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incubo
09-11-2007, 10:00 AM
The day this happened 6 years ago I was already in DEP(delayed entry program) to join the US Navy. I was on my way to work that morning and didn't hear about anything as of yet to what had happened until about 30 minutes after I had arrived at work. There was nothing on the radio talking about it as I'm sure the DJ's were watching the news themselves trying to figure out what happened.

This thing that happened made me even more firm and more determined to go join the armed forces and I spend 4 years of my life defending my country in the best way I could by doing my job.

This is to commemorate and remember those who lost their lives on that tragic day!

Thank you

DME543
09-11-2007, 10:01 AM
/salute

Generals
09-11-2007, 10:06 AM
Hoo-rah brother

few things are as important as the fight to make our children's future more safe and secure

incubo
09-11-2007, 10:26 AM
Don't let me forget about all the people that lost their lives on the USS Cole, the US destroyer that was rammed by a small boat of explosives. One of the guys in the Navy that taught me about electronics was on that ship and had just transferred to Great Lakes, Illinois to teach and said he lost a couple of his good buddies on that ship.

Also we cannot forget all the other attacks against the humanity of this planet. So this salute goes to everyone out there.

Ringos
09-11-2007, 01:12 PM
I still remember that morning when my wife came in and told me that a plane just crashed into the World Trade Center. I got up to watch the live news and something felt odd. As I continued to watch the live report, the second plane came into view and the bottom fell out of my stomache. Too many people, while maybe not forgetting it happened, forgot the feeling of that day and those that followed.

Deriaz
09-11-2007, 03:12 PM
/salute

I can remember the day, though not really the emotion (I don't think I had any. . . Shock, maybe?), even though I was only in 5th grade. Walked in to see it live on TV, since my teacher had turned it on. Was kind of awkward, seeing something that huge on TV. Hadn't really known anything that big to have happened during my lifetime, at that point.

Can also remember the next two kids that came in, saw that the towers had been hit, and thought it was, exact quote, "Cooooool!" . . . :mad: . . . Thankfully, the teacher was right behind them.

So, once again. . .

/salute

-D

Muirtach
09-11-2007, 03:20 PM
5th grade? My god who else feels old now?

I was supposed to be taping a city council meeting that day. Got up, rode my bike into City Hall and went right up to my cave and waited over an hour and a half after the meeting was supposed to start before I even found out what happened. I got caught up in my book and didn't notice the time passed while I was waiting for the mics downstairs to turn on as my cue to get back to my duties.

I had an interesting day the year after though. I watched the sun set while leaning against a bluestone inside Stonhenge. And two days later a man in Dublin told me the story about how he went completely dry starting that day. His family was watching when he woke up in a stupor from the previous evening and he asked when the new James Bond film was coming out, thinking it was a trailer.

teddok
09-11-2007, 03:22 PM
5th grade? My god who else feels old now?


God I was in the military. Man that does make me feel old.

Arnya
09-11-2007, 03:27 PM
It was 2am over here, I was playing Diablo2 and all over the channel came the news.

I saw the second plane hit. Even on the other side of the world it had a profound effect on us. It affected the whole world in one foul swoop.

Terrorism is n00b warfare employed by cowards.

Ringos
09-11-2007, 03:31 PM
God I was in the military. Man that does make me feel old.

Hey, I was already OUT of the military! (though only a 4 year stint) I seriously considered enlisting again, since they are always looking for Intel Ops guys, but decided against it for various reasons. I was in Saudi quite a bit and just missed both the OPM SANG and Kobar Tower bombings there.

Krysta_Shadowvol
09-11-2007, 03:55 PM
/Salute and Semper Fi,

I was on maternity leave at home with my 3 month old daughter on this day. I was watching in disbelief as the 2nd Plane hit tower #2. It is a day I will never forget as I found out that one of my former Co-workers was on that plane.:(

With that said I would like to salute all the Men and Women of the armed forces, as well as the Police, Firefighters and EMT’s who also serve and protect us every day. Thank you for all that you do.:D

incubo
09-11-2007, 03:58 PM
I must say I went to foxnews website and started watching some of the footage that was captured back then and brought back some of the feeling I felt back in that time.

It was surreal to say the least!

Falco_Easts
09-11-2007, 06:03 PM
I got up to get ready for work and it was on TV. Just sat there in shock. Not really sure how to react. Even down here in Australia we felt for you guys and your loss.

Uamhas
09-11-2007, 06:27 PM
Some feelings experienced on that day: Shock. Inexpressible sorrow. Crushing grief. Black hate. Pride in my countrymen- all this without having personally known a single hero or survivor that was there.

PaintHorseCowboy
09-11-2007, 08:56 PM
September 11, 2001.

The Players:
CH-47D Chinook Helicopter on Transport Mission to pick up a new engine from Fort Campbell, Kentucky; Callsign: Army Four-Eight.

Kansas City ARTCC (Air Route Traffic Control Center, Callsign: Kansas City Center)

Fort Campbell TRACon (Terminal Radar Area Control, Callsign: Fort Campbell Approach)

<ICS> Internal Communications between the crew.



The Dialogue:
Army Four-Eight: Kansas City Center, Army Four-Eight. Like to terminate IFR and proceed visual, request frequency change Fort Campbell Approach.

Kansas City Center: Army 48 negative on the freq change. Remain my freq for the time being. There's been an, um, incident, further instructions to follow when able. Remain my freq, remain clear of Fort Campbell Airspace.

Army Four-Eight: WILCO Center. Stay up you, remain clear Fort Campbell. Advise when possible. Any idea as to what's going on?

Kansas City Center: An airliner just crashed into the world trade center in New York.

<ICS> My Flight Engineer (FE) in the back of the Aircraft over the Inter-Com System: Did they just say an aircraft hit the ****ing trade towers in New York?

<ICS> My Copilot (PI) Yeah Russ, I think that's what they said. Holy ****, this is not good.

<ICS> Me (Pilot in Command, PC) I hope to god this was an accident and not done on purpose cause it has all the hallmarks of an attack.

[Approx 6 minute delay during which various topics of what is going on and how it happened are discussed using appropriately colorful military terminology.]

Kansas City Center: Army Four-Eight, Kansas City Center.

Army Four-Eight: Army Four-Eight, Go center.

Kansas City Center: Army Four-Eight, Federal Aviation Administration is issuing an administrative grounding of all aircraft airborne over US at this time. Because you're carrying a military callsign, you can request exemption, however be advised that the Air Force may intercept and escort you, and has been authorized use of deadly force to prohibit incursions into no-fly areas. Recommend you land immediately at nearest suitable airfield.

Army Four-Eight: Roger center. We'll comply with the grounding. We are approx 30 miles from our intended landing point at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ETE 13 minutes to touchdown if we proceed inbound. Request to continue inbound to Fort Campbell.

Kansas City Center: Army Four-Eight, continue inbound to Fort Campbell. Contact Fort Campbell Approach. Frequency Change Approved. Good Luck guys, I think you're going to be real busy, real soon.

Army Four-Eight: So long Center, and thanks for the well-wishes. Four-Eight over to approach.

[Changes Radio Frequencies]

Army Four-Eight: Fort Campbell Approach, Army Four-Eight.

Approach: Army Four-Eight, Fort Campbell Approach.

Army Four-Eight: Fort Campbell Approach, Army Four-Eight is a CH-47D Chinook Helicopter, 30 miles north inbound landing for the transient ramp, complying with FAA Grounding. We have the current ATIS (Automated Terminal Information System) and we're requesting fuel.

Approach: Army Four-Eight, proceed inbound direct transient ramp. Current Altimeter 30.20. Report entering Fort Campbell Airspace. You'll stay up with me as I'm handling tower functions as well.

Army Four-Eight: Roger Approach, 30.20 on the kollsman, inbound direct for the transient ramp. Stay up with you.

[About 10 minutes delay while we discuss more possible scenarios in yet more appropriately colorful language and perform before landing checks.]

Army Four-Eight: Fort Campbell Approach, Army Four-Eight is 5 north inbound landing transient ramp.

Approach: Army Four-Eight, avoid overflight of any active aircraft on the field, avoid overflight of 160th SOAR ramp and buildings. Cleared to land on the bravo taxiway adjacent to the transient ramp. A follow-me vehicle will meet you and guide you to parking. Be advised, a second aircraft has now collided with the second tower. You may be here a while. I'll have base ops send a courtesy vehicle.

Army Four-Eight: A SECOND aircraft?!?! I guess that sort of rules out an accident doesn't it?

Approach: Yeah, I think it does. Confirm cleared to land.

Army Four-Eight: Roger, cleared to land on bravo taxiway, look for the follow-me. And thanks for your help with Base Ops.

<ICS> PC: **** guys, this is gonna be bad. We're not going anywhere for a while. Hope you brought your toothbrush.

<ICS> PI: I think we're right. We just got attacked. I hope we don't *****-foot around like Clinton did. I think Bush'll hit the ******** responsible back so hard when they land their turbin will be out of style.

<ICS> FE: Bet it was a terrorist attack. In fact, I'll be you a case of Shiner Bock that it's that little rat**** bin Laden.

<ICS> PC: No way I'm taking that bet Russ. But only cause I think you're balls-on right.

<ICS> PI: Got the LZ in site. Got the Follow-me. Set it down on the taxiway?

<ICS> PC: Yeah Mike. Put it down on the intersection of the taxiway and the access to the ramp.

[After Landing Checks]

Army Four-Eight: Approach, Army Four-Eight clear of bravo taxiway, has the follow-me, going to parking. Thanks for your help. What's the ETA for the fuel truck?

Approach: No problem, welcome to Fort Campbell. No ETA on fuel. I think everyone's glued to the TV right now.

Army Four-Eight: Yeah. I'd bet.

Generals
09-11-2007, 09:01 PM
I felt shock, anger, then cold resolve.

roger that on the re-up thing. I'd just left 10 yrs from the USA on 9/11 and almost did it myself. My lil girls kept me sane enough to stay stateside tho. my mission now is to see them through ok.

anyway we've survived to witness these days, hopefully to see justice served.

GREAT POST COWBOY! dam that took me back to tac tower days. 111th atc

XFracture
09-11-2007, 09:22 PM
On September 11th, 2001... I'll never forget that day.

I was stationed in Okinawa Japan enjoying some beer with a couple of my buddies that lived on the same deck as I did in our barracks. It was a tuesday night (remember time zones), and I'll never forget it.

We were watching a movie, Mystery Men I believe, getting a pretty good buzz going on too I might add. Suddenly I heard a shout from across the hall. One of my team leaders shouting for me, "Sergeant <name>! Sergeant you gotta see this!"

So I saunter over to his room, a beer in both hands and a cigarette burnin' in my mouth. I walk in and see 5 Marines watching CNN. EXACTLY at that point is when the second plane hit the towers as I watched. It really didn't register with me being kinda off my rocker, "What the **** are you guys watching?"

"Dude," one of the Marines start to pipe... he's a first year boot so I let it go, "It's an attack! They're ramming planes into the world trade center!" I don't think I've ever, even to this day, sobered up faster than I did that night. I was instantly alert. I ran over to my room, tossed the bottles and cig into the sink, grabbed a skivvy shirt and shouted for my platoon to get into the hall, I have a mighty set of lungs.

It took no more than 10 seconds for them all to get into formation (lined along the bulkheads), "Alright m*therf***ers. We're in the sh*t now, toss the beer and start packing your gear because if my guess is right we're gonna have an early morning flight to god knows where." I started barking orders to my team leaders, banged on the hatch of the company armorers to give 'em a heads up etc. etc.

By 11 a.m. the next morning we were on the tarmac heading out to Jakarta, Indonesia to protect the U.S. embassy there. Mid-flight we were informed that Bin-Laden had released a "call to the muslims of the world, to rise up against the tyrants of the west". Indonesia is home to the largest population of Muslims in the world, we were told to expect a hostile welcome.

September 11th, 2001... I'll never forget that day.

Luthen
09-11-2007, 09:35 PM
My friend and I had returned from watching a JETS game the night before. We were supposed to stay with a friend only 9 blocks from the Towers but he was out all night so we headed home. I can remember vividly driving to the city looking across the river and seeing the NY skyline. Unfortunately it was the last time I would ever see it the way it was. We headed back down that evening to help with rescue efforts. Even with all the noise of machines working and the hussle of all those working to save lives it was strangely quiet.

I know that seems a contradiction but for those who were there they might get my meaning. While I remember those who died I try and remember those who fought for life which will always serve as a reminder that no matter how horrible the deeds of some may be... the courage and heart of most will always inspire.

Rest in Peace to some. Live life and cherish it to all the rest.

Dorthin_Othortin
09-11-2007, 09:46 PM
GREAT POST!

on that morning i had been out of the Marine Corps 1yr & 5 months. i remember the morning so clearly, i was in my appartment and my mom called me and told me to turn on the tv, any station and she would call me back later. i turned on the tv and the first thing i heard was that disney world had shut down all operations for the day. i thought, weird, why would disney world shut down? then the news flashed and i saw the first of the towers on fire. to be honest, at first it didnt even dong in my head that that was the NYC WTC buildings...then i was glued to the tv for the next 5 hours watching the story unfold as the second building was struck and they both fell to the ground. i remember watching those scenes and my heart falling, i felt sick to my stomach.

i had been discharged from the corps with an honorable discharge due to medical reasons with an RE-5 reenlist code (unable to reenlist)

even though i knew i couldnt reenlist every part of my being told me that the only place i wanted to be at that moment was in my uniform, with my brothers in arms, posed to strike back!

i still feel that way even today, 6 years later. my brother is an officer in the Marine Corps serving in Iraq as i write this, as well as a family friend's son who was just awarded the combat infantry badge and is being considered for a bronze star. i thank the lord for those 2 men that are over there providing the very blanket of freedom that my wife, baby girl and myself will sleep under tonight.

thank you to all service members who have served, are currently serving and those of you amoung us that have not yet heeded the calling of our country's need for your service.

God Bless America!
God Bless our Troops!

-United States Marine Corps Veteran, '96-'00, Cpl. E-4

Griftor
09-11-2007, 11:00 PM
Truthfully, I was asleep when the attacks happened. I was stationed over at RAF Lakenheath, England, and had been working mids shift. I got a call late in the afternoon telling me that we weren't going to work that night. No reason, just don't show up. First thing I did was grab the remote and turn on CNN. Complete shock just washed over me as I was watching the replays.

Being the only F-15 units in Europe, we were all biting at the bit to be the ones called up and start blowing the **** out of things in retaliation.

hennebux
09-12-2007, 04:43 AM
In my heart I have nothing but sorrow and compassion for those who lost their lives on that fateful day.I also want to say I appreciate those who dedicate their lives to ensure our freedom.I would be remiss however if I didn't mention that I feel two wrongs don't make a right, and that I only can hope that the all swords will be beaten into plowshares.That diplomacy and understanding might finally flourish in the troubled middle east, and world wide. I'll leave you with a quote...

Violence as a way of achieving justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends by defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Uamhas
09-12-2007, 07:31 AM
In my heart I have nothing but sorrow and compassion for those who lost their lives on that fateful day.I also want to say I appreciate those who dedicate their lives to ensure our freedom.I would be remiss however if I didn't mention that I feel two wrongs don't make a right, and that I only can hope that the all swords will be beaten into plowshares.That diplomacy and understanding might finally flourish in the troubled middle east, and world wide. I'll leave you with a quote...

Violence as a way of achieving justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends by defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Laudable sentiments- it's likely that makes you a better person than I. Personally, I feel that violence of action in responding to terrorist action is a very effective way to discourage a repeat.

Ringos
09-12-2007, 09:30 AM
In my heart I have nothing but sorrow and compassion for those who lost their lives on that fateful day.I also want to say I appreciate those who dedicate their lives to ensure our freedom.I would be remiss however if I didn't mention that I feel two wrongs don't make a right, and that I only can hope that the all swords will be beaten into plowshares.That diplomacy and understanding might finally flourish in the troubled middle east, and world wide. I'll leave you with a quote...

Violence as a way of achieving justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends by defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I'm not sure what the context of Dr. King's quote is, but I would imagine that it refering to civil rights. There is a big difference between fighting to achieve justice (equality) and fighting terrorism (people that fly aircraft into civilian-occupied buildings). You cannot 'win the understanding' of a terrorist. Just my opinion...

teddok
09-12-2007, 09:53 AM
In my heart I have nothing but sorrow and compassion for those who lost their lives on that fateful day.I also want to say I appreciate those who dedicate their lives to ensure our freedom.I would be remiss however if I didn't mention that I feel two wrongs don't make a right, and that I only can hope that the all swords will be beaten into plowshares.That diplomacy and understanding might finally flourish in the troubled middle east, and world wide. I'll leave you with a quote...

Violence as a way of achieving justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends by defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Some people say that Violance never solves anything. I have to disagree with that stetament. Violance has solved more issues in history then anyother factor. I am not saying that it is right. I will say that there is a time and a place for it. I will also say that human nature will alway prevent peace. Peace is somthing that the human race as a whole will never be able to acheive. It is sad but very true. You may not like it but hopfully you will relize what i say is true. You can even look back at the historical records and find that there has never been a true peace in the world.
Ladies and Gentlemen thank you.

Vordax
09-12-2007, 10:01 AM
In my heart I have nothing but sorrow and compassion for those who lost their lives on that fateful day.I also want to say I appreciate those who dedicate their lives to ensure our freedom.I would be remiss however if I didn't mention that I feel two wrongs don't make a right, and that I only can hope that the all swords will be beaten into plowshares.That diplomacy and understanding might finally flourish in the troubled middle east, and world wide. I'll leave you with a quote...


Those who beat their swords into plowshares will end up plowing for those who didn't - Anonymous

Vordax

moorewr
09-12-2007, 10:02 AM
Laudable sentiments- it's likely that makes you a better person than I. Personally, I feel that violence of action in responding to terrorist action is a very effective way to discourage a repeat.

The problem with applied violence is all about who, what, when, and how.

I'd go on and apply that to current events, but we all know all we need to know (ad nauseum) about Socialist Ba'ath and Shia Iranians vis a vis Sunni religious extremists.

Lizzybrat
09-12-2007, 10:07 AM
As most of you know I just gave birth and I am active on a message board for mother's due in September. One of the biggest discussions was about having a baby on 9/11 and the feelings behind it. A vast majority of the women felt that it would make it extra special to have their child on 9/11 to represent birth instead of death and to bring something positive to a date that will always be associated to a date so filled with tragedy. So six years later we are bringing new life in to the world and paying tribute to those who lost theirs, and to me that is a beautiful thing.

Six years ago I was in the hospital having a nonstress test in order to make sure I was not in early labor. I was flipping through the channels on the room's tv and hooked up to 8 bazillion monitors when I stopped on CNN. I had to call my husband to see if it was actually real. I will never forget that day - it reminded me of all the blessings I have and how lucky I really am.

I am a firm supporter of all branches of the US Military and would never be able to thank them enough for all they do. This also goes for all of our fire fighters, police officers, red cross workers and the like. So many people willing to risk everything they have to help someone else. If there is nothing else I could do I can promise I will never take that for granted.

satya_sai
09-12-2007, 11:50 AM
I remember clearly coming to work and hearing ruckuss in the halls after the first plane hit... My boss wheeled a tv in from the lab to my office so that we could see what was happening. I watched in horror, thinking that it would happen over and over and over again across the country at the same time and fearing for the whereabouts of my father who was a long-time member of the Boys from Syracuse 174th fighter wing.

I'm deeply saddened by the suffering of so many innocent people. I'm saddened by the suffering or death of anyone as a result of political agenda, including Americans or Iraqis, civilians or soldiers. And, I'm more saddened that since then, and perhaps as a result, we have garnered an animosity for us that has never been rivaled in history.

I beg you all to take any measures you can to help us release our dependency upon oil, educate yourselves and particpate fully in the political process, support those who act to protect that which they believe in, and practice tolerance and acceptance for the rest of the souls in the world.

Ringos
09-12-2007, 01:28 PM
I remember clearly coming to work and hearing ruckuss in the halls after the first plane hit... My boss wheeled a tv in from the lab to my office so that we could see what was happening. I watched in horror, thinking that it would happen over and over and over again across the country at the same time and fearing for the whereabouts of my father who was a long-time member of the Boys from Syracuse 174th fighter wing.

I'm deeply saddened by the suffering of so many innocent people. I'm saddened by the suffering or death of anyone as a result of political agenda, including Americans or Iraqis, civilians or soldiers. And, I'm more saddened that since then, and perhaps as a result, we have garnered an animosity for us that has never been rivaled in history.

I beg you all to take any measures you can to help us release our dependency upon oil, educate yourselves and particpate fully in the political process, support those who act to protect that which they believe in, and practice tolerance and acceptance for the rest of the souls in the world.

"...we have garnered an animosity for us that has never been rivaled in history. "

Fact is, you can't please everyone. You can only decide what you think is right and act on that. Animosity will always be there, no matter how hard we try to placate the world. If we are hated for doing good, I feel sorry for those who hate us.

"...and practice tolerance and acceptance for the rest of the souls in the world."


I have no room for tolerance and acceptance in my heart for terrorists or the people who were in power before the Iraqi invasion. Terrorists fly aircraft into buildings and kill the innocent. The old Iraqi government gassed, bombed and shot thousands of Kurdish people over the years...just because they could get away with it. People like that don't deserve tolerance and acceptance.

Generals
09-12-2007, 01:44 PM
..and it goes without saying that our enemies want to wipe us out. not talk.

so if we must fight - 'take the fight to the enemy, or he will bring it to you'.

there is no bigger danger that we face. I only wish we were more united. Our division is their success.

Razore
09-12-2007, 04:42 PM
I was building a set at a local theater for an upcoming musical performance. I went inside the office on campus to see where my coworkers were and saw the horor on the television. Stuned , i couldnt turn away . I had no idea really what had hapened . It was probably the most defineing day of my life to date.

kensihin_Himura
09-13-2007, 01:32 AM
I can't believe that it's been 6 years since that day, feeling old right now. Was in the biology classroom messing around with some lab at the time and the princpial came on the speakers and announced that the twin towers had just been hit by something and that they were damaged. Nobody at the time was freakin out because most of them knew about the earlier bombing that happened in the 1990's. The principal told us to just stay calm and any other information would be announced soon. Went to the next class and the my teacher had the t.v. on and was watching the news. Decided to check the news sites and see what was going on. Was stunned to see what had happened and kept searching the site and check my e-mail. Was mailing one of my friends that lived ont he coast and looked up in time to see the second plane hit. The whole class started to freak out and get worried and the principal said over the speaker that another plane had hit. Near the end of class was still watching the news and saw the towers collapse. Everyone was getting scared. For the rest of the day the cops were at the school and all the after-school programs were cancelled. Everyone had to leave school after it was dissmissed.

Do to the way that the world is more attacks like the twin towers, pearl harbor, the beirut barracks attacks, or even the bombings that happened over in britain bombings back in 2005 are going to keep happening. Only thing we can do is to keep vilgilant and trust our allies and our own intelligent agencies to keep us informed and the brave people in our armed services to keep us safe.

Falco_Easts
09-13-2007, 02:02 AM
Anyone who can find room for forgiveness and peace in their heart for terrorists is a better person then I am.
I am not American, but what happened on that day was not just an attack on America, it was an attack on ideals held by most of the Western World.

lostinjapan
09-13-2007, 08:25 AM
Violence as a way of achieving justice is both impractical and immoral. It is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all. The old law of an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind. It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding; it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends by defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

.....

I give you my own quote:

"Your unconditional rejection of violence makes you smugly think of yourselves as noble, as enlightened, but in reality it is nothing less than abject moral capitulation to evil. Unconditional rejection of self-defense, because you think it's a supposed surrender to violence, leaves you no resort but begging for mercy or offering appeasement."

"Evil grants no mercy, and any attempt to appease it is nothing more than a piecemeal surrender to it. Surrender to evil is slavery at best, death at worst. Thus your unconditional rejection of violence is really nothing more than embracing death as preferable to life."

"The right, the absolute necessity, of vengeance against anyone who initiates force against you is fundamental to survival. The morality of a people's self defense is in its defense of each individual's right to life. It's an intolerance of violence, made real by an unwavering willingness to crush any who would launch violence against you. The unconditional determination to destroy any who would initiate force against you is an exaltation of the value of life. Refusing to surrender your life to any thug or tyrant who lays claim to it is in fact embracing life itself."

"Compromising with [evil], which is precisely what you are suggesting, grants [evil] moral equivalence where none can rightfully exist. Moral equivalence says that you are no better than they; therefore, their belief--that they should be able to torture, rape, or murder you--is just as morally valid as your view--that you have the right to live free of their violence. Moral compromise rejects the concept of right and wrong. It says that everyone is equal, all desires are equally valid, all action is equally valid, so everyone should compromise to get along."

"To even suggest compromise can exist is to sanction murder."

Terry Goodkind

I /salute the people of the United States Armed Services.

I was at my brother's home in Texas when my teenage niece called me to come get her from school early. I asked her why - she said a plane crashed into the World Trade Center - I thought yeah...uh-huh...sure.

So I turned on the TV...and dropped the phone.

I went and picked her up and by the time we got back I was frantic, trying to reach my husband in D.C. and all the lines were busy. I remember thinking, "please just don't let him have gone to the Pentagon today".

The overwhelming relief I felt when I knew he was still safe at the Army base in Fort Belvoir, VA was incalculable.

Shock, horror, grief...these can only somewhat describe the depth of damaging emotions that were felt on that terrible day. May we never have another like it.

gorloch
09-13-2007, 04:42 PM
I was getting ready to start my work day. My supervisor normally wouldn't allow the radio to be up loud but that day was different. There wasn't a TV to watch. So all during the work day was spent listening to what was going on the radio. I didn't watch any of it till I got home later that day. I do remember the phone call from my dad (who traveled all over the US and the world) saying he was in Virginia that day, as well as the call from my mom saying my uncles meeting (which was scheduled to be held across the street from the towers) had been postponed the day before. Again for all those who have given their lives (voluntary or not) and to those fighting to keep the freedom we hold so dear, there are no words that can discribe the gratitude in which I feel.

PIXA

hennebux
09-13-2007, 08:48 PM
"Your unconditional rejection of violence makes you smugly think of yourselves as noble, as enlightened, but in reality it is nothing less than abject moral capitulation to evil. Unconditional rejection of self-defense, because you think it's a supposed surrender to violence, leaves you no resort but begging for mercy or offering appeasement."

"Evil grants no mercy, and any attempt to appease it is nothing more than a piecemeal surrender to it. Surrender to evil is slavery at best, death at worst. Thus your unconditional rejection of violence is really nothing more than embracing death as preferable to life."

"The right, the absolute necessity, of vengeance against anyone who initiates force against you is fundamental to survival. The morality of a people's self defense is in its defense of each individual's right to life. It's an intolerance of violence, made real by an unwavering willingness to crush any who would launch violence against you. The unconditional determination to destroy any who would initiate force against you is an exaltation of the value of life. Refusing to surrender your life to any thug or tyrant who lays claim to it is in fact embracing life itself."

"Compromising with [evil], which is precisely what you are suggesting, grants [evil] moral equivalence where none can rightfully exist. Moral equivalence says that you are no better than they; therefore, their belief--that they should be able to torture, rape, or murder you--is just as morally valid as your view--that you have the right to live free of their violence. Moral compromise rejects the concept of right and wrong. It says that everyone is equal, all desires are equally valid, all action is equally valid, so everyone should compromise to get along."

"To even suggest compromise can exist is to sanction murder."

One good quote deserves another

“Violence can only be concealed by a lie, and the lie can only be maintained by violence. Any man who has once proclaimed violence as his method is inevitably forced to take the lie as his principle.”
Alexander Solzhenitzyn

lostinjapan
09-13-2007, 08:56 PM
[/COLOR]

One good quote deserves another

“Violence can only be concealed by a lie, and the lie can only be maintained by violence. Any man who has once proclaimed violence as his method is inevitably forced to take the lie as his principle.”
Alexander Solzhenitzyn

This quote is unworthy of rebuttal, even if my original post did not speak clearly enough already.

Ringos
09-13-2007, 09:15 PM
[/COLOR]

One good quote deserves another

“Violence can only be concealed by a lie, and the lie can only be maintained by violence. Any man who has once proclaimed violence as his method is inevitably forced to take the lie as his principle.”
Alexander Solzhenitzyn

I think this quote is attributed to someone with a somewhat jaded point of view...considering his backround. I'm sure many of the oppressed Kurds in Iraq would have said the same thing, until countries using 'violence' came in and wiped out those that used violence to oppress them.

hennebux
09-14-2007, 04:11 AM
“Violence can only be concealed by a lie, and the lie can only be maintained by violence. Any man who has once proclaimed violence as his method is inevitably forced to take the lie as his principle.”
Alexander Solzhenitzyn

This quote is unworthy of rebuttal,
Unless you've woke up in a stretcher...

lostinjapan
09-14-2007, 04:35 AM
Even after pointing out that the quote was unworthy to rebut, after your last post I was going to say something. Instead I have decided not to and that it would be in poor taste for this thread to continue in this manner.

Enough of the dissing each other's views. I will not change mine and do not expect you to change yours.

The original point of this thread was to spare a moment to think about the tragedy that filled our lived 6 years ago (and still does!) and to salute those men and women who put their lives on the line for the rest of us.

I have, I do, and I will. Military spouse, military sister, military daughter, military granddaughter. Always in support of the US Armed Forces, may America always be strong.

/salute

Jaywade
09-14-2007, 07:56 PM
.....


I /salute the people of the United States Armed Services.

I was at my brother's home in Texas when my teenage niece called me to come get her from school early. I asked her why - she said a plane crashed into the World Trade Center - I thought yeah...uh-huh...sure.

So I turned on the TV...and dropped the phone.

I went and picked her up and by the time we got back I was frantic, trying to reach my husband in D.C. and all the lines were busy. I remember thinking, "please just don't let him have gone to the Pentagon today".

The overwhelming relief I felt when I knew he was still safe at the Army base in Fort Belvoir, VA was incalculable.

Shock, horror, grief...these can only somewhat describe the depth of damaging emotions that were felt on that terrible day. May we never have another like it.

/salute to you and your family.....

I my self come from a miltary background (got a heal bot named intherear w/ the gear ) my father also is at the pentagon quite often as well as my father-in-law the loss this nation felt on that day can not be measured... I wished I could of seen this in that day that it started but I wasn't logged on.

side note anyone that would use this thread to talk about objection to the fighting in Iraq is really missing the point.... and it pains me to great ends to see those that stab at this country rather than support it. I doubt Dr. King would have appiled those words to terrorist's. Maybe I'm wrong, but I doubt it

PaintHorseCowboy
09-16-2007, 08:53 AM
You know, I was going to stay out of this after posting where I was but after seeing a few folks replies to this thread, I have become incensed. Not at the viewpoint expressed but by the gall of the author to place that in THIS thread.

Here's a few quotes I've compiled. Where able, I've listed the name of the individual. A few of these are worth your thought before you come to a thread which should almost be considered sacred ground, and proceed to bash those of us who are on the front line defending your very right to utter your point of view.

QUOTES:
Among the men who fought on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue." --Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, 16 March 1945

"Equal Rights For All, Special Privileges For None." --Thomas Jefferson

Enjoying your freedom? Thank a veteran! --Anonymous

"If you can read this, thank a teacher, if you are reading it in English, thank a soldier!" --Anonymous

"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not!" --Thomas Jefferson

"A young man who does not have what it takes to perform military service is not likely to have what it takes to make a living." --John F. Kennedy

"It is in truth not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom - for that alone, which no good man gives up but with life itself." --Declaration of Arbroath, Scotland, 1320

"We sleep safely in our beds because a few rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." -George Orwell

"You can tell a lot about a fellow's character by the way he eats jelly beans." --Ronald Reagan

"Those who stand for nothing fall for anything." --Alexander Hamilton

"You are remembered for the rules you break." --Gen. Douglas MacArthur

"For Those That Have Fought, and Nearly Died For It, Freedom Has a
Special Flavor The Protected Will Never Know" --Anonymous: Khe Sanh Grunt

Being a soldier is a serious job for serious people! - Col. Dudley Cosgrove

My personal favorite:
"I have neither the time, nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. I would rather you just said, 'Thank you.' and went on your way." --Col. Jessup played by Jack Nicholson in A FEW GOOD MEN

And one last quote:
The Soldier

It is the soldier, not the reporter,
who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the soldier, not the poet,
who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer,
who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer,
who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the soldier,
who salutes the flag,
who serves under the flag,
and whose coffin is draped by the flag,
who allows the protester to burn the flag.

By Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC

hennebux
09-16-2007, 12:40 PM
Out of respect.I will respectfully bow out of the debate I (inadvertently)caused,my intention was never to cause disharmony, slight those who defend our country,or those who suffered on that fatefull day.I was only trying to express my beliefs.However strongly I feel, I recognize now that my effort was a little misguided and probably in poor taste for this forum.I would like to continue this discussion (and all the fun quoting) in a more appropriate thread
which I may just start one day.Again my apologies if I offended.

In the spirit of the op I will share quickly my story.I'm a n.y. native who now lives boston.I was in n.y.c. when the planes hit.I had been to yankee stadium the night before to catch clemens go for another 20th win.The game was rained out.I was driving out of the city near the conneticut border when the second plane hit and the story became fully realized.I remember having to decide whether to turn back or continue heading to mass. After seeing all the emergency vehicles congregating at underpasses and rushing the other way, as well as hearing the advisories on the radio I sullenly decided to press forth and not return at that time.It wasn't an easy decision, the majority of my family lives and works in n.y.c. I will especially miss the memories of me and my twin sister going back together and realizing we were back in the city of our birth, when we saw the twin towers which we thought were made especially because we were twins.Since that day the world to me has seemed a more empty and mean place.

Jaywade
09-17-2007, 08:40 AM
You know, I was going to stay out of this after posting where I was but after seeing a few folks replies to this thread, I have become incensed. Not at the viewpoint expressed but by the gall of the author to place that in THIS thread.

Here's a few quotes I've compiled. Where able, I've listed the name of the individual. A few of these are worth your thought before you come to a thread which should almost be considered sacred ground, and proceed to bash those of us who are on the front line defending your very right to utter your point of view.

QUOTES:
Among the men who fought on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue." --Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN, 16 March 1945

"Equal Rights For All, Special Privileges For None." --Thomas Jefferson

Enjoying your freedom? Thank a veteran! --Anonymous

"If you can read this, thank a teacher, if you are reading it in English, thank a soldier!" --Anonymous

"Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not!" --Thomas Jefferson

"A young man who does not have what it takes to perform military service is not likely to have what it takes to make a living." --John F. Kennedy

"It is in truth not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom - for that alone, which no good man gives up but with life itself." --Declaration of Arbroath, Scotland, 1320

"We sleep safely in our beds because a few rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." -George Orwell

"You can tell a lot about a fellow's character by the way he eats jelly beans." --Ronald Reagan

"Those who stand for nothing fall for anything." --Alexander Hamilton

"You are remembered for the rules you break." --Gen. Douglas MacArthur

"For Those That Have Fought, and Nearly Died For It, Freedom Has a
Special Flavor The Protected Will Never Know" --Anonymous: Khe Sanh Grunt

Being a soldier is a serious job for serious people! - Col. Dudley Cosgrove

My personal favorite:
"I have neither the time, nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. I would rather you just said, 'Thank you.' and went on your way." --Col. Jessup played by Jack Nicholson in A FEW GOOD MEN

And one last quote:
The Soldier

It is the soldier, not the reporter,
who has given us freedom of the press.

It is the soldier, not the poet,
who has given us freedom of speech.

It is the soldier, not the campus organizer,
who has given us the freedom to demonstrate.

It is the soldier, not the lawyer,
who has given us the right to a fair trial.

It is the soldier,
who salutes the flag,
who serves under the flag,
and whose coffin is draped by the flag,
who allows the protester to burn the flag.

By Father Dennis Edward O'Brien, USMC

ALL GOOD STUFF..... and thanks to you to sir for your service as well, being from a miltary family myself I know you men and women just don't hear that enough, please know there are many here that do support us and the jobs you do to protect our life and liberties.

incubo
09-17-2007, 10:43 AM
I'd like to thank all of you that posted in my thread. I know some are still angry over what happened and certain views are for peaceful resolution and some to throw it back down the throat of the enemy.

I spent my time overseas, although it was on a ship far away from any immediate danger, but I was there doing my part.

I am glad to have spent some time over there, but I am also glad to be able to come home.

loki523
09-19-2007, 08:05 AM
I'm not sure what the context of Dr. King's quote is, but I would imagine that it refering to civil rights. There is a big difference between fighting to achieve justice (equality) and fighting terrorism (people that fly aircraft into civilian-occupied buildings). You cannot 'win the understanding' of a terrorist. Just my opinion...

Actually, you're wrong. MLK was talking about violence in all its forms as it applies to justice in all its forms. My 9 year old daughter understood the meaning of the quote just fine without any need for context. MLK is often misunderstood, though. Beacuse of the time in which he lived and the circumstances under which he preached, he is often seen as a civil rights leader. What most people don't understand is that he was a human rights leader.

My own personal opinion is that fundamental religious extremists are not logical and not human. They cannot be reasoned with and when their obsessive fanaticism drives them to do harm to others they deserve the deaths they are given. Justice is served in destroying them and stomping out the flames of their zealous hate before they set fire to a world composed of confused and angry tinder.

I also feel that people who value peace over violence under any condition are better human beings than myself. Then again, I'm a realist.

That's why MLK was a better person than most of the people on this thread including myself and why he has a holiday and none of us ever will. ;)

Bekki
09-11-2009, 06:53 AM
Lest we forget...

Let us take a moment today...
At 8:46 Am EST.

To remember


/Bows head....

Ganak
09-11-2009, 07:02 AM
My company was headquartered in the WTC, and we lost over 300 people. Many of my colleagues are survivors. About to head to work and my emotions are strong. This is always a tough day. We have a memorial service and I take time to read the personal profiles of the many people who died that day. You read story after story and the impact is surreal.

Bekki
09-11-2009, 07:10 AM
My company was headquartered in the WTC, and we lost over 300 people. Many of my colleagues are survivors. About to head to work and my emotions are strong. This is always a tough day. We have a memorial service and I take time to read the personal profiles of the many people who died that day. You read story after story and the impact is surreal.


My Condolances, Ganak.

Caine52184
09-11-2009, 08:13 AM
/Salute and Semper Fi,


With that said I would like to salute all the Men and Women of the armed forces, as well as the Police, Firefighters and EMT’s who also serve and protect us every day. Thank you for all that you do.:D

\signed

deadmanet
09-11-2009, 08:56 AM
I didn't even know what had happened till about 30 mins after the second plane hit. I was in a job training seminar(supposed to be all day) when the instructor got a phone call and sent us home. I drove home, still not knowing what was going on, to find my mother watching the news, horrified. I didn't go back the following day.

I will always remember the look on my mothers face when I walked in the door that day. And I hope no one ever has to see it. To those that lost loved ones on this day, and all the years after in the war. Our prayers and thanks will always be with you. I only wish that I was physically capable of being there to personally thank each and everyone of those that serve to protect our freedoms.(Wish I could join you more)

So, I will just say thank you. And give you one big

SALUTE

MrWizard
09-11-2009, 09:16 AM
I remember getting a call that woke me up (was sleeping late that morning, EST).

just layed in bed and watched til that night. Dozed off sometime during the day and woke up as I heard 'god bless america' being sung. Looked at the TV and saw congress singing that. Was very powerful.

I had just started my real estate company and after 7 months had finally gotten enough deals to catch up on my bills. In august I got 7 houses listed and spent 100% of my cash on advertising thinking I had finally got my business off the ground.

september 12th all 7 customers called and took their homes off the market and I lost everything.

I just stayed at home all that month and watched the news and ate pizza...and listened to my American music CD that I made.

My brother had a job that has him travelling all over the world via plane and I have never had good feelings about his job since then.

And no matter how you stand on the wars that came since, there is great sadness in my heart for the 100,000+ innocent people killed in them...and for the families ripped apart, livelihoods lost or forced to become refugees.

Can you imagine what it must be like to go to sleep in your home at night not knowing if a rocket will blow it up, or terrorists may blow it up? Every night? Worried about your kids going to school?

It is a changed world from the one we grew up in...

archora
09-11-2009, 11:20 AM
I live in Scotland so was in no way directly affected by what happened but still I'll never forget that day. I spent at least 10 hours that day watching the news in a stunned state. I remember the disbelief, the horror, genuine grief and fury like ive never known. Though I will also say that while watching the worst of mankind I also saw the best, the heroism and selflessness of so many that day, people that risked and gave their lives for the sake of others was truly inspiring in such a dark time.
My knee jerk reaction at the time was to see the terrorists completly erradicated without mercy, my reaction to this day is the same.

Thrudh
09-11-2009, 12:22 PM
I've never understood how terrorists can kill civilians... How they can have no empathy? Can they not imagine how they would feel if their own brother or child or parent or friend was killed?

The sucide bomber standing there in the crowded marketplace... children playing nearby... How can they do it? What part of being human is missing?

On 9/11 8 years ago, for some reason, I was late to work, and I had the TV on... I saw the reports on the first one, watched for a while, then went to work... There was a TV on at work, and everyone was watching... 2 minutes after I walked over, the second plane hit.. Later, when the towers fell, I remember thinking "10,000 people just died... right now... at this moment". I felt like I was going to vomit.

This event was very powerful for most of us, because we WATCHED it, in real-time... That's pretty unique... Most cases like this, a bomb would go off, and then we'd get footage of the blown up building... The fact that there were TWO planes, and it took the towers a while to fall, meant the whole world watched it as it happened...

Tinrae
09-11-2009, 04:36 PM
I remember I was already at work that day, and had walked into the employee lounge to refill my cup of coffee when I saw on the television a burning building with scroll news feed at the bottom saying a plane had hit the WTC. I was just stunned, unbelieving. My boss saw me standing there and walked over to see what I was watching, and we both stood together for a very long time - hopeless, mesmerized by the destruction, madness.

We watched as the second plane hit. We watched the emergency responders scramble to do what they could. We watched a single body plummet off the top...the camera following it's descent. We watched the buildings fall.

Called our loved ones. Went home to continue watching the aftermath of the horror.

I'm lucky that I personally did not lose a loved one in that tragedy, but it was an extremely sad and scary day.

ariel7
09-17-2009, 06:45 PM
I hate it that people showcase themselves in a poor light in rememberance of such a tragic event. I do not know what is worse....
the event itself
events after which that were justified by the event
grandstanding and making views based on the event
exploitation of the victims afterward
wild accusations surrounding the event

8 years and several days ago I was a very successful entrepreneur in Manhattan, with a company employing 35, and out out of that 35, 32 were Veterans or Disabled Veterans. People that worked for me earned an average of 50% more than those who worked for competitors, I had an incredible amount of fun doing what I was doing. Life was good.

Some people, who feel that others that they do not know, and have not met, should be killed, and that such an action was justifiable. Well, they succeeded in murdering thousands. And causing the loss of many lives to be lost afterwards. Apart from losing friends in the attack itself, customers in the attack itself, a brother who thankfully returned from a tour in Iraq who caused me more than one gray hair worrying for his safety, the tears I shed over one of my very best friends of my life who died in Afghanistan, the loss of someone I greatly admired, Pat Tillman, the loss of the ability to employ and help better the lives of 35 individuals who had come to depend on me in that role, the loss of my own business and source of income, the loss of the prestige and respect of being such a successful entrepreneur, the loss of the ability to continue paying my cousin's way through college, I lost something that I didn't think could ever be taken away:

I lost the ability to respect several people I previously had, and all for the same reason: The took a tragedy that was significant, catastrophic and heart-wrenching for many of those involved, and they took it upon themselves to make horrible, racist and bigoted statements in the name of those who died, or suffered, they used the event to further their own petty agendas, to divide, to sow seeds of mistrust and hatred. They dishonored those who had already died, they tried to build themselves on the ashes of the fallen.

A big one finger salute to those that do that.

I ask you, all of you, let 9/11 be a day of solemn remembrance for what we lost, what we nearly lost, and don't abuse its memory as a soap box to stand on to advance an agenda. People suffered, people died. Remember them, show them honor.

Jaywade
09-23-2009, 10:39 PM
every time I read the posts in this thread my eyes well up...
laugh if you want to but they do....
almost every male member of my family has served in either one of the armed forces or law enforcement or both
I will always remember the horror of watching thoses planes wreck terror on americans here at home in the us of a

I know how we reacted angers some..... I have friends over there (iraq and afgan) I am so proud of them

try to remember what happend and try to remember those that respond to threats and keep us safe

god bless