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netarc
09-12-2009, 05:54 PM
Been in a few parties recently where I was pretty impressed with how aware the cleric was of the rest of the party members' healths, and was quite snappy at hitting us with cures at the appropriate times.

I've gotta think he wasn't using the mouse to do it, as the heals came fast and varied. I'd like to try a cleric build, but would like to be that effective.

So, any tips on how to heal party members quickly & effectively? e.g., is the main source of info the red health party bar? How can one target party members quickly without use of the mouse? And is sending the heal spell merely a matter of using the quickbar with appropriate # shortcut key? Are there range limitations to the cure light/moderate spells?

Thanks!

malaky
09-12-2009, 05:59 PM
Put heal spells on the shortcut bar that is set to the numbers (i.e. you want to be able to heal by pressing 1, 2, 3 on your keyboard). And for non-raid groups, it's easier to heal by hitting f1-f6 and then 1, 2, or 3. In raids, use the mouse to click their health bar and use the 1,2, etc to heal. (By the time you're raiding you probably want scrolls for healing, put those on the same bar as your spells).

LewsTherin
09-12-2009, 06:00 PM
I personally use the "F" keys to target party members. F1 is yourself, F2 is the second party member on your list and so on. It's good to have all of your different "cure" spells o your hotbars, this way while one spell is cooling down you can cast another "cure" spell for fast healing. Most people click their hotbars with their mouse. Others have gamepads or create more hotkeys to help with speed of casting. Put as many hotbars on your screen as you need.

Junts
09-12-2009, 06:01 PM
Been in a few parties recently where I was pretty impressed with how aware the cleric was of the rest of the party members' healths, and was quite snappy at hitting us with cures at the appropriate times.

I've gotta think he wasn't using the mouse to do it, as the heals came fast and varied. I'd like to try a cleric build, but would like to be that effective.

So, any tips on how to heal party members quickly & effectively? e.g., is the main source of info the red health party bar? How can one target party members quickly without use of the mouse? And is sending the heal spell merely a matter of using the quickbar with appropriate # shortcut key? Are there range limitations to the cure light/moderate spells?

Thanks!

party members are selectable as f1-12(you are always f1, and then in order down the party list, f7-12 only applicable to raid groups) and hotkeying your healing spells/wands (at low level, wands are much better as they will let you heal way more than your bar permits) will let you heal with a quick tap of f2, 3, f3, 4, f1, 3, etc, you just healed 3 different people in roughly 5-6 seconds, cooldowns permitting.

netarc
09-12-2009, 06:05 PM
great tips, thanks! btw, one of the posters mentioned "raids" ... been wondering about that, what's the diff between a raid and a quest?

malaky
09-12-2009, 06:19 PM
Raids have up to 12 players instead of 6, and typically have a much higher "need" for healing. Until you get good (and/or very wealthy) you will want at least one other person to help with healing.

Junts
09-12-2009, 06:21 PM
great tips, thanks! btw, one of the posters mentioned "raids" ... been wondering about that, what's the diff between a raid and a quest?

A raid has the following characteristics (exceptions noted):

1:parties of up to 12 people instead of 6

2:a 66 hour lockout after completion before the quest may be repeated (exception: tempest's spine)

3: accumulates completion numbers per character (see with /quest completions command, exception; ts )

4: awards some sort of enhanced or specialized end reward list upon its 20th completion, usually raid loot from the raid, see next (again exception; tempest's spine)

5: features an end chest that can possibly drop powerful, bind-to-character raid loot items not otherwise accessed anywhere but that raid (most 20th completion lists consist of a selection of the bound raid items from the raid and tomes, the shroud consists only of tomes and a special, raid-related item, ts does not accumulate 20th rewards or have raid loot)

6: features some sort of significant and usually epic boss fight against a purple-named boss (sometimes more than one), usually designed to be very, very challenging for characters in the level-range of the quest

7: usually, the raid must be keyed for by the completion of certain pre-requistes; some pre-requisites are far more complicated than simple quest chains, and others (the vault of night chain) must be repeated every time the raid is to be run

8: in raids, many ddo store conveniences like siberys spirit cakes, instant shrines, etc, cannot be used. Also, party size scaling does not affect a raid: an elite raid is the same for 1 player or 12, and its designed for 12 .. usually 12 players who are very, very well equipped for the raid's stated level, as they were designed to challenge characters who were at the level cap when the raid was released. Sometimes raid bosses are modified to continue to be challenging to the existing cap, most recently the Demon Queen and Velah the Red Dragon were updated to be challenging on elite for level 16 characters; running these raids on elite with level 10-12 characters may be -very- hard!

9: raids tend to be less forgiving of failure and uniformly do not permit re-entry or full wipe recovery without repeating the entire raid; in some fashion or other, after a certain point, people who leave a raid will not be able to enter it and reach the end if the party has progressed past a point: a door will be locked, a bridge will be gone, et cetera. Quest completion credit may be attained, but someone who arrives after the door is shut/etc will not be able to reach the end chests, so as to prevent people who do not deserve to complete the raid from recieving free loot.

10: raid endfights tend to be very complicated and sometimes involve mechanics not present anywhere else in the game; solving them the first time sometimes required repeated (in the case of a few raids, several weeks) failure on behalf of the first completers to solve the puzzles or tricks required to defeat the boss. Many of these fights require very effective coordination between group-members and a level of teamwork and role-following that is not required in other quests.

11: because of 10, raids are by far the most challenging and, if that's your thing, fun quest experiences on ddo.

While some raids have been soloed or done by small groups, those actions are generally regarded as exceptional achievements, and some of them have never been duplicated or the raid has since been altered to not permit its duplication (for example, in June I soloed the twilight forge/the titan awakes, which has since been altered so that while the end fight might still be soloable, it is no longer reachable with a group of less than 5 or 6. 3 or 4 other people had soloed the raid before I did, but no one will really be able to in the future unless they have many friends willling to run the intro quest and recall over and over while they try to figure it out).

Oddlived's solo of A Vision of Destruction is similarly something that no one has ever seriously tried to replicate, and remains probably the single greatest soloing achievement of any character on ddo.

Raid loot is incredibly good, and every raid has at least one item that is unique in effect and extremely good, even the level 10 raid (while most of it's loot is obsoleted, one item remains entirely unique and extremely effective), and most raids have several. These items are highly sought after when they do appear in the chests, and people will frequently run the raid 20 or 40 times (getting multiple list of 20th end rewards) in order to acquire them, because they are, in fact, that good.