently, you will forget it.

    Thx for the effort OP.
    thai is 5 tones, i studied 2 terms of vietnamese ~ 7 tones. if you learnt cantonese (chinese dialect) its 9 tones
    If you want to know why...

  11. #51

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    Woot!!!!!


    Totw! :d
    If you want to know why...

  12. #52
    Community Member VonBek's Avatar
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    Well done!
    So, I hear that one day we may get Familiars...
    ....I want a Velociraptor!

  13. #53
    Founder lakeytw's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Aranticus View Post
    qing(3) ni(3) xiang(4) ning(3) mu(3) qin(1) wen(4) hao(3) - xiang = towards, ning = your, mu = female, qin = relative, wen = ask, meaning "please say hi to your mother for me"
    Lol yep gonna use that one... next plat seller spamming me

    qing(3) ni(3) xiang(4) ning(3) mu(3) qin(1) wen(4) hao(3)

  14. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caelan View Post
    thanks for the translations... [...snip...]

    i do have a question... i've been noticing some LFMs with what appears to be chinese words in the notation. has any of you who do speak/read the language know if it is and if that is basically that person's way of flagging that run as a chines-speaking run?
    zhong guo ren lai = Chinese people come
    zhong guo = China, Chinese

    I believe those are what you have seen in LFMs. Those Chinese groups are usually low levels and most of my characters are level 16s and I have not joined them to see what it is like.

    With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

  15. #55

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    maybe corduroy could arrange a podcast for me. since i'm the flavor of the week, it should send the ratings up the roof
    If you want to know why...

  16. #56
    Community Member tuskistt's Avatar
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    Cool

    thx for ur effort, but i noticed that some pinyins that u gave us are not correct.
    anyway urs r easier to be pronounced.

    ps: i can speak Mandarin cuz i was born in China and moved to Canada few yrs ago and i'm also part of those ppl who come from CN DDO.
    we really love to play DDO with ppl all over the world however most of us r unable to communicate in English
    so if anyone sees "Chinese only" or many weird words on the LFMs, plz dont think of us being racist...


    pps: i feel sorry that CN DDO servers have been closed for abt 2 months
    for those Chinese players who already paid the monthly fees of June n July n even Aug. and those who r addicted to DDO, here's the best choice other than JP DDO.

    again~thx guys we really appreciate it.

  17. #57
    Community Member Thailand_Dan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aranticus View Post
    thai is 5 tones, i studied 2 terms of vietnamese ~ 7 tones. if you learnt cantonese (chinese dialect) its 9 tones
    Yeah, 5 is rough, 7 would be worse. I thought Cantonese was 11, but I think a few of the tones are rarely used. Working in the region, I could usually pick out what language they were speaking, even if I didn't understand it:

    - "Blah blah soy-o" - Korean
    - "Shar-Shar-Shar" - Beijing Mandarin
    - Sounds like Chinese but more argumentative - Cantonese
    - "Blah Blah Bong sah-bong" - Khumer
    - "Blah Blah Maass" - Japanese
    - Sounds like Spanish but isn't - Tagalog
    Thai is the easiest to pick out. In polite conversation, they end their sentences with krap (for men) or kah (for women).

    Not trying to be funny or critical, just being factual about what it sounds like to most Western ears.

    I know I'm a bit off topic...sorry.

  18. #58
    Community Member gpk's Avatar
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    How do you say "zomg noob you didn't pull the lever!"

  19. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by tuskistt View Post
    thx for ur effort, but i noticed that some pinyins that u gave us are not correct.
    anyway urs r easier to be pronounced.

    ps: i can speak Mandarin cuz i was born in China and moved to Canada few yrs ago and i'm also part of those ppl who come from CN DDO.
    we really love to play DDO with ppl all over the world however most of us r unable to communicate in English
    so if anyone sees "Chinese only" or many weird words on the LFMs, plz dont think of us being racist...


    pps: i feel sorry that CN DDO servers have been closed for abt 2 months
    for those Chinese players who already paid the monthly fees of June n July n even Aug. and those who r addicted to DDO, here's the best choice other than JP DDO.

    again~thx guys we really appreciate it.
    there can be variations from country to country, so if you could, please post the version that is more accepted in yours, this way we can compare and learn from each other
    If you want to know why...

  20. #60

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    Lesson 4: Greetings (in general)

    zao(3) an(1): zao = early, an = safe, meaning "good morning"

    wu(3) an(1): wu = noon, meaning "good afternoon"

    wan(3) an(1): wan = late, meaning "good night"

    ni(3) chi(1) bao(3) le(4) ma(1): chi = eat, bao = full, meaning "have you eaten?"

    xin(4) hui(4): "pleased to" (usually, xin hui xin hui is used to mean "pleased to meet you")

    hen(3) gao(1) xing(4) ren(4) shi(4) ni(3): hen = very, gao = high, xing = happy, ren shi = know, meaning "pleased to meet you"

    ni(3) hia(2) hao(3) ba(4): hai = are, ba = question ending, meaning "are you well?"
    If you want to know why...

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