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ducimus
12-16-2009, 10:28 AM
Could you use a 24 hour clock when providing updates or guidance on down-times?

Bunker
12-16-2009, 10:37 AM
Are you saying they should spam the "World will be closing" message in game for 24 hours?

Letrii
12-16-2009, 04:20 PM
He means he can't figure out that 12pm is noon and not midnight I think. We had quite a few people in Harbor chat that were having trouble with such a simple concept, go figure. This is after explaining it several times over 10 minutes.

adamkatt
12-16-2009, 04:24 PM
He means he can't figure out that 12pm is noon and not midnight I think. We had quite a few people in Harbor chat that were having trouble with such a simple concept, go figure. This is after explaining it several times over 10 minutes.

Thats really too bad if they didnt know 12pm is noon and 12am is midnight...

whysper
12-16-2009, 04:28 PM
He means he can't figure out that 12pm is noon and not midnight I think. We had quite a few people in Harbor chat that were having trouble with such a simple concept, go figure. This is after explaining it several times over 10 minutes.

Folks from .eu and, well, the entire civilised world often have problems trying to understand the obsolete, illogical and inconsistent measuring systems used in the U.S.

adamkatt
12-16-2009, 09:49 PM
Folks from .eu and, well, the entire civilised world often have problems trying to understand the obsolete, illogical and inconsistent measuring systems used in the U.S.

There are other civilized countries other than the US?? In the US they teach Standard AM/PM and Mititary.. i mean what else is there?? 3rd world sundials?

Letrii
12-16-2009, 09:59 PM
Stardate

Bunker
12-16-2009, 09:59 PM
Ahhhh, well that is an easy fix.

http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/bla/lowres/blan21l.jpg

tfangel
12-16-2009, 10:05 PM
Folks from .eu and, well, the entire civilised world often have problems trying to understand the obsolete, illogical and inconsistent measuring systems used in the U.S.

Yeah, it's all cubits this and barleycorn that. Not to mention how we still use the gilbert and hogshead. ;)

I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.

/shrug

Lirial
12-16-2009, 10:22 PM
Things that make America so dam great :) Striving for Originality!

centurionaramis
12-16-2009, 10:30 PM
I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.

..I'd say it really makes the most sense to do Year-Month-Day, the total reverse of that^.

I mean, it uses the same logic as Hours:Minutes:Seconds, and it makes each day increase the whole number in order. (2009-11-30 comes before 2009-12-01; 2009-12-31 comes before 2010-01-01) What's not to like about that? D:

Whenever the forum options to php customize time display, I can never go wrong by making it Year-Month-Day, 24Hour:Minute:Second.

melkor1702
12-16-2009, 10:32 PM
Yeah, it's all cubits this and barleycorn that. Not to mention how we still use the gilbert and hogshead. ;)

I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.

/shrug

How about all the others like gallons, ounces, yards, miles etc (S.I. Units FTW).

and the various differences to the spelling of words (and that doesn't even count for the people who can't spell) ;)

Lorien_the_First_One
12-16-2009, 10:35 PM
..I'd say it really makes the most sense to do Year-Month-Day, the total reverse of that^.

I mean, it uses the same logic as Hours:Minutes:Seconds, and it makes each day increase the whole number in order. (2009-11-30 comes before 2009-12-01; 2009-12-31 comes before 2010-01-01) What's not to like about that? D:

Whenever the forum options to php customize time display, I can never go wrong by making it Year-Month-Day, 24Hour:Minute:Second.

DD:MM:YY stems from the old christian scholars who recorded things as "on this 14th day of the 6th month of the year of our lord 1234"

YY:MM:DD is the more logical and consistant way to render it.

Letrii
12-16-2009, 10:42 PM
Using YY:MM:DD would be bad since the prominent feature is one that changes so slow. Not an issue with time since hours change fairly quickly and are usually the first thing you need to know anyway.

centurionaramis
12-16-2009, 10:47 PM
Using YY:MMD would be bad since the prominent feature is one that changes so slow. Not an issue with time since hours change fairly quickly and are usually the first thing you need to know anyway.

Ah, well yeah, I do see some points in that. I guess I just have an affinity/obsession for mere aesthetic order.

Letrii
12-16-2009, 10:49 PM
Military background to an extent, so I go 20Dec09.

uhgungawa
12-16-2009, 11:08 PM
Folks from .eu and, well, the entire civilised world often have problems trying to understand the obsolete, illogical and inconsistent measuring systems used in the U.S.

Well, if they don't like it they could always go back to the EU servers and Codemasters :eek:

OK, that was low. Nobody should go back to Codemasters. But they sure as hell better learn to use our system if they want to be here, and not expect us to have to cater to their inabilities to tell time :p

whysper
12-16-2009, 11:12 PM
OK, that was low. Nobody should go back to Codemasters. But they sure as hell better learn to use our system if they want to be here, and not expect us to have to cater to their inabilities to tell time :p

The U.S. officially should be using the SI system for measures. So, yes, someone needs to do some learnin' ;)

tfangel
12-16-2009, 11:46 PM
How about all the others like gallons, ounces, yards, miles etc (S.I. Units FTW).

I personally prefer the metric version, base 10, easy to figure out. I have never been able to figure out gallons, ounces, etc., but that could be my dyscalculia. :P

uhgungawa
12-16-2009, 11:46 PM
The U.S. officially should be using the SI system for measures. So, yes, someone needs to do some learnin' ;)

We bees the way we bees. Ya don't like it, go else wear. :D

sirgog
12-17-2009, 12:41 AM
Thats really too bad if they didnt know 12pm is noon and 12am is midnight...

These terms aren't used in Australia, instead people say 12 noon or 12 midnight, precisely because that is unambiguous and clear to anyone.

I have to think about which one someone means if they say 12am. (It's clear when you think of the 12 as a 0, then it fits perfectly. you have 0am before 1am)

Letrii
12-17-2009, 05:49 AM
The U.S. officially should be using the SI system for measures. So, yes, someone needs to do some learnin' ;)

Them's fightin wurds.

ducimus
12-17-2009, 12:53 PM
A simple little note has generated mucho discussion. Just trying to make things a little more standardized in an asynchronous environment that spans the globe! While those who posted derisive comments may find themselves clever, the rest generally find you tiresome and predictable. What would truly have an impact is cogent discussion.

So it goes.

Slorgs
12-17-2009, 01:09 PM
We bees the way we bees. Ya don't like it, go else wear. :D


"Give me five bees for a quarter," you'd say.

Now where were we? Oh yeah: the important thing was I had an onion on my belt, which was the style at the time. They didn't have white onions because of the war. The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.

And that's why americans don't use metric system.

Pizzasoup
12-17-2009, 01:11 PM
Well, I wouldn't mind a 24-hour clock, exactly, and while I understand that the rest of the world does run differently, this game is U.S.-based, no? It'd therefore make sense to have a clock system that U.S. citizens are more comfortable with.

Wudwaen
12-17-2009, 02:52 PM
He means he can't figure out that 12pm is noon and not midnight I think. We had quite a few people in Harbor chat that were having trouble with such a simple concept, go figure. This is after explaining it several times over 10 minutes.

Not everyone in the world uses United States time, and the 24 Hour clock is more precise and meaningful. When I first went to college, after being in the military, a friend ask for help moving his family. I said, "Sure" and he ask me to be there around 7:00. I was. I knocked on the door and he answered in his robe, apologized, told me to raid for cereal and enjoy cartoons with the kid until they got up. I asked, "Didn't you say you were going to start moving about seve?" He said,"Well, we were thinking 7:00 p.m., it didn't occur to us anyone would get up before noon on a Saturday." I only use military time in my house - twenty years later. I don't have a problem converting, but if I were dictator I would eliminate the use of the 12 hour clock system left over from the time they were still deciding what letters would be in the first alphabet.


Yeah, it's all cubits this and barleycorn that. Not to mention how we still use the gilbert and hogshead. ;)
I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.
Actually, day/month/year is exactly backwards. The reason you place a comma following the day, is because it is placed out of sequence. Correct dating is year-month-day. This is the standard for the CE (Common Era) and derives from the AD (Anno Domini) system (ie. In the Year of Our Lord 2009 in the month of December on the 17th day was this written). With the conversion from a religion specific dating, now used commonly in places that do not follow that religion, the new dating system is BCE (Before the Common Era) and CE (Common Era).


Folks from .eu and, well, the entire civilised world often have problems trying to understand the obsolete, illogical and inconsistent measuring systems used in the U.S.Um, trust me from personal experience as a hobbiest and cook, metric measures are not the same all over the world. Just because the knitting needle says 10 mm does not mean it is a US 15. Also, Canada, Australia, England, and France are all metric - but their recipes do not convert to US measure the same.


But they sure as hell better learn to use our system if they want to be here, and not expect us to have to cater to their inabilities to tell time :pI am assuming that is in part jest. Especially since in point of fact, they are not here, they are at "home" in their own country. However, I have a multicultural background. Should I insist that Americans give up this foreign derived "Stuff" and start using one of my ancestor's Native Calendar? Might be amusing to watch the US adapt to a 5 day week with no weekends, or for that matter an 11 tone musical scale. US hegemony is near over, and the day is ending when we can continue to force everyone else to speak our language and culture because we choose to remain ignorant of theirs.

melkor1702
12-17-2009, 04:20 PM
US hegemony is near over, and the day is ending when we can continue to force everyone else to speak our language and culture because we choose to remain ignorant of theirs.

It's actually England's language, the US has just bastardised it.

Hence why the spell checker wants me to use "bastardized"

melkor1702
12-17-2009, 05:40 PM
Um, trust me from personal experience as a hobbiest and cook, metric measures are not the same all over the world. Just because the knitting needle says 10 mm does not mean it is a US 15. Also, Canada, Australia, England, and France are all metric - but their recipes do not convert to US measure the same.



oh and I missed this bit before. The metric system is the same all over the world, it is clearly defined

http://www.bipm.org/en/si/base_units/

The biggest variations come from confusing the imperial system of measurement with the US Customary measurement systems which share common names examples of which are

1 US Gallon is approx 3.8 litres
1 Imperial Gallon is approx 4.5 litres

Similar differences occur for ounces/pints/quarts as well.

YakoSpiritFist
12-17-2009, 05:44 PM
Don't listen to him! He's with the people that want to make a one world order. He probably helped come up with the Euro to. :P

melkor1702
12-17-2009, 05:58 PM
Don't listen to him! He's with the people that want to make a one world order. He probably helped come up with the Euro to. :P

All hail the Great and Mystical Koala.

When you have all been converted we will all be trading goods and services for gum leaves. :rolleyes:

Wudwaen
12-17-2009, 06:04 PM
It's actually England's language, the US has just bastardised it.
Hence why the spell checker wants me to use "bastardized"

Actually, it is not your language. I speak American although English is also understood. The Prince of Wales does not determine what is permissible in the American lexicon as he does the English one. Nor has he advocated the use of our native words. My mother speaks Cajun, which is by no means French, but influenced from Native Languages, Spanish, and German on the biblical French of the King Louis XIV Bible. In the same way, American is not English.


oh and I missed this bit before. The metric system is the same all over the world, it is clearly defined
http://www.bipm.org/en/si/base_units/
The biggest variations come from confusing the imperial system of measurement with the US Customary measurement systems which share common names examples of which are:
1 US Gallon is approx 3.8 litres
1 Imperial Gallon is approx 4.5 litres
Similar differences occur for ounces/pints/quarts as well.
I am, as a historian, familiar with a number of changes in measuring systems. One cannot compare changes in taxation without observing differences in standardization. However, I have had to deal with multiple meanings of terms in metric created by the differences in terms from the original conversion. As I quote here:

http://www.france-property-and-information.com/cooking_converter.htm
"Finally, for these smaller measures, the Imperial measures are interpreted slightly differently between the different countries (UK, Canada, Australia, etc.)"

The final result, the metric measures do not end up being the same. The required amount of leavening for the same bread recipe becomes different depending on which country the recipe was converted through.

melkor1702
12-17-2009, 07:27 PM
Actually, it is not your language. I speak American although English is also understood. The Prince of Wales does not determine what is permissible in the American lexicon as he does the English one. Nor has he advocated the use of our native words. My mother speaks Cajun, which is by no means French, but influenced from Native Languages, Spanish, and German on the biblical French of the King Louis XIV Bible. In the same way, American is not English.

Last time I checked the Prince of Wales does not determine what is permissible in the English lexicon either.
You do indeed speak English; you speak "American" English just like Australians speak "Australian" English, New Zealanders speak "New Zealand" English. They are all subsets of the English language that have been influenced by local cultural differences, immigration policies, history etc, but they are all still English. English itself is heavily influenced and based in Germanic, Latin and ancient Greek.

If in doubt check the USA Government website the official language of the USA spoken by over 81% of the population is "English"



I am, as a historian, familiar with a number of changes in measuring systems. One cannot compare changes in taxation without observing differences in standardization. However, I have had to deal with multiple meanings of terms in metric created by the differences in terms from the original conversion. As I quote here:

http://www.france-property-and-information.com/cooking_converter.htm
"Finally, for these smaller measures, the Imperial measures are interpreted slightly differently between the different countries (UK, Canada, Australia, etc.)"

The final result, the metric measures do not end up being the same. The required amount of leavening for the same bread recipe becomes different depending on which country the recipe was converted through.

No your quote agrees with me, the metric volumes are the same, it the Imperial measures that are interpreted differently. If the recipe is calling for an ounce you need to figure out which countries ounce you need. Litres, grams etc are constant no matter which country is using them. The only thing that can make them vary is temperature, atmospheric pressures and those sorts of variables change a US ounce or UK ounce too.

Letrii
12-18-2009, 01:12 AM
Not everyone in the world uses United States time, and the 24 Hour clock is more precise and meaningful.

How is 1200 more precise or meaningful than 12pm? Both mean the exact same thing and the precision is based on the measurement of said time. Just because some people don't understand both systems makes no difference in its precision or meaningfulness.

Wudwaen
12-18-2009, 01:24 AM
Last time I checked the Prince of Wales does not determine what is permissible in the English lexicon either.
You do indeed speak English; you speak "American" English just like Australians speak "Australian" English, New Zealanders speak "New Zealand" English. They are all subsets of the English language that have been influenced by local cultural differences, immigration policies, history etc, but they are all still English. English itself is heavily influenced and based in Germanic, Latin and ancient Greek.

If in doubt check the USA Government website the official language of the USA spoken by over 81% of the population is "English"
And the US of A government still treats ethnicity by race and ethnicity by culture as one and the same entity. While authoritative in matters of law, government is not inherently accurate in defining reality. Americans do not speak English. Nor are we subjects of anything English, except as we choose to apply to ourselves those inheritances from our ancestors who were brutalized and persecuted for not being the *approved* Englishman. Sadly, the English do not have a cornerstone on that market, which is why the heritage of the US of A is opened (self-inclusive) from all corners of the world where any drop of blood was shed by any of our ancestors in protest, defiance, and suffering. American is no longer English just as Ebonics is no longer American and Mexican (with up to 60% of its lexicon being Native American) is not Castellano or even properly Andalusian.


No your quote agrees with me, the metric volumes are the same, it the Imperial measures that are interpreted differently. If the recipe is calling for an ounce you need to figure out which countries ounce you need. Litres, grams etc are constant no matter which country is using them. The only thing that can make them vary is temperature, atmospheric pressures and those sorts of variables change a US ounce or UK ounce too.
The metric volumes are supposed to be the same, but they are not always perfectly so. As I mentioned, the [u]Same[u] recipe comes through the conversions differently depending on which country converted it. Someplace in one of my boxes of books I have a conversion section for the recipes that deals with converting according to source of the metric measure. While metric is supposed to be exactly and perfectly identical all the time, it is not so. The same difficulty exists in crochet and knitting needles which sized the same in metric are not the same size.

whysper
12-18-2009, 05:22 AM
How is 1200 more precise or meaningful than 12.00pm?

Fixed your inaccurate comparison first, which neatly pivots to the very simple reason: there is only one 12:00 (or 11:00) in a day, not two.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23.

See? Just one. :)

Ereshkigal
12-18-2009, 05:37 AM
..I'd say it really makes the most sense to do Year-Month-Day, the total reverse of that^.

I mean, it uses the same logic as Hours:Minutes:Seconds, and it makes each day increase the whole number in order. (2009-11-30 comes before 2009-12-01; 2009-12-31 comes before 2010-01-01) What's not to like about that? D:

Whenever the forum options to php customize time display, I can never go wrong by making it Year-Month-Day, 24Hour:Minute:Second.

yea I prefer year,month,day myself.

MissErres
12-18-2009, 06:00 AM
This is worse than DDO math.... :rolleyes:

Razcar
12-18-2009, 06:16 AM
Even if the measuring systems used in North America are in my view both illogical and antiquated - just like the ones used in the UK - at least you guys don't drive at the left side of the road. Something tells me though that if the metric system wouldn't had been invented in France both you and the Brits would had thrown out your gallons, yards, stone and furlongs long ago :p


He means he can't figure out that 12pm is noon and not midnight I think. We had quite a few people in Harbor chat that were having trouble with such a simple concept, go figure. This is after explaining it several times over 10 minutes.
I'm sorry that the marvel that is the internet has sneaked some of that huge, scary and diversified world out there into your very backyard. ;)


We bees the way we bees. Ya don't like it, go else wear. :D Ya don't like the world, go else wear :D

Borror0
12-18-2009, 07:11 AM
Even if the measuring systems used in North America are in my view both illogical and antiquated [...]
That's false. At least some North Americans have upgraded to better systems...

Razcar
12-18-2009, 07:22 AM
That's false. At least some North Americans have upgraded to better systems...Yeah, well science and the military. Although when I last vistited the States - this summer - I saw more metric designations on consumer products than I was used to in previous visits. I suppose it could be slowly gaining ground.

chubbs99
12-18-2009, 07:35 AM
I'm actually kinda supprised nobody has mentioned that Turbine always makes their time relative to GMT

Scheduled Server Downtime: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST (-5 GMT) Wednesday, December 16th
Granted Time zone hopping trying to figure out your time relative to the time zone listed can be a royal pain, but they make it easy for you by listing the GMT offset... then it just becomes a mater of actually knowing the offset for the time zone your in.

(ie. 10:00am - 12:00pm + 5hrs = 3:00pm - 5:00pm +/- your offset)
If you convert the times to 24hr in your head the math involved becomes really simple.

Now, what might be usefull is on the forum home page, above the "Sales & Promotions" box if they had a box with the local server time at turbine (server time) it would remove any doubt from anyones mind about when something is happening

Borror0
12-18-2009, 07:55 AM
Yeah, well science and the military. Although when I last vistited the States - this summer - I saw more metric designations on consumer products than I was used to in previous visits. I suppose it could be slowly gaining ground.
...you do know that Canada is also part of North America, right? Or, do you think Canadians are all soldiers and scientists? :p

EDIT: Mexico also probably uses the SI, and is also part of North America, but I am not 100% sure.

MissErres
12-18-2009, 08:00 AM
I'm actually kinda supprised nobody has mentioned that Turbine always makes their time relative to GMT

Granted Time zone hopping trying to figure out your time relative to the time zone listed can be a royal pain, but they make it easy for you by listing the GMT offset... then it just becomes a mater of actually knowing the offset for the time zone your in.

(ie. 10:00am - 12:00pm + 5hrs = 3:00pm - 5:00pm +/- your offset)
If you convert the times to 24hr in your head the math involved becomes really simple.

Now, what might be usefull is on the forum home page, above the "Sales & Promotions" box if they had a box with the local server time at turbine (server time) it would remove any doubt from anyones mind about when something is happening

I was going to mention it, but all the talk about litres, miles and quasars made my coffee-deprived brain about explode.

BTW... love the location. :D

Inspire
12-18-2009, 08:07 AM
That's false. At least some North Americans have upgraded to better systems...

You make me so proud. *pats head*

Emili
12-18-2009, 08:20 AM
Yeah, it's all cubits this and barleycorn that. Not to mention how we still use the gilbert and hogshead. ;)

I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.

/shrugThat actually confuses me most.

melkor1702
12-18-2009, 08:36 AM
...you do know that Canada is also part of North America, right? Or, do you think Canadians are all soldiers and scientists? :p

EDIT: Mexico also probably uses the SI, and is also part of North America, but I am not 100% sure.

It wouldn't surprise me if he doesn't know that about Canada. :rolleyes:

According to a number of online and offline sources, there are only three countries that haven't officially adopted the metric system as their primary measurement system. They are Burma, Liberia and the United States of America.

A number of other countries including the UK use a combination of metric and local measurement standards.

whysper
12-18-2009, 09:21 AM
Yeah, well science and the military. Although when I last vistited the States - this summer - I saw more metric designations on consumer products than I was used to in previous visits. I suppose it could be slowly gaining ground.

PSST: I think he is talking about that place way the hell up north. Camanad or something.

Emili
12-18-2009, 09:34 AM
Actually, it is not your language. I speak American although English is also understood. The Prince of Wales does not determine what is permissible in the American lexicon as he does the English one. Nor has he advocated the use of our native words. My mother speaks Cajun, which is by no means French, but influenced from Native Languages, Spanish, and German on the biblical French of the King Louis XIV Bible. In the same way, American is not English.


I am, as a historian, ...
Lmao,

An labhra√*onn t√ļ mB√©arla? ¬ŅHabla Ud Ingl√©s? C'√® qualcuno che parla Inglese? Parlez-vous l'Anglais? Sprechen Sie Englisch?

The Prince of Wales? :rolleyes: Be assured he cares not what language people speak nor how they ever use English. :)

Strange claim from someone claiming astuteness . :) Be it quite funny actually, I suppose the language in Boston is Bostonian while those elsewhere Baltimorese, Tidewater, Boontling, Piedmont, Texan? Although I do know there may be times when either quite understand each other. :) Yes Americans do not speak like they do in Guernsey, Cheshire, Scouse nor Ulster either. Truth be sir, Americans speak English like it or not dialect does not constitute a language barrier as you claim and any linguist shall tell you so. Yes even in example you provide be incorrect. People from Mexico, Antioquia and Colombia speak Spanish – no not Andalusian nor Ladino (dialects) which are also Spanish – yet Spanish still.

As an historian you should know this... a living language breaths and grows as the people using it. What defines a language is it's lexical, syntax and vernacular. Your so called American is the same as English in all three of these and as such is tact classified as "English" not some bloody new laguage at all. When you Americans arrive and some new sytax for sentence structure presentation of thought and define 99% of new words then you may call it "American." Oh btw... if you wish a complete listing of words - use Oxford not Websters, Websters will not have near as many so called "American" words. ;)

Ironicly I find many Americans phrase their "American" lexically speaking just as close to the Prince of Wales' "English" as I do, or anyone from Dublin, Glasgow or even Kensington or Chelsea for that matter. :)

Feicfidh m√© roimh i bhfad th√ļ!

chubbs99
12-18-2009, 09:46 AM
I was going to mention it, but all the talk about litres, miles and quasars made my coffee-deprived brain about explode.

BTW... love the location. :D

Lol, if all the "off topic" posts about Imperial vs Metric were deleted... we might just still be on page 1 haha
and Thanks :D


It wouldn't surprise me if he doesn't know that about Canada. :rolleyes:

According to a number of online and offline sources, there are only three countries that haven't officially adopted the metric system as their primary measurement system. They are Burma, Liberia and the United States of America.

A number of other countries including the UK use a combination of metric and local measurement standards.

I actually find that kinda interesting, even though up here in the frigid north (Canada) we are Metric, a Mix of Metric and Imperial is what you dominatly see. if I'm not mistaken in Canada even the building codes are 100% Imperial with no trace of Metric (mentioned on Canada's worst handyman I think?)... The funny thing is, I don't recall ever learning anything about the imperial system in school, Yet we all use more of it then we realise.

Borror0
12-18-2009, 09:49 AM
My mother speaks Cajun, which is by no means French, but influenced from Native Languages, Spanish, and German on the biblical French of the King Louis XIV Bible. In the same way, American is not English.
Right, and us Québecois speak Joual instead of French. :rolleyes:

Josh
12-18-2009, 09:51 AM
The U.S. officially should be using the SI system for measures. So, yes, someone needs to do some learnin' ;)

If you work with water or steam and energy, it's much, much easier to work with English units than SI units. Every engineer can tell you what temperature 100 psi steam is, but not what 100 kPa steam is. Same with BTU v.s. joule.

Volume is a PITA though.

Razcar
12-18-2009, 10:26 AM
...you do know that Canada is also part of North America, right? Or, do you think Canadians are all soldiers and scientists? :p

EDIT: Mexico also probably uses the SI, and is also part of North America, but I am not 100% sure.
Most of what I hear about Canada gets filtered through US media, so you don't want to know what I "know" about Canada! :p

But yeah, sorry - my mistake, should had been more careful about the nomenclature. Must be annoying for both Canadians and Mexicans when the name "North America" is misused like I just did.

Demoyn
12-18-2009, 10:58 AM
The U.S. officially should be using the SI system for measures. So, yes, someone needs to do some learnin' ;)

Using the Sports Illustrated system for measures is pretty limited. They only have B, C, D, and DD. I mean, I suppose you could use them like sundails, but...

Borror0
12-18-2009, 11:04 AM
Must be annoying for both Canadians and Mexicans when the name "North America" is misused like I just did.
That does not happen too often, thankfully.

A pet peeve of mine, though, is the word "American" and how it is used to refer to citizen of the USA uniquely.

eonfreon
12-18-2009, 11:19 AM
That does not happen too often, thankfully.

A pet peeve of mine, though, is the word "American" and how it is used to refer to citizen of the USA uniquely.

Well, what are we supposed to call them? United Statesmen? ;)

Borror0
12-18-2009, 11:24 AM
Well, what are we supposed to call them? United Statesmen? ;)
There is a movement, in the francophony, that that call them United-Statians (well, √Čtats-Uniens).

It sounds horrible, but they just had to pick a name less vain. :p

Razcar
12-18-2009, 11:27 AM
Well, what are we supposed to call them? United Statesmen? ;)Yanks! But I guess that could be seen as a bit of a slur.

Shadowsmoke
12-18-2009, 11:27 AM
Yeah, it's all cubits this and barleycorn that. Not to mention how we still use the gilbert and hogshead. ;)

I have to admit i hate the fact that we do Month/day/year, makes more sense to do day/month/year, but whatever.

/shrug

The Military use the day/month/year ie 18 Dec 2009

flynnjsw
12-18-2009, 11:28 AM
That does not happen too often, thankfully.

A pet peeve of mine, though, is the word "American" and how it is used to refer to citizen of the USA uniquely.

I don't really get that...

It's American because it's the United States of America

Canadian...Canada

That would be like someone from Brazil getting upset over the same thing because Brazil Happens to be in South America.

eonfreon
12-18-2009, 11:49 AM
Yanks! But I guess that could be seen as a bit of a slur.

Call a Southerner a Yank. That won't fly well ;).

eonfreon
12-18-2009, 11:53 AM
There is a movement, in the francophony, that that call them United-Statians (well, √Čtats-Uniens).

It sounds horrible, but they just had to pick a name less vain. :p

LOL.
But remembering my History, I'm pretty sure it wasn't vanity so much as an attempt by Ben Franklin (maybe?) to create a National identity. One of the things that divided United States Citizens was the fact that long ago you weren't an American, you were a New Yorker, a Bostonian, a Philadelphian, etc.
Took awhile before they considered themselves Americans.

Emili
12-18-2009, 12:04 PM
Right, and us Québecois speak Joual instead of French. :rolleyes:
Oooo, Je suis très heureux de vous rencontrer. Il y a quelque chose d'un accent Québécois que je trouve ainsi sexuellement l'attraction. ;)

Emili
12-18-2009, 12:19 PM
The Military use the day/month/year ie 18 Dec 2009
I'm sure they would... little endian forms or big endian forms leave little confusion on specifics nor significance on the information within. Where I come from day-month-year is common form... commonly in the United States and sometimes in Canada do they place the day in the middle.

Borror0
12-18-2009, 12:42 PM
It's American because it's the United States of America

Canadian...Canada
The naming convention we use for other countries would suggest that the proper name would be United States of American. Obviously, no one uses that word because it sounds horrible and it's really long whereas American is shorter and sounds better. The problem with that is that American can also be used to refer to people that live on the continent known as America.

That would be like someone from Brazil getting upset over the same thing because Brazil Happens to be in South America.
No. A better comparison would be UK renaming itself United-States of Europe and requesting everyone to call them Europeans.

It would cause unnecessary misunderstandings.

But remembering my History, I'm pretty sure it wasn't vanity so much as an attempt by Ben Franklin (maybe?) to create a National identity.
Oh, I'm sure they had a perfectly valid political reason at the time but, nowadays, it's more of a bother than anything.

TreknaQudane
12-18-2009, 12:53 PM
There is a movement, in the francophony, that that call them United-Statians (well, √Čtats-Uniens).

It sounds horrible, but they just had to pick a name less vain. :p

Here I am stupidly saying 'US Citizens'.

Battleworm
12-18-2009, 12:53 PM
Could you use a 24 hour clock when providing updates or guidance on down-times?

Personally I would vote for a dev to call me everytime there is an update,patch or module release.And no reverse charge calls either :eek:

Shassa
12-18-2009, 01:02 PM
The naming convention we use for other countries would suggest that the proper name would be United States of American. Obviously, no one uses that word because it sounds horrible and it's really long whereas American is shorter and sounds better. The problem with that is that American can also be used to refer to people that live on the continent known as America.

Really? I don't think anyone outside of the U.S. on this continent would want to be commonly referred to as "American" any more than others like being called Europeans, Asians or Africans. I'm not a politically-correct kind of person, but I think it's more respectful (and less ignorant) to refer to them by country. English and French culture is very different, as is American and Mexican, Chinese and Japanese, Egyptian and Somalian, whatever.

Letrii
12-18-2009, 01:02 PM
The Military use the day/month/year ie 18 Dec 2009

Except we drop the first 2 numerals of year. IN military nomenclature it is 18Dec09.

centurionaramis
12-18-2009, 01:07 PM
No. A better comparison would be UK renaming itself United-States of Europe and requesting everyone to call them Europeans.

Actually, we should already be calling them the United-Kingdomites.

Borror0
12-18-2009, 01:12 PM
Really? I don't think anyone outside of the U.S. on this continent would want to be commonly referred to as "American" any more than others like being called Europeans, Asians or Africans. I'm not a politically-correct kind of person, but I think it's more respectful (and less ignorant) to refer to them by country. English and French culture is very different, as is American and Mexican, Chinese and Japanese, Egyptian and Somalian, whatever.
It's an useful term when you need to refer to a group of nationalities.

For example, 'North American' is an handy term when you want to talk about Mexicans, US citizens and Canadians all at once. It's especially handy when you would want to talk about Europeans or Africans, where it saves you from making very long enumerations.

Emili
12-18-2009, 01:26 PM
The naming convention we use for other countries would suggest that the proper name would be United States of American. Obviously, no one uses that word because it sounds horrible and it's really long whereas American is shorter and sounds better. The problem with that is that American can also be used to refer to people that live on the continent known as America.

No. A better comparison would be UK renaming itself United-States of Europe and requesting everyone to call them Europeans.

It would cause unnecessary misunderstandings.

Oh, I'm sure they had a perfectly valid political reason at the time but, nowadays, it's more of a bother than anything.
Hmmm, Mór-Roinn na hMeiriceá Thuaidh. Pobal na Eagras na Stát Meiriceánach atá air Meiriceánach. Pobal na Ceanada atá air Ceanadach. Pobal na Ceanada agus Eagras na Stát Meiriceánach má in éineacht atá air Meiriceánach Thuaidh.

(The continent of North America, People from the Organization of States of America are called Americans. People from Canada are called Canadians. People from Canada and Organization of States of America when together are called North Americans.) :p

Well to me. ;) Ach ina dhiaidh sin is √Čireannach m√©.

When all be told though... you are what you are.

Razcar
12-18-2009, 04:54 PM
Hmmm, Mór-Roinn na hMeiriceá Thuaidh. Pobal na Eagras na Stát Meiriceánach atá air Meiriceánach. Pobal na Ceanada atá air Ceanadach. Pobal na Ceanada agus Eagras na Stát Meiriceánach má in éineacht atá air Meiriceánach Thuaidh.

Last edited by Emili; 12-18-2009 at 08:45 PM.

Yeah, about time you corrected that missing accent there! It was driving me crazy! ;)

ducimus
12-18-2009, 05:50 PM
Could I get a show of hands?

Yes for 24 hr clock;
No for am/pm.

Give it a name,

Ducimus

Emili
12-18-2009, 06:26 PM
Yeah, about time you corrected that missing accent there! It was driving me crazy! ;)
:) Yes, I actually was unsure about telling my last sentence... You're lucky am √Čireannach and not Ukranian. ;)

Emili
12-18-2009, 06:31 PM
Could I get a show of hands?

Yes for 24 hr clock;
No for am/pm.

Give it a name,

Ducimusas long as they base gmt. :)

Crazyking
12-21-2009, 01:58 AM
In my school in civilized US they teach both US units and metric units (and BOTH are required test material). My 5th grade teacher called the US units the "dummy syestem" (no joke) :P.

Wudwaen
12-26-2009, 12:09 PM
[COLOR="Plum"]The Prince of Wales? :rolleyes: Be assured he cares not what language people speak nor how they ever use English. :)
Well, then perhaps when the Prince of Wales was reported in the news as irritated at the creeping Americanisms which do not belong in the English lexicon, and that as he was comptroller responsible for accepting what is and is not *proper English*, the news was completely off target and out of line.


Be it quite funny actually, I suppose the language in Boston is Bostonian while those elsewhere ...Those in Boston are not held to speak American by most Americans, just ask a New Yorker. :D There are various dialects of American just as there are various dialects of the German. But comprehension between those living in seperate nations which follow the same or similar lexicon, syntax, and vernacular is an arbitrary designation. Take a person each from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Germany and place them at a table for a discussion. They will be able to understand each other just as effectively as taking someone each from Kansas, Southern Cal., the Texas Border, and New Jersey. My brother is from Tepique, his wife from Chihuahua, and they comprehend each other but do not use the same words for all of the same things. While a veneer of Spanish has been placed in effect, their base languages remain the Native American words they grew up with. To use a religious comparison, when there is a statue of Itzamna and Tlaloc on each side of the Virgin Mary it is no longer Roman Catholic.

And as for a difference in grammatical construction, the Split Infinitive, however disapproved of in proper English is natural to American because of the massive amount of Gaelic Influence upon our language. (Just as if one were to accept the contribution of the Irish in war songs to American Folk music, one would have to assume the Irish alone fought all US wars.)


Your so called American is the same as English in all three of these and as such is tact classified as "English" not some bloody new laguage at all.Really, and just what would an American mean if they said they were going out for a *****? Oh, sorry we speak the same language right? However, I have never requested a spanner for working under the bonnet. And when was the last time an English boy called his girl his *squaw*? The fact is we are Tselaqi (Spanish misspelling: Cherokee) or *The people who speak another language* (which is a Choctaw term).


Ironicly I find many Americans phrase their "American" lexically speaking just as close to the Prince of Wales' "English" as I do, or anyone from Dublin, Glasgow or even Kensington or Chelsea for that matter. :)We are of course, in the same language family, just as the mainland Scandinavian languages are mutually intelligible.

Agus conas at√° t√ļ?

Wudwaen
12-26-2009, 12:17 PM
Could I get a show of hands?

Yes for 24 hr clock;
No for am/pm.

Give it a name,

Ducimus

YES for 24 hour clock.

Harncw
12-27-2009, 09:39 AM
How often do they schedule anything for 12:00 be it AM or PM anyway?

Favis
12-27-2009, 12:47 PM
I'm actually kinda supprised nobody has mentioned that Turbine always makes their time relative to GMT


Realy like it that they show the time relative to GMT. :)
As long that they do that I'm "happy" ;)

Favis
12-27-2009, 12:51 PM
We are of course, in the same language family, just as the mainland Scandinavian languages are mutually intelligible.

I don't think that is the same.
If you know british english it's easy to understand american. But you know swedish it's not easy to understand danish.

IgorUnchained
12-27-2009, 01:06 PM
Nothing makes me chuckle more than when a nation of 70 million tells a nation of 300 million that they arent speaking the language, telling time, or measuring things the right way.

If 300 million people say that a boot is worn on the foot and 70 million people say it is a storage receptacle on a car, do you really think the 70 million should make the call?

Ever met someone who insists that a swastika is just an ancient sun symbol taken over by the Nazis? Well, send them through Ghost Town in Venice CA with a swastika shirt and see if the majority agrees with his semantics. Language evolves and the English Empire is long dead.....time to get with the times.

Favis
12-27-2009, 01:21 PM
Nothing makes me chuckle more than when a nation of 70 million tells a nation of 300 million that they arent speaking the language, telling time, or measuring things the right way.

I though most american was viewing there language as american english.
At least that the impression I got from software from the US.

Razcar
12-27-2009, 05:15 PM
Nothing makes me chuckle more than when a nation of 70 million tells a nation of 300 million that they arent speaking the language, telling time, or measuring things the right way.

If 300 million people say that a boot is worn on the foot and 70 million people say it is a storage receptacle on a car, do you really think the 70 million should make the call?

Ever met someone who insists that a swastika is just an ancient sun symbol taken over by the Nazis? Well, send them through Ghost Town in Venice CA with a swastika shirt and see if the majority agrees with his semantics. Language evolves and the English Empire is long dead.....time to get with the times.
Well, a world consisting of about 6 400 million people in metric-using nations is chuckling right back at you. ;) The population of the US that you mention is only approximately 2.2 tiny percent of the world's... a world where the metric system is very much dominant. Fortunately for themselves, US citizens are blessed to live in a country which can choose to use whatever system it wants to, regardless how "smart" or "dumb" it would happen to be.