PDA

View Full Version : Give us some insight into the "change" process



Khurse
09-24-2010, 12:00 PM
I'm wondering if (in a Myddo post or something) we could get some insight into how Turbine looks at things they feel need to be nerfed (or changed).
Not expecting all inclusive discourse that deals with everything, but (for example)
It was noticed that the tooltip for Slayer Arrows had been changed to match the description of the TOD change.
Eladrin then explained that it was something they considered, but decided against, and just forgot to change the tooltip back.

The thing is though, this would seem to indicate that someone at Turbine actually looked at Slayer arrows and ranged combat and said "this might be too powerful", the team would have then had to dedicate some resources to implementing at least one change to the arrows, tested them, then gone back and decided that in fact the arrows weren't overpowered at all.


So I'm curious, we've seen changes/nerfs that have both made sense, and changes that have(to the majority of players) not made sense. Is there anyway we can get some insight on how the decision process is made?

Pugsley
09-24-2010, 05:08 PM
Gameplay data is a big part of it. They track everything.

I'm not familiar with slaying arrows being changed so I can't really speculate beyond that.

Angelus_dead
09-25-2010, 11:28 AM
this would seem to indicate that someone at Turbine actually looked at Slayer arrows and ranged combat and said "this might be too powerful"
It doesn't really mean that. There can be other motives for a change aside from reducing power, primarily verisimilitude.


The thing is though, this would seem to indicate that someone at Turbine actually looked at Slayer arrows and ranged combat and said "this might be too powerful"
Slaying arrows are indeed too powerful in comparison to all ranged weapon damage that doesn't have Slaying arrows.


the team would have then had to dedicate some resources to implementing at least one change to the arrows, tested them, then gone back and decided that in fact the arrows weren't overpowered at all.
There's no reason they had to have got to the point of programming something, or used power as the basis for conclusions.