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Tolero
07-02-2008, 11:21 AM
Are you a new or returning player to Dungeons & Dragons Online trying to make ends meet? Are you an existing player who's having trouble pinching coppers while adventuring? The Coin Lords have commissioned a public education project to help citizens with financial hardship. Join us for tips, reminders, and more in this four part series, now available by clicking here (http://www.ddo.com/article/981)!

ArkoHighStar
07-02-2008, 11:38 AM
nice article for newer players

Angelus_dead
07-02-2008, 11:48 AM
The article comments on the risk of accidently destroying something you'd like to keep. It fails to mention you can often recover a destroyed item with a vendor's Buy Back tab.

The article suggests looting scrolls in preference to weapons, because scrolls stack. Due to the wide selection of possible spells, in reality you'll almost never get to stack multiple scroll pulls, and weapons are the more profitable choice.

Impaqt
07-02-2008, 11:58 AM
I do beleive a Gem with a "Value" of 5000gp's sells for less than a Item or Weapon thats 4,000 gold as well...... so the Item Value is not always an absolute indication of how much you can sel it for in regards to keeping the most saleable Items.

Angelus_dead
07-02-2008, 12:05 PM
I do beleive a Gem with a "Value" of 5000gp's sells for less than a Item or Weapon thats 4,000 gold as well......
Right, because there are brokers who pay more for weapons/armor/items in their category. But nobody treats gems that way.

Seriously, DDO should change gem mechanics so their base selling starts at the list price, and haggle modifies from there. Gems are a durable unit of exchange, not a functional item that wears out over time or which is less useful to people with different needs.

In D&D, gems are money. They're how you carry your wealth after you graduate from platinum pieces.

Hafeal
07-02-2008, 12:10 PM
"A well organized inventory isn't the only place you can save coppers." - DDO

LOL. Ok, how about a system where you can designate where your items go in your back pack? Or at least designate tabs for certain types of equipment? Have weapons at least lock to a spot so they go where you remember you put them?

Picking up items and collectables and having them go wherever there is a first open spot is really inconvenient and is a major obstacle to having a well-organized inventory. Essentially the only time you can have one is when you start a quest. Afterwards you could spend quite the time emptying out.

Having to run to different vendors to get the best price - time sink. Many don't do it and that is fine but understand, having an inventory time sink just keep players from joining groups and creating more lfms. There have been plenty of times I log on just to do 1/2 hour or more of invenotry management.

pumagirl418
07-02-2008, 12:17 PM
how about you start w/ not 'nerfing' the loot tables? Or better yet, turn it back up a little, since you've turned it so far down.

Tanka
07-02-2008, 12:20 PM
Right, because there are brokers who pay more for weapons/armor/items in their category. But nobody treats gems that way.

Seriously, DDO should change gem mechanics so their base selling starts at the list price, and haggle modifies from there. Gems are a durable unit of exchange, not a functional item that wears out over time or which is less useful to people with different needs.

In D&D, gems are money. They're how you carry your wealth after you graduate from platinum pieces.
Then they'd have to turn down the gem droprate, man!

Sarcasm aside: I agree. Gems are equal trade for plat in PnP. They should be here as well.

totmacher
07-02-2008, 12:20 PM
funny that inventory management is mentioned when the inventory ui is horrible; even single-player games have better UI (sort, reserved slots, no paging)

Impaqt
07-02-2008, 12:34 PM
how about you start w/ not 'nerfing' the loot tables? Or better yet, turn it back up a little, since you've turned it so far down.

Loot tables are fine.

Pellegro
07-02-2008, 12:41 PM
Nice guide.

Should help nubs get up to speed a little faster.

Dungnmaster001
07-02-2008, 12:48 PM
The article suggests looting scrolls in preference to weapons, because scrolls stack. Due to the wide selection of possible spells, in reality you'll almost never get to stack multiple scroll pulls, and weapons are the more profitable choice.

The article doesn't suggest always looting scrolls in preference to weapons, only when the scroll and the weapon have a similar value. i.e. a weapon worth 1,000 gold and a scroll worth 1,000 it advises going with the scroll. Not if a weapon is worth 1,000 and a scroll worth 550.

True that you don't often get multiples of the same scroll but the article did mention that the non-stacking item, and the scroll were of similar price. If both have a similar price then it is often better to go with the stackable one on the off chance you pick up another one. Also the article is geared toward newer players. I do seem to get multiples of some scrolls when I play a low level alt so perhaps it's not unreasonable to take those over something else.

A better suggestion for new players might be to remember to sell off unneeded items frequently between quests to avoid running out of space in the first place.

Tolero
07-02-2008, 12:51 PM
...A better suggestion for new players might be to remember to sell off unneeded items frequently between quests to avoid running out of space in the first place.

That's next week's lesson :D along with the differences between regular vendors and brokers, and where you find them

Impaqt
07-02-2008, 12:54 PM
That's next week's lesson :D along with the differences between regular vendors and brokers, and where you find them

The Original DDO Wiki should be a great reference for your article.

Beherit_Baphomar
07-02-2008, 12:57 PM
I didnt even look at the guide. What I done was read all the comments here.

I lol'd.

Kisaragi
07-02-2008, 01:43 PM
Are you a new or returning player to Dungeons & Dragons Online trying to make ends meet? Are you an existing player who's having trouble pinching coppers while adventuring? The Coin Lords have commissioned a public education project to help citizens with financial hardship. Join us for tips, reminders, and more in this four part series, now available by clicking here (http://www.ddo.com/article/981)!

The funny thing is for all the coin lords seem to get paid, and as little as they do, they're considered important? The loot sucks (yes I know that's a dead horse, but I'm a necromancer so :p). When I do a level 12 quest and get a crappy shield that I wouldn't have even used on a level 4 there's an issue. Why should people be risking their neck for items they should have gotten three levels ago?

We do not have common items in the game and we need them. It breaks the game otherwise. Things such as; Clothing(Poor, merchant class, fine), Homes, Horses,Rope, Soap, Torches, boxes, bags (not 100,000 gold items), accessories (non-magical appearance kind), Tents, or even paper & pens to write in game. They're just not important it seems.

Many adventurers sit and wait for a half hour or more trying to get a needed party member for a quest. There should be mercenaries you can hire to help if you only have half the party. They should be unique and interesting found in each house. IE. The city needs some population. Soldiers, Merchants, Ordinary Citizens, etc.

Respect. Our characters may have saved the city of Stormreach countless numbers of times and we're still talked to as if we just stepped off the turnip boat. If I could, the next time some npc ****es me off by being rude I'd blast them out of their shoes. There should be titles and npcs change their dialog depending on which levels of faction you've accomplished.

These right here are elements missing from ordinary D&D games, plus I'm sure people can come up with many others. They break the illusion of the game. They're glaring items missing from the roster. However you want to phrase it, this game is not about living in Stormreach. All the normal 'life' things someone might do are not as important as kill A, now Kill B. And the rewards for doing such are pathetic.

If I could I would rally an in game revolt. If I could I might hire monsters to attack the city. If I could I would use my magic to conjure something really horrible to take my revenge. We are blocked from doing such by the fabric of reality so I end up going back to quiet Distain.

The developers have competition games that are doing all of these things. In effect, better role-playing then Dungeons and Dragons. Games that have more weight socially then this one. I think that should be upsetting, and I think as gamers that should make all of you mad. Dungeons and Dragons became the Role-playing game for fantasy and socializing. The fact that socially online has always been a mere shadow to its tabletop version really does make me mad.

If you want the franchise you need to do the work. Don't do Dungeons and Dragons half heartedly.

VonBek
07-02-2008, 02:01 PM
Looks liker a good primer, to help someone starting out. Thanks.

TreknaQudane
07-02-2008, 02:06 PM
The Original DDO Wiki should be a great reference for your article.

By nature NO wiki is ever a good refrence.

Turial
07-02-2008, 02:17 PM
By nature NO wiki is ever a good refrence.

By that same logic one could say the same for anything that gets posted in a forum.

The wiki's are good references, but they are not scientifically valid or "closed" references. They come close because other people in the know can correct information but still those not in the know can post incorrect info. In general they tend to be pretty accurate for information that isnt life saving.

query
07-02-2008, 02:17 PM
(*Gasps and shocked people drop their held items to many a clatter and breaking sound*)

Good parts: Cracked up on the NPC's "advice" (Hey, don't they keep doing the same mistakes over and over anyway?)
By making the advice from "recognized" characters we can relate to what they must have gone through when they were new. Reminding the fundamentals of checking pricing and locking precious items (oh how I almost lost my blue potions post mod 7 once...) is very useful for new players.
But as stated before, gems have a decreased value due to no specialty vendors OR recognizing their full value. Same goes with any thrown item when trying to sell them in the weapon vendor areas if it's a non permanent thrown item (you can't and have to sell to a 'sell anything' vendor.)

So best to dump those first unless you find a REALLY REALLY valuable one, as the cost depreciation for a 500 GP gem would be much worse than a starter magic item at that value (assuming it just qualifies for vendor purchase of course.)


Bad parts: See listed forum replies above mine.

My personal addition--when you finally get a spell component pouch that allows spell casting or even a delay to "get the component" THEN cast, THEN we'll talk about inventory management. Casters are automatically penalized (currently) up to eight (soon to be nine) inventory slots, unless using the few spells that don't need material components OR the eschew materials feat (which costs a precious feat AND more mana points.) And that doesn't even consider the ADDITIONAL slots for rare and costly spell components (skewed towards the wizard/sorcerer spells mostly) whether you have eschew materials or not.


And speaking of holding items that do not work well--It's difficult enough not to be able to to target quivered ammunition via the hot-bar and again be limited to the order of now BOTH the ammo first outside the quiver then the ammo within. AT BEST, the quiver is just a place you hold stuff rarely used out of the way or an overlap for many many arrows (thin or wide respectively.)



I hope you found this feedback to be both productive and prioritizing as to the fixes in "minor game management."


Now where's the chapter on how newcomers learn drunken monk styles or pimp their warforged :)

Hafeal
07-02-2008, 02:45 PM
TA better suggestion for new players might be to remember to sell off unneeded items frequently between quests to avoid running out of space in the first place.


That's next week's lesson :D along with the differences between regular vendors and brokers, and where you find them

Sounds easy. In practice, not so much. In general my high class characters generally carry about 3 1/2 backpack pages worth of weapons, armor, potions, tools of the trade (thieves' tools, spell components), rings, belts, necklaces. Oh, and let's not forget the special items you need to have - your pouches of ingredients, collectables, gems and your talismans for runs like titan. I mean you gave us 20 hot bars - you need to carry the items in order to make use of them.

Additionally, run, say, TS, and you can fill up pretty quickly. And due to the desire to grab lfms when they pop, often you'll cut short your selling. Or you won't go the individual vendors you need to to get the highest price - thus not maximizing your profit as the article is attempting to advise. Oh, it is not a problem for just higher levels. At low levels I swear you pull more stuff and you have much less space in your pack and in the bank.

So then, you sit in quest trying to figure out what to destroy and what to keep and people want to run a quest. Of course, as I mentioned earlier, it doesn't help when you can't find items in your backpack because of the way it loads and stores items on the "first available space" mode.

I guess I thought the idea of the game was to spend the majority of time joining groups and questing - not trying to do inventory management and maximize by plat intake because the game set-up has made it a greater time sink than it really needs to be. I feel like I am next going to get a corporate seminar on efficiency and productivity. :rolleyes:

Kindoki
07-02-2008, 05:32 PM
I really appreciate all the intangibles of the game - such as this primer.

My question though - how do wands ever take up less space than potions? Potions stack. Wands do not. Can someone help me out?

augie
07-02-2008, 05:38 PM
When you use a wand of resist energy, a dialog box pops up and asks you which type of resistance you would like. So your single wand can cast either Fire, Cold, Elec, Acid or Sonic resists, thus saving you 4 pack slots over having a stack of resist pots for each element.

DelScorcho
07-02-2008, 08:40 PM
What do the vendors know about making money. They are the guys that pay good plat for my +1 Bastard Sword of the Magi.

StormDale
07-04-2008, 10:28 AM
This is a great segment and advice. I wish this is around when I first started.

Although I have learn to cope with the existing UI, I do wish item remembers the last place I place it at before I equip and returns to the same spot as I un-equip. This may mean that the same spot maybe reserved while the item is currently equipped programmatically, but then again, item should be in the inventory before you can equip...There goes dragging the item from the bank directly onto your person :(

Perceval
07-07-2008, 09:36 PM
Step 1 - Collect underpants
Step 3 - Profit
Hey Charlie, what is step 2...

Step 1 - Collect underpants
Step 3 - Profit

Yeah yeah, but whats step 2

How the Faq should I know, I just work here

South Park RULEZ

:p

GoldyGopher
07-08-2008, 09:35 AM
It is a nice article but it needs better formatting as the information as presented can be confusing and lead to lost revenue for players.

I would remove the Cake from the article as it was a special one time item.

SiliconScout
07-11-2008, 04:57 PM
Is there a place / thread that will tell you who pays the most for what type of item. I assumed the merchants all offered the same cash for the same item. From the sounds of this that is not true at all.

Thanks.