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Ghoste
08-17-2007, 12:39 PM
Races of Eberron - it's a book.

Katrina
08-17-2007, 12:43 PM
Cool thanks man!
I figured it would be a source book :D
*adds to wish-list of sourcebooks*

Ananvil
09-05-2007, 03:01 PM
Another Question if you'll excuse the double post... The Drow of Forgotten realms incur heavy penalties when roaming the realms outside the Underdark. If the Drow of Eberron are not similarly bound to the lightless world what is their origin?

Also, the Drow have developed a sort of eyedrop that allows them to function normally in daylight.

CrazySamaritan
12-02-2007, 09:53 PM
Also, the Drow have developed a sort of eyedrop that allows them to function normally in daylight.
Only for DDO, presumebly because the same features which make it possible for the rogues to be stealthed with one eye in broad daylight and many eyes in a dank sewer prevents functional use of the light dizziness penalty.

There are no sourcebooks supporting the loss of light sensitivity for drow.

MysticTheurge
12-02-2007, 10:15 PM
There are no sourcebooks supporting the loss of light sensitivity for drow.

I thought there was a feat that let you essentially buy away Light Sensitivity, but I'm not finding it, so maybe I'm either making it up or it was from a non-canonical source.

neoanderthal
02-05-2008, 11:48 AM
I thought there was a feat that let you essentially buy away Light Sensitivity, but I'm not finding it, so maybe I'm either making it up or it was from a non-canonical source.

The feat is Daylight Adaptation, and it can be found in Races of Eberron, p. 108

neoanderthal
02-05-2008, 11:53 AM
I'm curious as to which source was used for the information on Aeren's use of blood magic and her subsequent death. Perhaps I skipped over it, but I haven't seen mention of such a thing in any Dragonshards article or Eberron source book. Was it in an issue of Dragon? Per this article (http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ebds/20050530a) written by Keith Baker, Aeren died from a wasting disease in transit from Xen'drik to the land that would be named after her.

CrazySamaritan
02-05-2008, 02:54 PM
Yes, that article deals with one way that Aeren is to have considered dying. However, depending on who you ask, Aeren also made it to Aerenal, and was one of the first Deathless, or Never left Xen'drick, dying to give the rest of the elves a last chance to escape.


However, I have not heard of the blood magic version of events yet.

MysticTheurge
02-05-2008, 03:11 PM
I believe it's in Magic of Eberron, though I don't have the book in front of me to check.

CrazySamaritan
02-05-2008, 03:19 PM
As all good legends do, the Aereni story begins with a hero, an elf slave named Aeren Kriaddal.
Aeren served a powerful giant shaman for the greater part of his life. Eventually earning the mighty creature’s trust, Aeren was allowed to observe and even aid in the giant’s most potent rituals. Through this participation, he learned to cast simple spells. One day, Aeren was ordered by his master to retrieve
the day’s sacrifices for the ritual. Kept in a small pen near the giant’s house, these sacrifices typically consisted of livestock or captured wild animals. This day, however, Aeren opened the door to the large pen and found that it contained only a single small figure: an unconscious
female elf. In a numb daze, Aeren took the elf slowly back to his master’s abode. His conditioning was too thorough for him to do anything else, and on some level, he doubted his master meant to slaughter his fellow elf simply for his magic. Aeren’s assumption was wrong.

The giant shaman plunged a knife—a weapon the size of a large sword in an elf’s hands—into the elf, spilling her blood to power a potent magical ritual. Horror struck Aeren just as cruelly.

The magic released by the sacrificial ritual was more potent than any Aeren had seen his master perform before. Despite his shock at the death of the sacrifice, the portion of his mind fascinated with magic took note of the power released by the sacrifice of an elf (as opposed to that of a mere beast). But the betrayal of his trust in the giant seeded a new thought into Aeren’s mind: revolt.

Aeren began to carefully and slowly build a secret contingent of like-minded slaves, including a few who were eager pupils of the magic Aeren could teach. From these unpromising beginnings, the revolution nurtured the seeds of magical lore, and slowly expanded it with
each passing year. Eventually, the elves began magical experiments of their own. The slaves at first recorded their trials and successes on pilfered scraps of parchment and leather, but the thefts were too risky—the giants might find them out. Instead, they found that their own
blood was an ideal ink, and the bones of their own dead served as a perfect record of their findings. The giants suspected nothing.

Aeren never forgot the power unleashed by the sacrifice of one of their own race, and he conducted his own secret experiments apart from those of his conspirators, always seeking to unleash the power of blood. He had no desire to sacrifice his own people for any reason, but he felt that he was close to recognizing some key element. Aeren’s giant master felt the same way. Many more elves passed across the giant shaman’s sacrificial altar, but to no greater effect. Those who were sacrificed wailed in their chains if conscious, asking for release, or fought wildly to avoid the drugs that would render them mutely accepting of the giant shaman’s sacrificial knife.

With a flash of intuition, Aeren finally recognized the missing element one day after a particularly vicious sacrifice. Each victim was unwilling. Even when unconscious or drugged, the slaves’ souls cried out for life, not death. Aeren’s insight fi red him with steely determination. In
the wake of his hard-won knowledge, it was finally time to initiate the elves’ escape from Xen’drik.

Aeren shared his theories on the power of sacrifice with the trusted core of his secret movement. With this precious knowledge, they hatched a daring plan for the elves to escape the captivity of the giants. But secrecy, even among the elf slaves, was vital, lest betrayal ruin all their years of hidden labor. Of all the thousands of elves held in captivity, Aeren selected only one hundred others to share the magical knowledge necessary to free the elves, as well as the exact time of the escape.

When the appointed day of freedom came, Aeren walked into his master’s chambers. All across Xen’drik, his cohort of conspirators did the same. They all spoke the final words of a terrible ritual, prepared in advance over many months. The ritual was powered by the sacrifice of all the collected elf heroes. In that instant, all these participating elves, scattered across the continent in key locations, gave up their lives.

Mighty detonations of power were born flaming into the world. Giant citadels fell, towns were expunged of their giant populations—and elves everywhere saw the signal. Led by agents of Aeren and his inner circle, the elf slaves slipped away in the tumult.

During the Flight of the Slaves, as the elves call their exodus, a powerful, mysterious elf cleared the way for the fl eeing elves of Xen’drik, diverting giant patrols, guiding lost groups of elves, and even obliterating obstacles (giant or otherwise) in displays of blazing power. Upon arriving at the coast, the freed slaves discovered a journal, prepared by Aeren and placed within a platinum urn. Carried to the
shore by an unwitting messenger, the journal documented the ritual that resulted in the great sacrifice of the elf heroes, as well as Aeren’s notes on the rite the elves eventually came to call the Ritual of Undying.

Aeren, unlike the other heroes, did not perish. The influx of magical energy sustained his existence even as it ended his biological life. He was transformed into the first of the undying.

neoanderthal
02-05-2008, 03:45 PM
As all good legends do, the Aereni story begins with a hero, an elf slave named Aeren Kriaddal.
Aeren served a powerful giant shaman for the greater part of his life...

Interesting, so not only does the origin of Aerenal change, but Aeren's gender changes, too? Wow. Magic of Eberron? I guess that's one book I can cross off of my list.

Odd that such a long-lived race would forget the truth about their origins after 78 generations (give or take), particularly with a culture that reveres the deeds of their ancestors, and seeks to keep their knowledge and spirit from being lost to Dolurrh.

MysticTheurge
02-05-2008, 03:49 PM
Interesting, so not only does the origin of Aerenal change, but Aeren's gender changes, too? Wow. Magic of Eberron? I guess that's one book I can cross off of my list...

It's actually a pretty good book. Good mix of crunch and fluff.

And Keith Baker has answers for why the legends change so drastically, I just don't remember them off the top of my head. (I think it boils down to "legends are really old and no one remembers for sure" but you could check WotC's AKB thread(s) to be sure.)

neoanderthal
02-05-2008, 04:13 PM
It's actually a pretty good book. Good mix of crunch and fluff.

And Keith Baker has answers for why the legends change so drastically, I just don't remember them off the top of my head. (I think it boils down to "legends are really old and no one remembers for sure" but you could check WotC's AKB thread(s) to be sure.)

If the fluff is as revisionist as that, I'll pass, thanks.
Legends among humans with short lifespans and not much interest in preserving their past, I'd buy. Varying 'legends' amongst a race that lives 500+ years and makes it a point to preserve their dead in an undying state? BS.

Anyhow, bitterness aside, thanks for the answers :)

MysticTheurge
02-05-2008, 06:37 PM
If the fluff is as revisionist as that, I'll pass, thanks.

The two bits were, if I remember correctly, actually written fairly close to "at the same time."

And, again if I remember correctly, that's the only inconsistency.

Ghaldar
03-09-2008, 03:27 PM
I just got home from the cheapo used book store.....I came across the following: "Lords of Madness", "Five Nations", and Eberron Explorer's handbook......for a total $28.23 I was out the door with all 3! As I was riding home listening to the wife /whine about my stupid " nerd" books I was reading up on some Aberration lore......


Side Bar on page 6 of the Lords of Madness. Baker, Jacobs, Winter. WoTC 2005. Contains and I am paraphrasing......Race of daelkyr invaded Eberron(yea knew that) from Xoriat. They brought with them their lieutenants Mind Flayers (hrmm did not realize that or forgot about that).......making mind flayers extra planar aberrations. Now Marut can be banished in game as it is from another plane, hard to do but can be done with banishment spell and uber gaming l337 sauce(see MACSDF:CCG for l337 sauce definition) Never tried banish on a flayer, anyone else try? Stands to reason that we should be able to banish them. Other aberrations where created on this plane by the daelkyr, so the are of this plane, I assume. But flayers are not. In the DDO game are flayers extraplanar or not? Can we banish them with spell?

EspyLacopa
03-09-2008, 03:52 PM
I just got home from the cheapo used book store.....I came across the following: "Lords of Madness", "Five Nations", and Eberron Explorer's handbook......for a total $28.23 I was out the door with all 3! As I was riding home listening to the wife /whine about my stupid " nerd" books I was reading up on some Aberration lore......


Side Bar on page 6 of the Lords of Madness. Baker, Jacobs, Winter. WoTC 2005. Contains and I am paraphrasing......Race of daelkyr invaded Eberron(yea knew that) from Xoriat. They brought with them their lieutenants Mind Flayers (hrmm did not realize that or forgot about that).......making mind flayers extra planar aberrations. Now Marut can be banished in game as it is from another plane, hard to do but can be done with banishment spell and uber gaming l337 sauce(see MACSDF:CCG for l337 sauce definition) Never tried banish on a flayer, anyone else try? Stands to reason that we should be able to banish them. Other aberrations where created on this plane by the daelkyr, so the are of this plane, I assume. But flayers are not. In the DDO game are flayers extraplanar or not? Can we banish them with spell?
Originally, perhaps but I think they've hung around Eberron long enough now that they've since lost their ExtraPlanar bit. They aren't immortal like the Daelkyr.

ZarakNur
03-22-2008, 06:08 AM
Here's one for you (it's about the Eberron setting, not DDO):

What year was New Cyre established?

Thanks!

ZarakNur
04-01-2008, 09:08 AM
No bites huh?

Guess i'll have to make an educated guess.

I wrote to Keith Baker: No reply
I wrote on the Eberron boards: Nothing
Nothing here...

Ah well.

MysticTheurge
04-01-2008, 09:12 AM
Sorry,

I haven't really been paying attention to this (older) Loremaster thread as much.

I'm not sure on the exact year of the founding of New Cyre (I'm not sure the date was actually given in any of the sourcebooks), but you can be sure it happened after the Mourning (so 996-998 YK). I'd err on the side of earlier, so 996 or 996.

geoffhanna
05-20-2008, 04:53 PM
What monster type are Sahaugin?

Do they exist in Eberron lore too? I always thought of them as Greyhawk bad guys.

[oops posted in wrong thread will post in 2.o]

Vorn
05-20-2008, 04:57 PM
What monster type are Sahaugin?

Do they exist in Eberron lore too? I always thought of them as Greyhawk bad guys.

http://www.d20srd.org/srd/monsters/sahuagin.htm

Monsterous humanoid

There's some ocean area just north of Stormreach that is a sea reputedly filled with Sahaugin and pirates and sea monsters, oh my!

Mallets
09-27-2010, 10:51 AM
This is brilliant!

Seems no one has posted here in a while. A shame more folks aren't stopping by and giving "kudos".

Fantastic job Mystic! The effort put into this is amazing. Well done!!!

Lorien_the_First_One
09-27-2010, 11:02 AM
This is brilliant!

Seems no one has posted here in a while. A shame more folks aren't stopping by and giving "kudos".

Fantastic job Mystic! The effort put into this is amazing. Well done!!!

Sadly I believe MT left the game.